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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by crashdive123 on Today at 04:38:26 AM »
Stan, cobblers are exactly why I use parchment paper.  That and casseroles.  The cleanup isn't that hard even without the paper, but it's so easy to use why not?  My banana bread/cobbler turned out very wet and I'm glad I used paper with that.  I'm going to try bread in my #6 in preparation for solo at the 'vous.

Tony, when baking bread at the rendezvous just be sure that your parchment paper is made from animal skin like our Declaration of Independence is written on, instead of its modern counterpart, or you will surely incur the wrath of the dreaded 'Zombie Thread Counters!' :lol:

Hushnel warned me at my first rendezvous about the Thread Counters and the Dog soldiers... it's all about timing.  LOL.  Maybe I can get comfortable going naked dutch oven on the bread before then.  I'll probably cheat on the cobblers though.

If you are naked while you are cooking in your Dutch Oven trust me.....none of the thread counters will bother you. :sarcasm: :doh: :puke: :rofl:
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I made a long comparison video of these two haversacks in case anyone was deciding between the two. Can't go wrong with either of them, they're both great American made w/ excellent materials and craftsmanship. Both patterned after military bread bags and around the same size, but there are a number of differences.

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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by Moe M. on Yesterday at 03:35:36 PM »
I guess I don't understand why one would use parchment paper when baking bread? :shrug:   When we finish baking a loaf of free-form sourdough bread or a batch of biscuits in a bake kettle  8) there's never anything left in it to indicate anything had been baked in it at all.....other than a crumb or two, maybe. :coffee:    I don't recall Wishbone ever using it on the trail drives. :lol:

  It's a Dutch Oven,  it used to be a bake kettle, now it's a Dutch Oven.  (don't be a trouble maker)

  Wishbone never baked a loaf of bread or worked a trail drive.  (he was a cute bearded comic character on a TV show)

  I use it because it negates any clean up, and it helps to lift a hot loaf of bread out of an even hotter cast iron pot without burning your fingers.

I won't dispute any of that......EXCEPT that last sentence.  :duel:      As you stated in your previous post, your pizzas and sourdough loaves, which call for very high initial temperatures, come out tasting ''a bit different'' and the burned parchment ''fell apart when touched like burnt paper'' when trying to lift the pizza from the vessel.  That reportedly occurred at an estimated 475* for the relatively short period of time it takes to bake a properly done pizza crust.  Since a decent freeform sourdough loaf requires an initial baking temperature of 500* to get the 'oven spring' needed to get the bread to rise properly and the texture desired, the effects of that much heat for an even longer baking time would weaken the paper so much you'd never be able to use it to lift a loaf from the oven without the paper disintegrating..... plus, the bread would taste like burnt paper!  :puke:

I could see why some people find it useful for cobblers, sugary cinnamon rolls or fruit pies that sometimes leak their contents onto the floor of the oven and make a mess, but when high baking temperatures are required and burnt paper starts flavoring the goodies we bake, I call FOUL! :stir:

  LOL, no need to resort to blades old pard, just a little misunderstanding, I said I got burned paper and a bad taste when I cranked the oven to 500*F.,  I don't see any need for extreme baking or cooking temps, most of my baking is done between 350* and 425* with good results.
  I bake my pizza on a stone or sheet pans in the oven, I preheat the oven to 450* then turn it down to 400* when I put them in, I don't get burned parchment paper or any taste from the paper,  and bake breads in a Dutch oven, again, I preheat the Dutch oven to 450* in the kitchen oven before putting the bread in parchment paper into the Dutch Oven, then turn the oven down to 425*, the only browning of the paper happens to the paper that hangs out from under the lid,  the bread browns well and what ever paper that's inside the oven doesn't brown or impart any taste to the bread,  I bake my biscuits at 450*,  the parchment paper just barely shows browning, but the taste is not affected .
 If I'm baking sweets like cobblers, sticky buns, and such I usually do it in a well seasoned cast iron skillet without getting sticking or making a mess,  I do line my cake pans with aluminum foil and give them a spritz cooking spray,  I find there's no mess and I get less browning of the sides of the cakes and less doming of the tops. 
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wolfy on Yesterday at 10:07:46 AM »
I guess I don't understand why one would use parchment paper when baking bread? :shrug:   When we finish baking a loaf of free-form sourdough bread or a batch of biscuits in a bake kettle  8) there's never anything left in it to indicate anything had been baked in it at all.....other than a crumb or two, maybe. :coffee:    I don't recall Wishbone ever using it on the trail drives. :lol:

  It's a Dutch Oven,  it used to be a bake kettle, now it's a Dutch Oven.  (don't be a trouble maker)

  Wishbone never baked a loaf of bread or worked a trail drive.  (he was a cute bearded comic character on a TV show)

  I use it because it negates any clean up, and it helps to lift a hot loaf of bread out of an even hotter cast iron pot without burning your fingers.

I won't dispute any of that......EXCEPT that last sentence.  :duel:      As you stated in your previous post, your pizzas and sourdough loaves, which call for very high initial temperatures, come out tasting ''a bit different'' and the burned parchment ''fell apart when touched like burnt paper'' when trying to lift the pizza from the vessel.  That reportedly occurred at an estimated 475* for the relatively short period of time it takes to bake a properly done pizza crust.  Since a decent freeform sourdough loaf requires an initial baking temperature of 500* to get the 'oven spring' needed to get the bread to rise properly and the texture desired, the effects of that much heat for an even longer baking time would weaken the paper so much you'd never be able to use it to lift a loaf from the oven without the paper disintegrating..... plus, the bread would taste like burnt paper!  :puke:

I could see why some people find it useful for cobblers, sugary cinnamon rolls or fruit pies that sometimes leak their contents onto the floor of the oven and make a mess, but when high baking temperatures are required and burnt paper starts flavoring the goodies we bake, I call FOUL! :stir:
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by madmax on Yesterday at 09:41:43 AM »
Stan, cobblers are exactly why I use parchment paper.  That and casseroles.  The cleanup isn't that hard even without the paper, but it's so easy to use why not?  My banana bread/cobbler turned out very wet and I'm glad I used paper with that.  I'm going to try bread in my #6 in preparation for solo at the 'vous.

Tony, when baking bread at the rendezvous just be sure that your parchment paper is made from animal skin like our Declaration of Independence is written on, instead of its modern counterpart, or you will surely incur the wrath of the dreaded 'Zombie Thread Counters!' :lol:

Hushnel warned me at my first rendezvous about the Thread Counters and the Dog soldiers... it's all about timing.  LOL.  Maybe I can get comfortable going naked dutch oven on the bread before then.  I'll probably cheat on the cobblers though. 
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wolfy on Yesterday at 09:26:50 AM »
Stan, cobblers are exactly why I use parchment paper.  That and casseroles.  The cleanup isn't that hard even without the paper, but it's so easy to use why not?  My banana bread/cobbler turned out very wet and I'm glad I used paper with that.  I'm going to try bread in my #6 in preparation for solo at the 'vous.

Tony, when baking bread at the rendezvous just be sure that your parchment paper is made from animal skin like our Declaration of Independence is written on, instead of its modern counterpart, or you will surely incur the wrath of the dreaded 'Zombie Thread Counters!' :lol:
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by Moe M. on Yesterday at 08:04:08 AM »
I guess I don't understand why one would use parchment paper when baking bread? :shrug:   When we finish baking a loaf of free-form sourdough bread or a batch of biscuits in a bake kettle  8) there's never anything left in it to indicate anything had been baked in it at all.....other than a crumb or two, maybe. :coffee:    I don't recall Wishbone ever using it on the trail drives. :lol:

  It's a Dutch Oven,  it used to be a bake kettle, now it's a Dutch Oven.  (don't be a trouble maker)

  Wishbone never baked a loaf of bread or worked a trail drive.  (he was a cute bearded comic character on a TV show)

  I use it because it negates any clean up, and it helps to lift a hot loaf of bread out of an even hotter cast iron pot without burning your fingers.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wsdstan on Yesterday at 07:39:48 AM »
 :cheers: :cheers: , yep it is good stuff.   You can write on it too.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by madmax on Yesterday at 06:16:36 AM »
Stan, cobblers are exactly why I use parchment paper.  That and casseroles.  The cleanup isn't that hard even without the paper, but it's so easy to use why not?  My banana bread/cobbler turned out very wet and I'm glad I used paper with that.  I'm going to try bread in my #6 in preparation for solo at the 'vous.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wsdstan on October 20, 2018, 06:52:16 PM »
I used it because the Southern Living recipe said to use it.  It does, in the case of cookies, pies, and other things that leak, or have oil in them make cleanup easy when using aluminum pans or steel cookie sheets.  Not so much with biscuits but I tend to follow instructions most of the time.

It isn't really useful in cast iron except you could, I think, make a peach cobbler in your DO without it being baked on when your done.  Of course that is just in case your seasoning has worn thin in a couple of places.
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