Author Topic: Drunken Turkey Neck  (Read 8790 times)

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Offline Old Philosopher

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Drunken Turkey Neck
« on: March 26, 2012, 10:34:36 PM »
No, the turkey neck isn't actually fried with booze....I am.

Absolutely ravenous, and wanted something resembling meat. Soup or Top Ramen were not an option.

I pulled a turkey neck out of the freezer, and defrosted it for10 minutes in the microwave. What follows is the shortest tutorial on pressure cooking ever posted.

DIRECTIONS:

Set up your pressure cooker. Wash and oil the gasket. Find your pressure weight where you threw it in the back of a drawer 6 months ago.



Heat enough oil in pressure cooker pan to keep turkey neck from sticking
Season neck liberally with seasoned salt, cracked pepper and granulated garlic power.
Throw neck in pan
Sear until brown



Pour 1 cu water in pan
Place lid on pan with 15 lbs weight in place



Cook on medium heat for 20 minutes
Remove pan from heat, remove weight with tongs, or fork. The pressure released will further tenderize the meat (sort of like a diver coming up from 100 ft too fast  :o )



Eat! Total time from freezer to plate, 30 minutes.


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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2012, 10:42:35 PM »
Fork tender?



I have a small pressure cooker..  never used it.     Mmmm...    What else do you cook in your cooker?


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2012, 10:54:26 PM »
Fork tender?

I have a small pressure cooker..  never used it.     Mmmm...    What else do you cook in your cooker?

WW.
At 20 minutes it was beyond fork tender. The bones of the neck fell apart, and even the tiny ones were edible.
Pressure cooking? Let's see....

Salisbury Steak
Pork Chops
Braised chicken
Stews, soups....
Just about anything. Just think of a pressure cooker as a range top microwave. Cook faster and more tender meats.

As a matter of fact, a little known secret of Colonel Sander's chicken is that it's cooked in oil under pressure. He started his business with a pressure cooker on a camp stove in the trunk of his car.  8)
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2012, 10:59:05 PM »
Reeeeally..   I didnt know that about Col Sanders.     WOuldnt that oil bubble up into that hole on top and comprimise the pot?      I do can jars..  but its hard to think of a smaller pot doing this kind of cooking.     

Can this pot be used safely on a campfire?   

I have a feeling I'm about to learn something new.. :)
I guess I'll save turkey necks from now on.
WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2012, 11:17:22 PM »
Bummer!  All our turkey necks come out of the pressure cooker and get pulled and shredded for inclusion in the sage dressing along with the hearts and gizzards :'(
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2012, 11:30:35 PM »
Reeeeally..   I didnt know that about Col Sanders.     WOuldnt that oil bubble up into that hole on top and comprimise the pot?      I do can jars..  but its hard to think of a smaller pot doing this kind of cooking.     

Can this pot be used safely on a campfire?   

I have a feeling I'm about to learn something new.. :)
I guess I'll save turkey necks from now on.
WW.
If you ever cook beef, venison, or turkey hearts, a pressure cooking is the way to go. Juicy and tender.

You can cook over a fire, just like you can can preserves over a wood fire. Just have to pay attention to the heat. Pressure cookers have a safety plug. If you screw up and let it boil dry, the plug goes before anything blows up.

I was looking for a picture of Harland Sander traveling around promoting his chicken from this car, with his wife his only assistant. Can't find it, so here's a Wiki snippet.

Quote
At the age of 40, Sanders cooked chicken dishes and other meals for people who stopped at his service station in Corbin, Kentucky. Since he did not have a restaurant, he served customers in his adjacent living quarters. His local popularity grew, and Sanders moved to a motel and 142 seat restaurant, later Harland Sanders Caf? and Museum. Over the next nine years he developed his "secret recipe" for frying chicken in a pressure fryer that cooked the chicken much faster than pan frying.

His modified pressure cooker is not one you'd buy off the shelf these days.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2012, 11:31:43 PM »
Bummer!  All our turkey necks come out of the pressure cooker and get pulled and shredded for inclusion in the sage dressing along with the hearts and gizzards :'(
Excellent, and quick way to prepare the giblets!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2012, 11:39:03 PM »

I have a small pressure cooker..  never used it.     Mmmm...    What else do you cook in your cooker?


WW.
Here's an example. How about soaking your beans overnight, and then turning out finished chilli in 18 minutes, including browning the beef in the pressure cooker?
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2012, 11:41:22 PM »
Are broasted potatoes done the same way?  If so.. do you know how to make them?   Dont put that pan away just yet...   LOL

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2012, 12:09:29 AM »
Are broasted potatoes done the same way?  If so.. do you know how to make them?   Dont put that pan away just yet...   LOL

WW.
I don't know that you can "broast" potatoes, unless your talking about pressure cooked French fries.
Who knows who stole what idea from whom, but "broasted" chicken is essentially what KFC does, using different equipment designs than the Broaster trade name frier. They both came on the market at the same time.

In any case, you cannot "broast" anything in a home pressure cooker, because the heat generated by enough oil to deep fry something would melt the rubber gasket, and raise hell with the rest of the pot, too.

BUT, you can do mashed potatoes in a pressure cooker in 5-7 minutes, instead of 30.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2012, 12:13:51 AM by Old Philosopher »
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2012, 02:06:01 AM »
Gotta luv the Pressure Cooker! Fast & tender. & frozen or not... :)
Them necks looked good!  Mmmm. Making me hungry!
BTW, I think a pressure cooker is one of the best presents to give a newlywed couple, if of course, they fnd the time to use it... ;) LOL & of course if they "do" use it. It was kinda like the "microwave" oven, before microwaves became popular. Quick meals on the stove top.
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2012, 11:56:49 AM »
Making me hungry! They are a bit fussy with all the bones but good for a snack.

I've got a pressure cooker. It's just the thing for shredded meat to put in tacos. The fast cooking, tenderizing effect really helps for meats you plan to shred.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2012, 12:15:06 PM »
What about wild game/poultry that is suggested to cook with bacon fat for tenderness?    Do these type of meats cook well in a pressure cooker withOUT the bacon fat?   Or is that in there along with whatever i'm cooking? 

I've got two cookbooks home from the library about wild game and cooking it.   I dont think I've seen one recipe in there calling for a pressure cooker.    Dutch ovens, yes.

To my way of thinking, a pressure cooker would make more sense on cooking on a fire , quick and less usage of wood for cooking.   Not like using cast iron.     ( yes I'm feeling like a traitor thinking of something other than my cast iron. :) )


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2012, 12:15:38 PM »
.... The fast cooking, tenderizing effect really helps for meats you plan to shred.
LOL! I'm pretty sure you could eat saddle leather if you cooked it in a pressure cooker. Hahaha!
I just re-read my own post. ROF! The comment about pulling the weight to cause rapid decompression inside the pot was not meant to be funny. If you release the pressure rapidly from a pressure canner when canning food, the contents of the jars will (at the very least) be forced out around the lid, spoiling the seal, or (worst case) the jars will actually explode.
Well, when you do that with a meat dish in a pressure cooker, this rapid decompression further tears the meat fibers apart and makes it even more tender.  The bits of stuff you see in the 4th picture were a result of this. This isn't recommended for all pressure cooking recipes, and probably not recommended at all by the manufacturers, but I'm just tellin' ya how it works.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2012, 12:25:01 PM »
What about wild game/poultry that is suggested to cook with bacon fat for tenderness?    Do these type of meats cook well in a pressure cooker withOUT the bacon fat?   Or is that in there along with whatever i'm cooking? 

I've got two cookbooks home from the library about wild game and cooking it.   I dont think I've seen one recipe in there calling for a pressure cooker.    Dutch ovens, yes.

To my way of thinking, a pressure cooker would make more sense on cooking on a fire , quick and less usage of wood for cooking.   Not like using cast iron.     ( yes I'm feeling like a traitor thinking of something other than my cast iron. :) )
The bacon idea is to add fat content to lean (wild) meat. It's not really to tenderize it. The lean meat is basted by the bacon fat during cooking, and doesn't dry out as much.

Well, DO vs. pressure cooker. Again, just the twisted way my mind works, but a DO cooks like a half-arsed pressure cooker. Think about how heavy the lid is. We all know that water boils faster with a lid on the pot. It's because of the trapped heat and pressure.

So....if you took a pressure cooker, removed the rubber gasket, and the lugs to hold the lid on, and the pressure regulator (weight or gauge), you'd have a Dutch oven.  :)
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2012, 12:26:05 PM »
When I use a pressure cooker I always stand in the next room and peek around the door jamb.  My mother always told me they could blow up and so I stay the heck out of the way.  Ruins all the fun but its hard not to believe your mother. 

She made a great beef and vegetable soup in hers back in the day.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2012, 12:30:35 PM »
When you mentioned Beef soup...  reminded me of my mother making Oxtail soup.   Oh yum!   

With my Uncle being an on the farm butcher, he'd have tails mom could just come and get.   They werent worth the effort to skin out.    Theres ALOT of meat on those tails.  :)     But tasty.

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drunken Turkey Neck
« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2012, 01:15:22 PM »
When I use a pressure cooker I always stand in the next room and peek around the door jamb.  My mother always told me they could blow up and so I stay the heck out of the way.  Ruins all the fun but its hard not to believe your mother. 

She made a great beef and vegetable soup in hers back in the day.
After I started this thread, I pulled out the cookbook that came with my cooker eons ago. Pretty funny, because stuck in the back was the receipt for the safety plug I had to replace when I boiled mine dry by accident.
The safety plug is a soft metal plug that is mounted in a fitting that screws into the lid of the cooker. I believe they are rated at 80 psi, waaaay below what it would take to "blow up" a pressure cooker! When one blows, they WILL get your attention! It sounds like .38 going off in the house, followed by a rush of air. Wheee!  But they are easily replaced, and no harm done.

A pressuer CANNER lid will be fitted with a gravity plug, the nipple vent where you place the weight after venting the canner, and either a dial gauge or a safety plug. A canner with a gauge doesn't need a safety plug, because if the pressure gets too high, it will blow the gauge right off the pot.  :o The gauge is mounted in a rubber grommet, and that's the weak point.  I've never had a gauge blow, and don't want to. BUT, IT'S VIRTUALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO "BLOW YOURSELF UP" WITH A MODERN PRESSURE CANNER/COOKER.
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