Author Topic: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES  (Read 43228 times)

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Offline wolfy

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DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« on: April 26, 2012, 06:41:20 PM »
I didn't put this in the recipe section, as it is a PDF file from www.camp-cook.com It's another forum I have hung out on in the past, but just don't have the time anymore.  There are lots of good folks there, but they are more into teardrop trailers, gathering to cook in Dutch ovens, collecting iron, etc.  If you drop by, tell 'em I sent you.

Here's the file of over 1100 recipes............ ..................t hat I swiped >:D

http://www.camp-cook.com/postings/campfire_cooking.pdf
« Last Edit: November 10, 2012, 07:07:40 PM by wolfy »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2012, 06:53:04 PM »
Great resource! Thanks!
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Offline zammer

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2012, 09:43:57 AM »
Good God man, thats the Motherlode!....cool that they allow the recipes to be freely shared
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Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2012, 01:56:31 PM »
 :banana: :banana: :banana: :thumbsup: BOOKMARKED for future yummyness!
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Offline Gryphon

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2012, 06:22:56 PM »
Way cool.  That's in my archives now too!  Really great that it's a pdf! 
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Offline greyhound352

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2012, 05:09:35 AM »
Thanks for posting this, Wolfy.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2012, 07:02:12 PM »
We have used this collection of DUTCH OVEN RECIPES in our Scout troop as kind of a 'standard bearer' for recipes when we're looking for something new for the boys to prepare for their meals.  It was originally collected by a Scoutmaster from and for use by the leaders in preparing Dutch oven meals for themselves in their own own camps and has been added to for years.  There are a lot of great proven and tasy dishes in here, and just like the one in my first post has lots to choose from.......113 pages of goodness 8)

http://www.macscouter.com/cooking/geezercookbook.asp
 :tent:
« Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 05:59:02 PM by PetrifiedWood »
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2012, 04:45:53 PM »
I am posting this AGAIN because it works well enough to be a 'sticky' on another website and WoodsWoman was apparently suffering from A.D.D. when I delivered this lecture the last time :shrug:   Since she is getting ready to try baking bread in her Dutch oven and continues to fret about burning her buns >:D this is a foolproof way af achieving total heat control with briquettes to learn bread-baking 8)
 
Are you listening this time, young lady?   Also, please re-read my signature line :deadhorse:
This RING METHOD is an excellent method of controlling temperatue in your Dutch ovens.  I use it and it WORKS!

My last post didn't get many 'looks', either and is also a good collection of easy stuff to use out in camping situations with your D.O.  Be sure to at least give it a glance; you are almost certain to find something useful for quick and tasty camp dishes :stir:

CHARCOAL AND TEMPERATURE CONTROL

Beginners frequently over-start their charcoal. By that I mean they leave it in the starter too long before they use it. It should take only 10 to 15 minutes to start charcoal in a chimney starter, and anything longer than that is a waste. It may not look lit in the starter, but if it has flames coming out the top and no smoke, it is ready. Dump out the coals and use the fully lit ones first. Charcoal that has been started for 30 minutes before it is put on a pot will be half burned away, and will not produce as much heat per briquette.  It will also not provide heat long enough to finish some recipes.  Always start more charcoal than you need, so you can add the extra later to maintain heat if necessary, especially if it is windy. All recipes assume that you use fresh, properly lit charcoal. A few lit coals in a starter will start charcoal put on top.

When I first started this Dutch oven thing, I tried to count out the number of charcoal briquettes called for in the Dutch Oven recipe books.  I rapidly found this to be far less than satisfactory for me, as it's dangerous to have to take your shoes off  to count hot charcoal. In addition, I found out that you have to use more of the cheaper brands of charcoal than if you use a quality brand such as improved Kingsford "K" charcoal.  So, I decided to measure quantities of hot charcoal by geometric patterns.   All of my recipes are based on using the improved Kingsford K charcoal or equivalent and the following "ring" method of temperature control.  The definitions are:

1-ring : If you make a circle of hot charcoal with all of the briquettes lying  flat and touching each other, with spaces left out for the legs on the bottom rings, that is "one ring". The outside edge of the ring is lined up with the outside edge of the pot, top or bottom.

1/2-ring : A "half ring" is the same size circle, but with every other briquette missing.

2- rings : is simply a second ring just inside the first, with the rings touching.

Full spread :means to put all the briquettes you can (one layer deep, lying flat) either under (very rare, except in frying) or on top of the pot.
This ring technique is kind of self-correcting for the size of the briquettes used.  If your charcoal has been burning for a while, the pieces will be smaller and will put out less heat.  But, it will take more of them to make a ring, so you still get about the same temperature.  Of course they won't last as long and the comparison is rough, but it's better than counting briquettes!

These cooking utensils were designed hundreds of years ago to cook food using coals from wood fires. Yes, of course you can cook with campfire coals, but the technique is beyond the scope of this booklet.


Most Dutch oven cookbooks tell you how many charcoal briquettes to put on the lid and how many under the pot.  As mentioned above, the resulting temperature depends on the size, and brand of your charcoal, how long it has been lit, the wind, and even if it is sunny or shady (a black pot will cook 25 degrees hotter in the summer sun than in the shade).  I have been able to cook almost everything there is to cook with just four temperatures..... slow, medium, hot, and very hot.  For a 12-inch oven, slow will have 1-ring on top, and 1 ring under the pot and be 300 +/- 25 degrees F.  Medium is 1-ring under and 1-1/2 rings on top and is 350 +/- 25 degrees F.  A hot oven is 1-ring under and 2-rings on top and is 400 +/- 25 degrees F, and very hot is 1 ring under and 2-1/2 rings on top and is 450 to 500 degrees F or so. 

Notice with this method that you never change the number of rings under the pot. The exception is for frying or boiling, where I start with a full spread under the pot, and cook with the lid on with a few coals on top just to keep the heat in. Once it is frying or boiling briskly, take a few coals out from under the pot until it is cooking  properly.  Add some back if it slows down too much. The above directions were given for a 12-inch pot. For larger pots, you will need more charcoal on top to maintain the indicated temperatures, and less charcoal on smaller pots. Temperature is controlled partly by how much (percentage) of the lid is covered with charcoal. A 10-inch pot with 2 rings on top will be considerably hotter than a 14-inch pot with 2 rings on top. This is because two rings on top of a 10-inch oven covers a lot more of the lid (percentage wise) than two rings on a 14-inch pot. You will quickly learn to adjust the absolute amount of charcoal for different size pots. Hint: 1 ring under a 10-inch pot will have three pieces of freshly lit charcoal between each leg. A 12-inch pot will have four between each leg, a 14-inch pot will have five, and yes, an 8-inch will have two. I honestly don't know how many pieces of charcoal make up the rings on the lids, as I have never counted them.

If you absolutely must know what temperature is in the oven with a certain amount of charcoal, then get an oven thermometer and find out, but that takes all the fun out of it.  Learn to "feel" how much charcoal is right for a particular dish.  I don't mean feel with your hands, but feel with your eyes.  Look inside the pot to see if your food is simmering or baking properly or browning properly, etc, and  add or take away charcoal as needed. 

Start a personal cookbook, and keep track of recipes, including how much charcoal you used, how long you cooked it, and whether it was done correctly. The final answer is to practice, and keep records. You will rapidly learn how much charcoal it takes to make your pot do what you want it to. My motto is to err on the hot side, as it is really hard to burn something in these pots, except as follows. Most Dutch oven cookbooks (there are more than 35 in print) tell you to arrange the charcoal in a checkerboard pattern both on the lid and under the oven. I have only a small problem with the lid arrangement, but I have a HUGE problem with that arrangement under the pot. YOU WILL BURN THINGS WITH A CHECKERBOARD PATTERN UNDER A POT!  Charcoal radiates heat in all directions. Those that are under the outside edge of the pot will radiate heat not only up towards the pot, but in towards the center under the pot. ALL of the coals around the edge will add to the temperature under the center of the pot. If you also have charcoal under the center of the pot, as in a checkerboard pattern, the center will be much hotter than the outside edge, and the center of baked foods will frequently burn. Many experienced Dutch oven cooks still swear by the "tried and true" method of checkerboard patterns, and they cook successfully. I have found that the ring method is more forgiving for beginners.  By the way, freshly lit charcoal will burn for about an hour when placed on/under a pot, unless it is very windy.  When windy, it burns faster, and "blows" the heat down-wind.  When windy, turn the pot 180 degrees 2 or 3 times while cooking to even out this effect.

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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2012, 07:58:30 PM »
A.D.D.    Always (a) Darling Ditz.    :P      Briquettes?   Do you KNOW how much one bag of those is??   I dont even have kids to sell .....    And I suppose we have to go right to the top and get the KING ones?  Will I ever be good enough to just use wood coals?     I'm pretty good at 'hand over temp control'.... :) 

I cant get that link to download.. pdf's kill this puter...     BUT...  I may have been a gooder girl cuz tomorrow I might be hookin up to Hughes net.....  might... maybe....   

And just to make you happy Dear Wolfy.... I printed this out..  found a tablet and wrote "DUTCH OVEN INFO"  on it...       and put it in a safe place......    inside the new dutch oven..  ha!

Yer a Sweetheart... Thank you much!     

WW.
   
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2012, 08:16:13 PM »
A.D.D.    Always (a) Darling Ditz.    :P      Briquettes?   Do you KNOW how much one bag of those is??   I dont even have kids to sell .....    And I suppose we have to go right to the top and get the KING ones?  Will I ever be good enough to just use wood coals?     I'm pretty good at 'hand over temp control'.... :) 

I cant get that link to download.. pdf's kill this puter...     BUT...  I may have been a gooder girl cuz tomorrow I might be hookin up to Hughes net.....  might... maybe....   

And just to make you happy Dear Wolfy.... I printed this out..  found a tablet and wrote "DUTCH OVEN INFO"  on it...       and put it in a safe place......    inside the new dutch oven..  ha!

Yer a Sweetheart... Thank you much!     

WW.
   

  Marcia,  wood coals from the campfire work every bit as well as processed briquettes,  it's the same stuff,  just a different size,  just cover about the same area.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2012, 08:23:49 PM »
 :-[  No, I don't know what they cost 'cause I don't use them unless it's for a car camping expedition or in a place where open fires aren't allowed.   I've got two twin-packs of 20# bags that don't even have the plastic wrap off of them; for emergency use in case of power outages or the ever present danger of the dreaded Zombie attacks..........I do remember that they were on special at Sam's Club for $10/twin pack, but that was several years ago; a heckuva deal for 40# of briquettes back then!  I guess they've gone up, huh :doh:

The point of the whole thing, though is the ring on the outside edge of the bottom NEVER changes throughout the entire range of baking temperatures......j ust keep adding fuel to the outside edge of the oven's top, filling in toward the middle for the higher baking temps for pizza and the like 8)
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2012, 08:35:36 PM »
I think I'm going to figure this out ok... :)     Wait till you see what I found on the farm here as a fire pit... lol     No.. its not the green toilet I found in the woods... altho that would be hilarious.... LOL   I just gotta get the fourwheeler down there to haul it up the hill to the house here.   

Kingsford today at the grocery store was 11.99 for a bag.  I didnt look at the size of it tho.   I'm assuming I'll get more than one cook out of a bag full?   Gosh I hope so..

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2012, 08:46:50 PM »
Heck WW, if you've got good hardwood sticks hangin' around, I'd just bust up a few of those and let 'em turn themselves into coals :P.  Waaay cheaper 8)

Call me when the biscuits are done........wild plum jelly, please :banana:
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2012, 08:52:32 PM »
aww man.. fresh out of plum..     Got chokecherry and wild grape tho.....     :)

WW. 
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2012, 02:30:54 PM »
Thanks for the link wolfy. I can't wait to try some of these.
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2012, 08:25:50 PM »
Good stuff Wolfy.  I needed some Mexican recipes for this August and that pdf is full of them.  WoW!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2012, 06:37:12 PM »
Here's a really good and simple easy-to-bake breakfast cereal that is really tasty and easy to do in the dutch oven at camp.  Kids like it really well, too.

Amish Baked Oatmeal
1 1/2 cups quick-cooking oatmeal
1/2 cup white OR brown sugar
1/2 cup milk
1/4 cup melted butter OR margarine
1 egg
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla extract

     Lightly oil or spray 10 inch dutch oven.
     In medium bowl combine egg, milk, melted butter, vanilla extract and sugar; whisk until well combined.
     Stir in oatmeal, salt and baking powder.
     Spoon evenly into prepared dutch oven.
     Bake at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until edges are golden brown.
     Spoon immediately into a bowl.
     Top with warm milk, fresh fruit or brown sugar if desired.
     Makes 4 servings.

We have added other stuff to this basic recipe like raisins, craisins, slivered almonds, or chopped walnuts.

 
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Offline River_Womyn

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2012, 09:20:33 PM »
Here's a really good and simple easy-to-bake breakfast cereal that is really tasty and easy to do in the dutch oven at camp.  Kids like it really well, too.

Amish Baked Oatmeal
1 1/2 cups quick-cooking oatmeal
1/2 cup white OR brown sugar
1/2 cup milk
1/4 cup melted butter OR margarine
1 egg
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla extract

     Lightly oil or spray 10 inch dutch oven.
     In medium bowl combine egg, milk, melted butter, vanilla extract and sugar; whisk until well combined.
     Stir in oatmeal, salt and baking powder.
     Spoon evenly into prepared dutch oven.
     Bake at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until edges are golden brown.
     Spoon immediately into a bowl.
     Top with warm milk, fresh fruit or brown sugar if desired.
     Makes 4 servings.

We have added other stuff to this basic recipe like raisins, craisins, slivered almonds, or chopped walnuts.

Thanks for the awesome recipe!  Doing it this weekend with my bacon & eggs in a bag.  It should be an awesome brunch & maybe dinner :-[ Crazy good score on the cookbook!  Thanks!! :drool:
« Last Edit: September 03, 2012, 09:25:55 PM by River_Womyn »

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2012, 09:24:29 PM »
Wolfy, that recipes sounds like something I'm going to make very soon.   I've been hankerin oatmeal lately and this one sounds goooooood...  Thank you for sharing it.  :) 

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2012, 09:37:30 PM »
Yeah, it's pretty tasty fare and kind of a hot broken-up granola bar type of thing with cold milk over the whole thing in a bowl.  Try it with bananas, strawberries or any other kind of fresh fruit over the top or different dried fruits cooked right in the mix in the oven.......versatil e and tasty :thumbsup:
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #20 on: November 10, 2012, 07:02:19 PM »
Here's another Dutch Oven site that I had bookmarked and kind of forgot about.  It has some good stuff in it and I thought it was worth putting here for more ideas that folks might use.....

http://cmtk3.webring.org/l/rd?ring=font%3E;id=2;url=http%3A%2F%2Fpapadutch%2Ehome%2Ecomcast%2Enet%2F%7Epapadutch%2F
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Dutch Oven Camp Recipes
« Reply #21 on: November 10, 2012, 08:33:50 PM »
Here's a really good and simple easy-to-bake breakfast cereal that is really tasty and easy to do in the dutch oven at camp.  Kids like it really well, too.

Amish Baked Oatmeal
1 1/2 cups quick-cooking oatmeal
1/2 cup white OR brown sugar
1/2 cup milk
1/4 cup melted butter OR margarine
1 egg
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla extract

     Lightly oil or spray 10 inch dutch oven.
     In medium bowl combine egg, milk, melted butter, vanilla extract and sugar; whisk until well combined.
     Stir in oatmeal, salt and baking powder.
     Spoon evenly into prepared dutch oven.
     Bake at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until edges are golden brown.
     Spoon immediately into a bowl.
     Top with warm milk, fresh fruit or brown sugar if desired.
     Makes 4 servings.

We have added other stuff to this basic recipe like raisins, craisins, slivered almonds, or chopped walnuts.

   The recipe ingredients sound delish,  but there doesn't seem to be enough liquid in the 1/2 cup of milk,  one egg,  and 1/4 cup of butter to make it a breakfast cereal, unless it's supposed to be cake like,  what am I missing ?
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #22 on: November 10, 2012, 08:39:44 PM »
It's kind of granola-like in consistency, Moe......we add milk to it in a bowl or cup when we eat it.  To be honest with you, we eat more of it as a snack in the evening than for breakfast, but it's good anytime :drool:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2012, 08:55:13 PM »
It's kind of granola-like in consistency, Moe......we add milk to it in a bowl or cup when we eat it.  To be honest with you, we eat more of it as a snack in the evening than for breakfast, but it's good anytime :drool:

  Thanks Bud,  we eat a lot of oatmeal,  love oatmeal cookies,  use oatmeal in my meat balls and meat loaf,  and of course,  as a hot cereal for breakfast,  but we are used to serving it creamy and a little loose,  for lack of a more discriptive word.
  Cream of Wheat is also a favorite around here,  and the wife and I both like it with lumps.  :)

 It was a little hard to wrap my head around dry oatmeal,  but now I get it,  thanks.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #24 on: November 10, 2012, 09:13:21 PM »

... we eat a lot of oatmeal,  ...  but we are used to serving it creamy and a little loose,  for lack of a more discriptive word.
  Cream of Wheat is also a favorite around here,  and the wife and I both like it with lumps.  :)

....
FINALLY! Finally something we disagree on.
If you want a better description of runny oatmeal and Cream of Wheat, how about like something you'd find in a baby's diaper? 
Anybody for a nice bowl of Malt-o-Meal?   :puke:
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #25 on: November 10, 2012, 09:15:15 PM »
 :rofl: that's funny because I like those little gummy lumps in my Cream o' Wheat, too 8).   Have you ever tried 'steel-cut oats' for breakfast cereal?  It tastes completely different than the 'rolled-oats' variety.....good with a handful of Craisins mixed in while the're cooking!

OL' P., you're usually one who knows what yer' talkin' about, but in this case.... :doh:
« Last Edit: November 10, 2012, 09:19:08 PM by wolfy »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2012, 09:21:43 PM »
:rofl: that's funny because I like those little gummy lumps in my Cream o' Wheat, too 8) .   Have you ever tried 'steel-cut oats' for breakfast cereal?  It tastes completely different than the 'rolled-oats' variety.....good with a handful of Craisins mixed in while the're cooking!

OL' P., you're usually one who knows what yer' talkin' about, but in this case.... :doh:
I put craisins in my coleslaw, does that count?
Wolfy, we all have our own personal tastes. In my case, I have two buckets in the back room. One in labeled "people food", and the one with grain in it is labeled "chicken food".  ;D
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2012, 09:28:22 PM »
Yeah, I guess I'll let you go with that combo.....they're good in romaine salad along with a few walnuts, too ;D

I forgot to mention that the steel-cut oats & craisins are extra 'special' with a little maple syrup drizzled over the top and maybe a splash of 1/2 & 1/2 on Sunday mornings :thumbsup:
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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2012, 09:33:37 PM »
Just so we're straight, it's the "runny" part that got to me. I'm still not touchin' Cream-o-Wheat, especially with gooey lumps.
But I do enjoy a hearty bowl of thick oatmeal. I like actual raisins in mine. Mound in up in the bowl, and spoon on some brown sugar while it's steaming hot so the sugar melts onto it. A generous amount of ice cold heavy cream around the edges, and then eat it from the outside in as it cools. Oh, yeah....
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Offline Professor

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2012, 06:42:29 AM »
Yesterday, I experienced a humbling Dutch oven baking failure.  The wind was blowing 30 miles an hour, and so we parked the trucks to block the wind and set up some plywood wind blocks, too.

I was trying to bake a loaf of bread in an 8-inch round cake pan sitting off the bottom of the 12-inch oven on a little cooking rack with 3/4 inch legs.

The wind was so strong that my oven thermometer only reached 200 degrees after 15 minutes of preheating, so I added more coals.

Finally, I put the bread in and loaded the top with coals.  After an hour, the top was quite brown, but the bottom was barely baked, so we gave up and finished in the oven in the house.

The wind reduced the briquettes  to pea-sized nuggets in a few minutes, and I had a bad time even lighting the newspaper in the bottom of my chimney to make more coals.

Aaarrrggghhh!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2012, 09:11:23 AM »
Nice try, Professor :thumbsup:   Whenever I run into those conditions (and we often do) out here on the plains of Nebraska, I gain new respect for the old chuck wagon cooks who had to turn out enough sourdough biscuits to feed a batch of hungry cowboys each and every morning and evening on the trail drives :stir:   No wonder they had reputations as being crotchety >:(

Wind can be a real 'bugger' in D.O. baking, especially with briquettes, it always seems to me.  They don't really seem to be providing the lasting heat that good hardwood coals do.  The main coal-production fire itself seems to help a great deal in windy conditions......put ting the oven on the downwind side of a 'keyhole' or trench pit fire and rotating it frequently makes a big difference.   

We baked a 12# turkey in a big Texsport D.O. in the wind one time and we had to bank coals up on all sides of it to get sufficient heat.  It was kind of a blessing in disguise because I learned something in the process.  I always had trouble getting the sides of the legs and the wings roasted to a nice golden brown in that tall oven, but since then I learned that just bottom and top heat were not enough to get that picture-perfect all-over golden brown......side heat is necessary, too :P.   I am amazed at how quickly a 12# turkey roasts on a rack in a D.O., compared to our oven at home.  We've found that we can EASILY get one finished in just two hours or even less sometimes 8).   As near as I can figure, it must cook faster due to the moist heat from the cup or two of water in the bottom, the slight pressure-cooker effect, and the more even intensified heat from all sides of the cooking chamber :shrug:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2012, 09:17:13 AM »

... we eat a lot of oatmeal,  ...  but we are used to serving it creamy and a little loose,  for lack of a more discriptive word.
  Cream of Wheat is also a favorite around here,  and the wife and I both like it with lumps.  :)

....
FINALLY! Finally something we disagree on.
If you want a better description of runny oatmeal and Cream of Wheat, how about like something you'd find in a baby's diaper? 
Anybody for a nice bowl of Malt-o-Meal?   :puke:

  You'll notice I didn't say runny,  I said loose,  I don't drink it, I still use a spoon  :),  If it's takes effort to plant a spoon into my oatmeal it needs more milk.
  I like it so that I can stick a spoon in it and the spoon slowly leans over in the dish,  kind of like a pudding consistensy,  if I have to chew it for any length of time to get it down it's not oatmeal, it's calking,  and in some ways acts like it in my interior tubes,  if you get my meaning.
  Cream of wheat is good,  and the little occational lumps are like little sweet treats,  it's also good to keep around for filler in BP cartridge reloading for reduced loads,  right Wolfy.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2012, 09:25:04 AM »
Yesterday, I experienced a humbling Dutch oven baking failure.  The wind was blowing 30 miles an hour, and so we parked the trucks to block the wind and set up some plywood wind blocks, too.

I was trying to bake a loaf of bread in an 8-inch round cake pan sitting off the bottom of the 12-inch oven on a little cooking rack with 3/4 inch legs.

The wind was so strong that my oven thermometer only reached 200 degrees after 15 minutes of preheating, so I added more coals.

Finally, I put the bread in and loaded the top with coals.  After an hour, the top was quite brown, but the bottom was barely baked, so we gave up and finished in the oven in the house.

The wind reduced the briquettes  to pea-sized nuggets in a few minutes, and I had a bad time even lighting the newspaper in the bottom of my chimney to make more coals.

Aaarrrggghhh!

  Not to be flip my friend,  but if you got good results on the top of the bread and needed more time or heat to finish the bottom,  why not just flip the loaf over and add more coals to the top of the oven to finish it off ?   (no pun intended on the flip word)  :)
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2012, 09:30:31 AM »

... we eat a lot of oatmeal,  ...  but we are used to serving it creamy and a little loose,  for lack of a more discriptive word.
  Cream of Wheat is also a favorite around here,  and the wife and I both like it with lumps.  :)

....
FINALLY! Finally something we disagree on.
If you want a better description of runny oatmeal and Cream of Wheat, how about like something you'd find in a baby's diaper? 
Anybody for a nice bowl of Malt-o-Meal?   :puke:

  You'll notice I didn't say runny,  I said loose,  I don't drink it, I still use a spoon  :),  If it's takes effort to plant a spoon into my oatmeal it needs more milk.
  I like it so that I can stick a spoon in it and the spoon slowly leans over in the dish,  kind of like a pudding consistensy,  if I have to chew it for any length of time to get it down it's not oatmeal, it's calking,  and in some ways acts like it in my interior tubes,  if you get my meaning.
  Cream of wheat is good,  and the little occational lumps are like little sweet treats,  it's also good to keep around for filler in BP cartridge reloading for reduced loads,  right Wolfy.


Indeed it is and it meters better than cornmeal for that application, too :thumbsup:


As to the consistency of oatmeal......I was brought up on oatmeal that stood up in your bowl like a big gray lump of cold mashed potatoes :P.   That was the way my Dad liked it and I never knew anything different, until I saw someone get some in a restaurant one time and it was more the viscosity of gravy ???
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #34 on: November 11, 2012, 10:09:38 AM »
ROFLAO! Cream-o-Wheat = filler in shotgun shells. No wonder I don't eat the stuff. Hahahaha.
Hope everyone knows all this is just in jest.  ;D
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2012, 10:21:14 AM »
ROFLAO! Cream-o-Wheat = filler in shotgun shells. No wonder I don't eat the stuff. Hahahaha.
Hope everyone knows all this is just in jest.  ;D

  No,  we use cream of wheat in BP cartridges,  with BP the case has to be filled and the bullet seated firmly on top,  for a reduced load to save powder and reduce recoil,  the powder is loaded,  a thin paper wad or kapock is place on the power and the rest of the case is topped with cream of wheat.

  No,  the reason you don't eat cream or wheat is because you're just plain fussy,  the sooner you admit it the better you'll feel about it.   :)
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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #36 on: November 11, 2012, 10:36:05 AM »
....

  No,  the reason you don't eat cream or wheat is because you're just plain fussy,  the sooner you admit it the better you'll feel about it.   :)
If I want gooey little surprises in something smooth, I'll limit it to corn grits.  ;)
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #37 on: November 11, 2012, 11:09:31 AM »

... we eat a lot of oatmeal,  ...  but we are used to serving it creamy and a little loose,  for lack of a more descriptive word.
  Cream of Wheat is also a favorite around here,  and the wife and I both like it with lumps.  :)

....
FINALLY! Finally something we disagree on.
If you want a better description of runny oatmeal and Cream of Wheat, how about like something you'd find in a baby's diaper? 
Anybody for a nice bowl of Malt-o-Meal?   :puke:

  You'll notice I didn't say runny,  I said loose,  I don't drink it, I still use a spoon  :),  If it's takes effort to plant a spoon into my oatmeal it needs more milk.
  I like it so that I can stick a spoon in it and the spoon slowly leans over in the dish,  kind of like a pudding consistency,  if I have to chew it for any length of time to get it down it's not oatmeal, it's calking,  and in some ways acts like it in my interior tubes,  if you get my meaning.
  Cream of wheat is good,  and the little occasional lumps are like little sweet treats,  it's also good to keep around for filler in BP cartridge reloading for reduced loads,  right Wolfy.


Indeed it is and it meters better than cornmeal for that application, too :thumbsup:


As to the consistency of oatmeal......I was brought up on oatmeal that stood up in your bowl like a big gray lump of cold mashed potatoes :P.   That was the way my Dad liked it and I never knew anything different, until I saw someone get some in a restaurant one time and it was more the viscosity of gravy ???

   Same here as far as growing up with certain cultural differences in foods,  In my home both oatmeal and cream of wheat was served creamy and sweet,  when it's all you know, it's how you like it.
   Your restaurant story reminds me of one of the firsts in my wake up calls in life,  being a life long New Englander and having been brought up on cream of wheat (one of my first solid foods as an infant) I have a fondness for the stuff.
   After getting into law enforcement my Chief knowing my fondness for guns and shooting made me the dept. firearms instructor and armorer,  after my initial training and certification at the FBI academy I had to re-certify every year,  this was a week long stay at a government run shooting range that consisted of new updates on tactical training and teaching methods,  and full days of shooting,  and some hell raising after the guns were put away.
   The first few years it was held at a retired army machine gun range that had been turned over to the National Parks dept.,  well it seems that the park Rangers were not happy with the antics of fifty or so wild Police officers,  so the Boston office was politely told that they were no longer invited to hold their training sessions there any more.
   So we were shuffled off to Fort Devens for training,  at the old facility were were housed in a small open barracks facility and had to either eat out or provide our own food and cooking,  at Devens we were allowed to eat at the base cafeteria,  on the first morning we stood in line with the GI's ,  tray in hand and served ourselves from the many selections offered there for breakfast,  I took some scrambled eggs, bacon, hashbrowns, and a healty serving of cream of wheat.
  At the table there was cream, sugar, salt and pepper, butter and maple syurp,  so I put a dab of butter on my cream of wheat along with a tablespoon of sugar,  and a bit of cream, as I started to stir it up a soldier sitting across from me got a puzzled look on his face and said that was the first time he had ever seen anyone do that,  then he asked where I aquired a taste for cream and sugar on my "Grits".
  I answered a little dumbly that I'd always eaten them that way,  but from then on I grew to like Grits,  but with a little butter, salt and pepper,  at home I add chedder cheese and a little Cayenne pepper or hot sauce.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #38 on: November 11, 2012, 11:11:19 AM »
....

  No,  the reason you don't eat cream or wheat is because you're just plain fussy,  the sooner you admit it the better you'll feel about it.   :)
If I want gooey little surprises in something smooth, I'll limit it to corn grits.  ;)

  LOL, Please refer to post #37.
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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #39 on: November 11, 2012, 11:52:27 AM »

  LOL, Please refer to post #37.
Yeah, that's funny! I acquired a taste for grits (which I always heard was Southern fare) at a little truck stop near Franconian Notch in upstate New Hampshire. Loved 'em ever since. They are a primo excuse for eating salt and butter!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #40 on: November 11, 2012, 12:42:28 PM »

  LOL, Please refer to post #37.
Yeah, that's funny! I acquired a taste for grits (which I always heard was Southern fare) at a little truck stop near Franconian Notch in upstate New Hampshire. Loved 'em ever since. They are a primo excuse for eating salt and butter!

  Franconia Notch ?,  a little far East for you,  talk about getting twisted.   :)
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Offline SwampHanger

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2012, 12:44:58 PM »
Nice try, Professor :thumbsup:   Whenever I run into those conditions (and we often do) out here on the plains of Nebraska, I gain new respect for the old chuck wagon cooks who had to turn out enough sourdough biscuits to feed a batch of hungry cowboys each and every morning and evening on the trail drives :stir:   No wonder they had reputations as being crotchety >:(

Wind can be a real 'bugger' in D.O. baking, especially with briquettes, it always seems to me.  They don't really seem to be providing the lasting heat that good hardwood coals do.  The main coal-production fire itself seems to help a great deal in windy conditions......put ting the oven on the downwind side of a 'keyhole' or trench pit fire and rotating it frequently makes a big difference.   

We baked a 12# turkey in a big Texsport D.O. in the wind one time and we had to bank coals up on all sides of it to get sufficient heat.  It was kind of a blessing in disguise because I learned something in the process.  I always had trouble getting the sides of the legs and the wings roasted to a nice golden brown in that tall oven, but since then I learned that just bottom and top heat were not enough to get that picture-perfect all-over golden brown......side heat is necessary, too :P.   I am amazed at how quickly a 12# turkey roasts on a rack in a D.O., compared to our oven at home.  We've found that we can EASILY get one finished in just two hours or even less sometimes 8).   As near as I can figure, it must cook faster due to the moist heat from the cup or two of water in the bottom, the slight pressure-cooker effect, and the more even intensified heat from all sides of the cooking chamber :shrug:

I really wish you did pics sir. That sounds awesome and I learn more from seeing and doing than reading. I love reading your post . Thank you for your contributions.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #42 on: November 11, 2012, 12:50:48 PM »
  Franconia Notch ?,  a little far East for you,  talk about getting twisted.   :)
I spent a year and a half in Portsmouth. Killed my first ever white tail buck in the White Mountains.
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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #43 on: November 11, 2012, 12:59:04 PM »
  Franconia Notch ?,  a little far East for you,  talk about getting twisted.   :)
I spent a year and a half in Portsmouth. Killed my first ever white tail buck in the White Mountains.

  It's nice country,  a little hilly for my taste,  but better than Vermont,  I hunted Royalston and So. Royalston Vt. a couple of seasons,  but got tired of walking with one foot higher than the other one all the time.   :)
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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #44 on: November 11, 2012, 01:07:29 PM »
I spent a year and a half in Portsmouth. Killed my first ever white tail buck in the White Mountains.

  It's nice country,  a little hilly for my taste,  but better than Vermont,  I hunted Royalston and So. Royalston Vt. a couple of seasons,  but got tired of walking with one foot higher than the other one all the time.   :)
Hilly? Man, you'd hate it out here! Hahaha!
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Offline Professor

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #45 on: November 11, 2012, 01:55:59 PM »
Nice try, Professor :thumbsup:   Whenever I run into those conditions (and we often do) out here on the plains of Nebraska, I gain new respect for the old chuck wagon cooks who had to turn out enough sourdough biscuits to feed a batch of hungry cowboys each and every morning and evening on the trail drives :stir:   No wonder they had reputations as being crotchety >:(

Wind can be a real 'bugger' in D.O. baking, especially with briquettes, it always seems to me.  They don't really seem to be providing the lasting heat that good hardwood coals do.  The main coal-production fire itself seems to help a great deal in windy conditions......put ting the oven on the downwind side of a 'keyhole' or trench pit fire and rotating it frequently makes a big difference.   

We baked a 12# turkey in a big Texsport D.O. in the wind one time and we had to bank coals up on all sides of it to get sufficient heat.  It was kind of a blessing in disguise because I learned something in the process.  I always had trouble getting the sides of the legs and the wings roasted to a nice golden brown in that tall oven, but since then I learned that just bottom and top heat were not enough to get that picture-perfect all-over golden brown......side heat is necessary, too :P.   I am amazed at how quickly a 12# turkey roasts on a rack in a D.O., compared to our oven at home.  We've found that we can EASILY get one finished in just two hours or even less sometimes 8).   As near as I can figure, it must cook faster due to the moist heat from the cup or two of water in the bottom, the slight pressure-cooker effect, and the more even intensified heat from all sides of the cooking chamber :shrug:

I really wish you did pics sir. That sounds awesome and I learn more from seeing and doing than reading. I love reading your post . Thank you for your contributions.

Thanks!  I will post a Cornish hen in a Dutch in a few minutes that turned out pretty well.

As to yesterday's flop:  We didn't have a main fire.  We were in a neighbor's driveway and I was going to use briquettes for the heat source.  Usually, when it's windy, I head to the cabin and use the fireplace with a great supply of coals, plenty of side heat and no wind.

By the time I finally got the top of the bread brown, I had gone through most of my charcoal, and all of my patience!

All ended well.  The bread finished baking in the oven, and then I baked a pineapple upside-down cake, some cornbread, a Hot Fudge Pudding, and a cherry-pineapple dump cake.  At the same time, our friends cooked a 30-gallon kettle of "Burgoo" and so we had a major feast when it all was done!

Here's the Corning hen video now:  it just finished uploading!


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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #46 on: November 11, 2012, 02:16:31 PM »
Hey Prof, Thanks for the new video :thumbsup:    I noticed that you did your hen in a nice ol' spider.....where in the world did you find that?    I kind of like using them, too.....they're especially nice for use on the hearth, aren't they?   As they would be I guess, as that's what they were designed for, huh :shrug:    I have two of them, neither one of which are as deep as your 10".    One is a Birmingham 12" and the other I bought from Dixie Gun Works back in the early 70's.   It's a small, shallow 10" cast from an old mould to replicate one sold by Choteau, Berthold & Company back in the early fur trade days.....wish they still offered them :(
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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #47 on: November 11, 2012, 02:22:08 PM »
.....  At the same time, our friends cooked a 30-gallon kettle of "Burgoo" and so we had a major feast when it all was done!
...
Thanks for the vid!
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Offline Professor

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #48 on: November 11, 2012, 02:26:55 PM »
Here's the story on the spider: One day while I was building the cabin, my neighbor, Bob the Blacksmith showed up to monitor the building progress and brought me the spider.  He said I'd be needing it when the cabin was done!

It does a great job and I often use it for desserts; but last Friday, I had this little cornish hen thawed, and there were only the three of us, so I baked it in the spider.

Thanks for watching!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES
« Reply #49 on: November 11, 2012, 02:34:00 PM »
I spent a year and a half in Portsmouth. Killed my first ever white tail buck in the White Mountains.

  It's nice country,  a little hilly for my taste,  but better than Vermont,  I hunted Royalston and So. Royalston Vt. a couple of seasons,  but got tired of walking with one foot higher than the other one all the time.   :)
Hilly? Man, you'd hate it out here! Hahaha!

   LOL,  I meant the Notch,  one fall we took the kids leave peeping and camped out,  we had an unexpected unseasonable frost that iced up the stream we were camped next to,  we drove around most of the morning with the heater going in the pick up until the sun got over the "hills" (about 11:00 am),  that's hilly,  where I hunted in Vermont you were either walking up a 45 degree slope or down one,  even the game trails were a foot or more higher on one side than the other,  I don't mind hills,  cliffs are something else again.   :)

  That's one reason I liked hunting Maine,  the woods are thick but most elevations are gradual,  other parts of NH are great,  we had a weekend bushcraft outting in Deerfield just above Manchester a couple of weeks ago and the woods were real nice,  pretty open not flat but easy walking,  mostly spruce with some mixed hardwoods,  lots of deer signs and turkey and grouse.
  There was a good sized Beaver pond,  and probably some decent fishing for pan fish, perch and small bass.
  As for your country,  I'd need to brush up on horse back riding.   :)
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