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Food and Cooking / Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Last post by Alan R McDaniel Jr on Today at 07:00:43 PM »
Personally, I do not like the smoked pork or pulled pork type dishes.  I do like grilled pork steaks and breakfast sausage.  In the past I liked more diverse dishes
but lately I like a lot less grease.  I do like smoked loins or backstrap but the shoulders and hams have too much fat for my tastes these days.  Smoking them is certainly
very good, I just can't take it any more.

Alan
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Food and Cooking / Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Last post by Alan R McDaniel Jr on Today at 06:52:45 PM »
I have killed, butchered, cooked and eaten lots of feral hogs. 

I have found that there are several things that contribute to how wild(feral) pork tastes much prior to actual cooking. 

1. The condition of the animal. A nursing sow will not taste good, nor will there be any tenderness to the meat. A lean or poor condition boar may have a disagreeably strong taste. 
Animals that are in poor condition are either sick or food is scarce and they are eating things they would not normally eat, thus making the meat taste like that.  You are what you eat.  Pigs are too.
In my experience, hogs that have been on acorn mast and have a layer of fat from acorn mast taste the best.

2. The shot.  One good clean instantaneous kill shot does wonders for the taste of the meat.  Head (behind the ear) shots or point of the shoulder shots work the best for me.

3.  Cleaning.  I do not gut my hogs in the field.  I get them in the truck and back to camp where the water hose is as soon as I can (Like stop everything and go tend to the hog ASAP).
I hang the hog by it's hind legs and wash the hog completely scrubbing with a brush.  This removes dirt, pests and the urine mud they roll in.
Only when the outside is clean do I go inside. Nearly every hog I've killed had a full bladder.  It is extremely important NOT to puncture it.   On boars it is also important to keep all the boar hardware
out of the way and intact.  You don't want leaks.  After gutting all the way to the chin, I then wash the inside with water.  Since it is often warm out down here I do't allow it to cool.  I start
skinning right away being careful to keep hair off the meat.  I do save the heart, liver and pancreas for catfish bait.

4. Butchering.  Cleanliness is the key.  I use a large ice chest and put quartered and trimmed portions in it.  When I get it all in I cover with ice and add water and more ice until it is full of
lots of ice and filled in with water.  I stays there for a day.  This chills the meat and pulls the blood out.  As I butcher I slice off most of the fat for rendering and I give that to some ladies I know
who like to use hog lard to make good things to eat.  Acorn mast fat is pure white and the lard is beautiful.

The actual cutting up of the meat is done to personal preference.  If you've cleaned it properly, cooking it will almost always be successful.

I have found that mast fed boars do not have a strong boar taste generally.  I have killed 400# boars that tasted great.  I've killed 200# sows that were inedible.

Usually it's good, to, upon beginning the gutting process, to slice off a piece and throw it in a frying pan.  Normally, you'll know even before you taste it from the smell.


Alan
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General Discussion / Re: Goin South
« Last post by Spyder1958 on Today at 06:29:12 PM »
Merry Christmas Dave. Hope you have a wonderful time. looking forward to seeing you adventure.
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 Most Eastwing hatchets aren't expensive when new, their basic models come with either leather washer type handles or blue over molded rubber type handles, the value of a used but serviceable Eastwing Hatchet is usually on a par with new hardware store hatchets from Ace, Lowe's, or Home Depot, usually under $20.00.
 In most cases they are worth more sitting in your garage or basement in case you ever need one than it's worth to sell it.

My Estwing axe certainly has more sentimental value than monetary value. My great grandfather bought it when he was involved with scouting in 1940s, my grandfather used it when he was in scouting in the 1950s, my father used it when he was a scout in the 1960s.

Not bad for a 70 year old hatchet.
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I found an Estwing e3 2h carpenters hatchet on Amazon for about $40 new, $50 for the stacked leather handle version.
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You know Wolfy that is one of those ideas that makes you say "Dayum why didn't I think of that?"  I think it could be ground out down to the point where it is wide open again.  I will look at it.  Thanks.
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How 'bout eliminating the damaged portion completely?   Belknap produced a model very similar to yours that is straight on top with only the round bottom portion at the eye.  From the photo, it looks like you could modify it & almost completely eliminate the damaged section if the top of the eye was on a straight plane from the notch to the foot of the poll. :shrug:
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The eye is a lot worse than my photo shows Moe, it is pounded both inward and down.  I will probably mess with it a little and if it starts to come out I will post more about it.  I think it may have a future as a splitting wedge at this point. 
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 Pegleg your photo did not show up.  You have to use a photo hosting site and copy a link from there.

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 Most Eastwing hatchets aren't expensive when new, their basic models come with either leather washer type handles or blue over molded rubber type handles, the value of a used but serviceable Eastwing Hatchet is usually on a par with new hardware store hatchets from Ace, Lowe's, or Home Depot, usually under $20.00.
 In most cases they are worth more sitting in your garage or basement in case you ever need one than it's worth to sell it. 
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