Author Topic: Just getting started  (Read 14613 times)

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Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #50 on: February 03, 2016, 12:14:38 PM »
I agree.
Looking good.

Did you use sapwood or heartwood?

Thank you!
And heartwood was used. There are quite a few wild Bradfords in a" beginning to get overgrown" section in the back field.
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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #51 on: February 03, 2016, 01:19:09 PM »
So is it like the stuff here, a dark reddish orange  color that slowly fades a slightly pinkish off white?

my bigger bowls cracked like crazy, but seems like a good hardwood for carving

Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #52 on: February 03, 2016, 04:53:55 PM »
:thumbsup: Great carvings :D. My first projects were rather hideous, the first spoon I ever made was out of seasoned Black Oak with a stock Mora 164. Much later, I had a friend of mine reprofile the Mora 164, now it carves a lot smoother. I'm not quite ready for a kuksa yet, I did try that twice with seasoned plum lol....too damn tough it was to carve. Perhaps I should try green/fresh stuff for that?....

Really like the selection of woods you have :). Here I have a seemingly endless supply of Wild Black Cherry and Sweet Birch, some Grey Birch, Black Walnut, apple (crabs and modern cultivated varieties), Sugar Maple, and Norway Maple for hardwoods. I have heard Chinese Privet has a spectacular grain, as do a lot of the pear varieties. Lucky you :D
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Offline jeremyctry

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #53 on: February 03, 2016, 10:40:16 PM »
Very nice work bud when are you going to start on a kuksa?

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Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #54 on: February 04, 2016, 07:02:30 AM »
So is it like the stuff here, a dark reddish orange  color that slowly fades a slightly pinkish off white?

my bigger bowls cracked like crazy, but seems like a good hardwood for carving

Initially it turned a very pale orange-ish color when I removed the bark, but during the carving/drying process it remained a creamy color.
"I may be goin' to hell in a bucket baby, but at least I'm enjoyin' the ride!"

Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #55 on: February 04, 2016, 07:03:52 AM »
:thumbsup: Great carvings :D. My first projects were rather hideous, the first spoon I ever made was out of seasoned Black Oak with a stock Mora 164. Much later, I had a friend of mine reprofile the Mora 164, now it carves a lot smoother. I'm not quite ready for a kuksa yet, I did try that twice with seasoned plum lol....too damn tough it was to carve. Perhaps I should try green/fresh stuff for that?....

Really like the selection of woods you have :). Here I have a seemingly endless supply of Wild Black Cherry and Sweet Birch, some Grey Birch, Black Walnut, apple (crabs and modern cultivated varieties), Sugar Maple, and Norway Maple for hardwoods. I have heard Chinese Privet has a spectacular grain, as do a lot of the pear varieties. Lucky you :D

Thanks NEB!
And if you would like to try some privet, let me know. I can send you a couple of rounds to try.
"I may be goin' to hell in a bucket baby, but at least I'm enjoyin' the ride!"

Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #56 on: February 04, 2016, 07:05:37 AM »
Very nice work bud when are you going to start on a kuksa?

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Thanks Jeremy! As far as a kuksa, I'll wait a bit before I try to tackle one. I actually have access to several good sized wild cherry burls when I do attempt one.
"I may be goin' to hell in a bucket baby, but at least I'm enjoyin' the ride!"

Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #57 on: February 04, 2016, 02:03:37 PM »
Very nice work bud when are you going to start on a kuksa?

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Thanks Jeremy! As far as a kuksa, I'll wait a bit before I try to tackle one. I actually have access to several good sized wild cherry burls when I do attempt one.
Hmmmmmmmm....seems like we can work out a trade :cheers:
I've got more Wild Black Cherry (Prunus serotina) than I know what to do with. I source mine from a public, town-owned park...the grove of cherry is soooooo thick from undergrowth and being too close to one another that it needs a serious coppice. I already covered about an area of 100 ft. The stuff has wonderful grain, especially the burly burls :D. Plus, most of the trees there are young and the perfect size for kuksas, staves, and spoons. Let me check my current stock, I might have to coppice another tree....I'll let 'ya know. ;)
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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #58 on: February 04, 2016, 06:12:40 PM »
Neb what do you mean by "needs a serious coppice" and "coppice another tree" ?

Online wolfy

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #59 on: February 04, 2016, 07:21:31 PM »
I looked 'coppice' up......it's a British word for 'whack to ground level' :chopwood: :shrug: :lol:
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Offline BigHat

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #60 on: February 04, 2016, 07:25:00 PM »
nice looking work!


thanks for sharing!
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Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #61 on: February 04, 2016, 07:28:51 PM »
Neb what do you mean by "needs a serious coppice" and "coppice another tree" ?
Nuts...don't have any pics to show you what I mean  :[ ....

OK...the area in question is maybe 3 acres of very overgrown and dense forest, primarily dominated with Black Cherry. These trees have grown so close together (sometimes less than 24 inches) that they will never be able to fully mature. As it is right now, much of the grove is overrun with invasives such as Asiatic Bittersweet and Autumn Olive. I do my part by removing as much Bittersweet as I can (not easy when the root systems of large vines can go 30 ft in two directions), eating the delicious Autumn Olive berries (helping in a small way to prevent a complete takeover), and removing Black Cherry trees that are either dead standing, diseased, contorted from being top-heavy with bittersweet vines, or weaker ones that are growing to close to healthier specimens. So far I've created a small area that is a bit more open than what it used to be, and the Black Cherry trees there should grow to be healthy (or at the least, healthier) and not try to out-compete one another.

"Coppicing" is a term used to describe the cutting-back of excessive growth. It is one of the earliest forms of agriculture, and is still in usage in Europe with hazel bushes. It is a very useful technique for creating a more open environment and for controlling the growth so that the trees, shrubs, or bushes will develop to maturity and not be cloistered with one another fighting for the same nutrients and sunlight. Aside from that, it also helps to control invasives so that they have less favourable growing conditions. Asiatic Bittersweet is one of our worst invasives because it develops so rapidly and is a hell of a pain to remove completely. It will wire around trees, especially trees that are growing too close to each other, branching out among them and creating a canopy of vines that damages the overall forest ecology by blocking sunlight to lower plants. This also creates a dangerous situation for the affected trees, making them very top heavy. I have seen trees felled purely by the weight of the bittersweet vines in the canopy. It has taken the place of native species such as Greenbrier, which can only be found in well-managed woodlands that are absent of bittersweet. It is very slow to take over in open woodlands, even with ample sunlight, because it has little to grab onto.

Aside from trail work that involves clearing a downed tree, this is one of the few other instances where tree removal can benefit a woodland and promote healthy growth under watchful eyes and careful monitoring. The wood is a bonus on the side - sometimes I get really nice, seasoned saplings that were felled by wind and the weight of bittersweet, perfect for staves or spoons, and sometimes I have to take down a larger Black Cherry that is top-heavy with bittersweet or too close to another, healthier tree, and that gives me larger sections for firewood and kuksa blanks which I trade to a friend of mine who is a woodcarver. It is a sustainable practice, and in this case a win-win for everyone :):choptree:
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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #62 on: February 04, 2016, 07:58:54 PM »
Thanks NEB.

I've never done it, but have always understood it to be a way to get lots of long straight sticks, or waiting more seasons to get heavier poles.

Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #63 on: February 05, 2016, 09:16:37 AM »
Thanks NEB.

I've never done it, but have always understood it to be a way to get lots of long straight sticks, or waiting more seasons to get heavier poles.
In Europe, oftentimes the coppiced hazel branches are re-purposed to make wattle fencing. :)
"Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe." ~ Abraham Lincoln
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Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #64 on: March 07, 2016, 08:36:29 AM »
Cherry wood.





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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #65 on: March 07, 2016, 02:17:27 PM »
 :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #66 on: May 04, 2016, 08:29:51 AM »
Thanks for the thumbs up Crash!
I haven't posted in a while, so I'll catch up...



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Online wolfy

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #67 on: May 04, 2016, 08:53:40 AM »
Those are a little different than your common, everyday, run-of-the-mill spoon......very nice! :thumbsup:
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Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Just getting started
« Reply #68 on: May 05, 2016, 06:39:35 AM »
Thanks wolfy! I'm getting a little more comfortable in my carving and decided to get a little creative... 8)
"I may be goin' to hell in a bucket baby, but at least I'm enjoyin' the ride!"