Author Topic: Building a log home...we hope.  (Read 4918 times)

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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #50 on: September 06, 2017, 09:05:18 AM »
An update...

We've given up on Oregon.

Trying for New Mexico instead.

Heading back there in a few days hoping to buy a nice, undeveloped 30 acre lot south of Santa Fe.

Onward...

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #51 on: September 06, 2017, 09:23:41 AM »
Good luck in New Mexico. 

Might have to consider an adobe house.  I lived in one over fifty years ago and it is the best thing I ever lived in.  Warm in winter, cool in the summer.  Easy to maintain.  There is something about them that appeals to me beyond just the sticks and mud. 
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Offline Unknown

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #52 on: September 06, 2017, 01:03:29 PM »
An update...

We've given up on Oregon.

Trying for New Mexico instead.

Heading back there in a few days hoping to buy a nice, undeveloped 30 acre lot south of Santa Fe.

Onward...

That's a considerable change in scenery.

What are you looking for in a site? Undeveloped is cool if you want to be off-grid. The cost of getting utilities brought in can be a real bummer.
Best luck

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #53 on: September 06, 2017, 09:15:40 PM »
We'd been looking in Arizona and in New Mexico before we started looking in Oregon but yeah, it's quite a difference.

We're looking at some 30-40 acre lots in various states of development.

The biggest issue is of course water. We've looked at properties with and without wells. The presence of one greatly influences the asking price of course.

When we find the right place we'll be going adobe instead of the log cabin. There's no sense in fighting what's worked for hundreds of years in the New Mexico environment.

We leave next Thursday on what we're hoping will be a buying trip.

Onward...

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #54 on: September 23, 2017, 05:55:07 PM »
On our way home from New Mexico. Waiting for a plane.

We've narrowed down our choices considerably, it's between two 40 acre lots and one ten acre lot.

They all have existing wells.

Waiting to get some more info from our agent before we make an offer.

Onward...

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #55 on: September 23, 2017, 06:37:13 PM »
Are these near Sante Fe or further north?
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #56 on: September 24, 2017, 01:48:06 PM »
Are these near Sante Fe or further north?

Near Santa Fe.

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #57 on: October 01, 2017, 10:35:25 AM »
Well we've put in an offer on a 54 acre lot south of Santa Fe.

Now we wait...

Offline wolfy

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #58 on: October 01, 2017, 10:48:48 AM »
Do you have any pictures of that area? ???
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #59 on: October 01, 2017, 11:39:13 PM »
No I don't.

I've been there several times and know what it looks like but the only photos we've seen are in the property listing.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #60 on: October 02, 2017, 08:52:46 AM »
Do you have a link?  I promise not to try to outbid you. :rofl:
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #61 on: October 02, 2017, 09:14:23 AM »
I will, just as soon as we finish negotiatin...

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #62 on: October 21, 2017, 05:10:03 PM »
Looks like the 54 acre lot isn't gonna happen.

Been on and off the market for 10 years, never been built on, one of the previous owners put in a water meter, it's also got electrical and phone available.

Sellers can't decide what they want to do, offered to partially finance the sale then they reneged, counter-offer came in and they would barely budge on the price. Their own agent doesn't know what they want to do.

We've given them our absolute, bottom line cash offer which coincidentally is what property in and around the area is going for per acre, our agent also included language that basically says the only thing we'll consider further negotiating are some of our contingency costs. We're not gonna move on our Monday offer.

Get the feeling they're gonna turn us down again. I don't get why people list real estate for sale when they obviously aren't willing or able to actually sell it.  Makes no sense to me at all. We're the only people to ever put in an offer on the land in 10 years of listings.

We've given them until Monday to fish or cut bait.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #63 on: October 21, 2017, 09:02:48 PM »
The same thing is happening around here. People bought property (developed and undeveloped) 15-20 years ago and got taken to the cleaners. Now they're trying to sell it for 3x the current market value and won't budge on the price.
The timber industry tanked 7-8 years ago here, and the big Country Club never happened. There are subdivided "estate" parcels that no one can give away, but nobody can lower their prices because they're in over their heads already. The real estate investors have taken a bath over the last decade. They drove the market up with a false economy and false promises.  The smart ones left the area, leaving landscaped vacant lots and abandoned golf courses to the deer, bear and elk. 
Poor babies....
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #64 on: October 24, 2017, 07:46:48 PM »
And then...

We've heard back from the sellers.

They have tentatively accepted our cash offer as well as our various contingencies with a couple of their own. They want to close the deal in January, most likely for personal tax reasons and they wanted an assurance that we weren't acting on behalf of another buyer or as an agent?

Our agent thinks they've got a couple loose screws but we went ahead and stipulated that we are buying it for personal use even though we could theoretically sell it or give it away the minute we get the deed and while we'd hoped to get it done sooner, we agreed to set the closing date in January, on the date of our wedding anniversary as it turns out.

So barring more shenanigans from them, we'll be the new owners in a couple of months!

Still don't get why people make it so hard to give them money but...

Onward...

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #65 on: October 24, 2017, 07:47:51 PM »
Do you have a link?  I promise not to try to outbid you. :rofl:

Link will be available on January 5th...;^)

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #66 on: October 25, 2017, 08:52:00 AM »
The January closing makes sense as there is likely to be a smaller capital gains rate for 2018 that 2017 and if there isn't it puts a long delay in having to pay the tax.

The other two make no sense.  If you give verbal assurance it is for you own personal use and you are not acting as an agent they likely have no recourse even if you do sell it to a third party.  If it is a written assurance and you sell the property quickly they could very well file a suit should you change your mind and put the property on the market even though you would likely win in the end.  They may be trying to prevent someone that they had a problem with, or simply don't like, from making an end run on the property.  These kind of things are ridiculous but lots of strange stuff happens with people these days.   
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #67 on: October 26, 2017, 10:58:47 AM »
The January closing makes sense as there is likely to be a smaller capital gains rate for 2018 that 2017 and if there isn't it puts a long delay in having to pay the tax.

The other two make no sense.  If you give verbal assurance it is for you own personal use and you are not acting as an agent they likely have no recourse even if you do sell it to a third party.  If it is a written assurance and you sell the property quickly they could very well file a suit should you change your mind and put the property on the market even though you would likely win in the end.  They may be trying to prevent someone that they had a problem with, or simply don't like, from making an end run on the property.  These kind of things are ridiculous but lots of strange stuff happens with people these days.   

The last part is what we're thinking is going on. I thought my agents head was gonna explode while he was explaining what they wanted. Ironically, had they taken one of our other offers they would have gotten more money out of us by financing a portion of the sale which would have given them the power to stop us from re-selling at least until the financing was paid off. Their original listing stated that they were "motivated sellers willing to finance" which turned out not to be the case at all. We offered them what our and their agent agreed was a very fair offer for more than we just agreed to pay them but they turned that offer down...because it turns out they didn't really want to finance anything.

Onward to the lawyers office for legal review...

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #68 on: November 10, 2017, 12:36:32 PM »
Slowly but surely...

Learned from a 3rd party that there are water lines running across our property that weren't disclosed...

When we informed the sellers agent the seller suddenly remembered that yes, they did run some  water lines to an adjoining property across our right of way, in fact they ran one to our proposed building site too!

I'm amazed once again at how people who are supposedly trying to sell us this land continue to come up with reasons for us to cancel the transaction and walk away.

They've already let it be known that they are in real need of the cash we've offered yet they continue to hinder getting it.

Onward...


Offline hayshaker

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #69 on: November 11, 2017, 06:15:48 AM »
mabey you need to do a thourough searh at the county permit office
for any other surprizes

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #70 on: November 11, 2017, 10:50:29 AM »
We're doing as much searching as we can considering we're in California.  Our agent and local attorney are doing a good job of keeping up with the sellers shenanigans so far.

I'm trying to wrap my head around the idea that the seller could simply forget that they installed water lines to two separate properties that would have cost a few thousand dollars as well as some excavating work when it was time to disclose the info but suddenly remember when we told them we were ready to walk away with our deposit. Now they've not only remembered they offered to draw us a map with the location of the water pipes...

Onward...


Offline wolfy

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #71 on: November 11, 2017, 11:25:18 AM »
Have you ever talked to the seller personally, or are you letting the agent and lawyer act as 'go-betweens' for you? :shrug:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #72 on: November 11, 2017, 11:53:17 AM »
Water lines, unless they are privately owned and even then it is rare, have to have a right of way or easement and the title policy should have shown this.  Did you get a title policy?
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #73 on: November 11, 2017, 01:22:14 PM »
Have you ever talked to the seller personally, or are you letting the agent and lawyer act as 'go-betweens' for you? :shrug:

I'd like to but they're incredibly hard to reach even for their own agent.

They live a couple hundred miles from us so it's not easy for us to talk.


Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #74 on: November 11, 2017, 01:29:34 PM »
Water lines, unless they are privately owned and even then it is rare, have to have a right of way or easement and the title policy should have shown this.  Did you get a title policy?

We are in the process of doing that, that's why all this stuff is coming to light.

New Mexico hasn't got what I would call "normal" disclosure laws. The seller isn't required to tell us anything that isn't basically life threatening, they can answer our questions or try to explain why things are the way they are but they can also choose not to even respond. It's a different sorta place, our attorney warned us that it's still the Wild West in regards to land and water rights, that's why we hired him.

The water lines were privately installed at least 10 years ago. Our fear is that if they do in fact run under our property that we might have a problem when we go to build or excavate. We've been told that they run alongside the road but the person who says that also "forgot" that they'd been installed at all.

It's been an educational experience so far...

Onward...

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #75 on: November 11, 2017, 04:00:03 PM »
...
New Mexico hasn't got what I would call "normal" disclosure laws. The seller isn't required to tell us anything that isn't basically life threatening, they can answer our questions or try to explain why things are the way they are but they can also choose not to even respond. It's a different sorta place, our attorney warned us that it's still the Wild West in regards to land and water rights, that's why we hired him.
..

It might sound a little crass, but we see this quite a bit out here in Montana when folks resettle from a relatively urban location, usually from out-of-state.
A LOT of us moved from "citified" environs to places like Montana, Wyoming, Arizona, N. Mexico to get away from the dictates of society imposed by politicians and attorneys. So, yeah, there is a bit of culture shock when dealing with the way things get handled in rural areas.

I don't believe the sellers are trying to "get away with something", I'm more ready to believe that these details are (and always have been) unimportant to them.

When I moved to Montana, I came from a relatively urban area in a very strict State. I wanted to make sure I wasn't going to get into trouble with local laws and codes.
I wanted to tear down and rebuild a decrepit old back porch. I inquired about a building permit. I went to Town Hall and inquired about permits. The reaction I got was a wide-eyed stare, followed by, "Permit? For what?"  When I told them, the answer I got was that building permits were only required for new construction. What I found out later was that meant that if you wanted to replace your existing house with a new one, you built new walls all around your old ones, and then tore down the old ones. No permits required.
We moved a mobile home onto the property. I asked about the "green belt" (the distance a structure must be from the property line). Again, I got "Huh?".
After a few moments of mulling over my question, the official answer was, "As long as you can get your lawnmower between the house and the fence, I guess it's okay."

Welcome to Life in the West.   :shocked:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #76 on: November 11, 2017, 05:10:11 PM »
It used to be that way on permits where we live.  Then some smart ass in the building department figured out they were missing a revenue source.  Now you need a permit.   :P
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #77 on: November 11, 2017, 05:14:52 PM »
It used to be that way on permits where we live.  Then some smart ass in the building department figured out they were missing a revenue source.  Now you need a permit.   :P
We don't even have a Building Department in our Town. It's all handled through the County, and State.
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #78 on: November 11, 2017, 08:09:06 PM »
...
New Mexico hasn't got what I would call "normal" disclosure laws. The seller isn't required to tell us anything that isn't basically life threatening, they can answer our questions or try to explain why things are the way they are but they can also choose not to even respond. It's a different sorta place, our attorney warned us that it's still the Wild West in regards to land and water rights, that's why we hired him.
..

It might sound a little crass, but we see this quite a bit out here in Montana when folks resettle from a relatively urban location, usually from out-of-state.
A LOT of us moved from "citified" environs to places like Montana, Wyoming, Arizona, N. Mexico to get away from the dictates of society imposed by politicians and attorneys. So, yeah, there is a bit of culture shock when dealing with the way things get handled in rural areas.

I don't believe the sellers are trying to "get away with something", I'm more ready to believe that these details are (and always have been) unimportant to them.

When I moved to Montana, I came from a relatively urban area in a very strict State. I wanted to make sure I wasn't going to get into trouble with local laws and codes.
I wanted to tear down and rebuild a decrepit old back porch. I inquired about a building permit. I went to Town Hall and inquired about permits. The reaction I got was a wide-eyed stare, followed by, "Permit? For what?"  When I told them, the answer I got was that building permits were only required for new construction. What I found out later was that meant that if you wanted to replace your existing house with a new one, you built new walls all around your old ones, and then tore down the old ones. No permits required.
We moved a mobile home onto the property. I asked about the "green belt" (the distance a structure must be from the property line). Again, I got "Huh?".
After a few moments of mulling over my question, the official answer was, "As long as you can get your lawnmower between the house and the fence, I guess it's okay."

Welcome to Life in the West.   :shocked:

I'm a live and let live guy for the most part but there have been too many issues cropping up for me to believe it's all just circumstance. I don't think I've mentioned the fact that the seller "forgot" that there was a well on the property as well as the water lines. Not to mention they tried to use a survey and covenants that were out of date and incorrect.

We're very hopeful that we'll get all this worked out and be happy in our eventual home but I don't believe for an instant that the sellers are as forgetful as they're acting, their own agent has expressed concerns about their actions. Maybe I'm a little gun shy because the previous owners of my current house were caught committing bank and real estate fraud in the midst of our sale but I'm simply looking after our interests as best I can.

Onward...

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #79 on: November 11, 2017, 08:28:53 PM »
They didn't tell you there was a well on the property? Where did they tell you your water came from? Property with an established well is a lot more valuable than without, considering the cost of drilling one.
An acquaintance in Colorado pointed out two pieces of pasture land. He said one was worth $11K because it had no available water on it. The other he said was $45K because it had a creek running through it.
The average depth of a well in my neighborhood is 350 feet. That don't come cheap. If the land you're bargaining for has a good well, it floors me that the sellers didn't make a point of that in their asking price.
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #80 on: November 11, 2017, 10:12:19 PM »
They didn't tell you there was a well on the property? Where did they tell you your water came from? Property with an established well is a lot more valuable than without, considering the cost of drilling one.
An acquaintance in Colorado pointed out two pieces of pasture land. He said one was worth $11K because it had no available water on it. The other he said was $45K because it had a creek running through it.
The average depth of a well in my neighborhood is 350 feet. That don't come cheap. If the land you're bargaining for has a good well, it floors me that the sellers didn't make a point of that in their asking price.

Now you know how I feel... ;D

They also "forgot" that the survey they wanted to use was inaccurate, that there isn't an electrical line running to the property as they stated and a few other things. 

The well is on a part of the property that was sold off AFTER the survey they tried to use was drawn up, it only became known about when we were asked to sign off on some covenants that had information about sharing the well with another property in it. Not a word from the sellers even though we specifically asked about all the possible water rights and availability from the very start of the purchase process.

It's funny, I don't think that the sellers are really trying to run a scam, if they are it's a mystery as to what they think they're getting away with as they turned down an offer we made a few days ago which would have netted them more money. I'm just not sure what they're trying to accomplish by failing to tell us about some fairly important things, like the existence of water on the property. I don't see any upside for them to be behaving the way they are.

My wife is pretty determined that we get this property so we're going to persevere.

Onward...


Offline wolfy

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #81 on: November 11, 2017, 10:52:03 PM »
If you intend to run an electric line to this property, you had better beware that it is VERY expensive!  If you think a well is big-buck item, take a deep breath before adding electrical service! :doh:
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #82 on: November 11, 2017, 11:21:49 PM »
If you intend to run an electric line to this property, you had better beware that it is VERY expensive!  If you think a well is big-buck item, take a deep breath before adding electrical service! :doh:

At the rate we're goin I expect to find a 200 amp electrical source that they "forgot" to tell us about... ;D

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #83 on: November 12, 2017, 08:53:38 AM »
This whole deal smells bad.  Given what you have shared with us on this thread I would not buy this piece of property.  The whole package on a piece of vacant ground should not have taken two hours to put together.  Their realtor is quite remiss and so is yours and your attorney. 

The price of extending electrical will astound you if it is more than a  few feet.  In addition there are negotiation points on hooking on, additional users wanting to attach to the line, and whether it is overhead or underground.  Be very careful.

The cost of drilling, piping, and pressurizing a well can run from $10,000 to $50,000 (or more) depending on the depth and the geologic conditions encountered.  There are also permits and applications that may prevent you from drilling at all.  You need that resolved before you close on the ground.  Water quality issues can result in a well being unfit for human use.

You need a title insurance policy and it better include everything about that land that is of public record.  Given the mystery water lines and missing shared well information this would kill the deal for me at this point.

Your whole experience with this piece of ground is strange, to say the least.  Weird seller, strange real estate people, no forceful input from your attorney.  Just strange. 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #84 on: November 12, 2017, 09:11:26 AM »
Yeah, nothing about this property would surprise me at this point......it might even turn out to be a sacred Indian burial ground!  :doh:
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #85 on: November 12, 2017, 09:28:41 AM »
Yeah, nothing about this property would surprise me at this point......it might even turn out to be a sacred Indian burial ground!  :doh:

Well you're close...there's a cemetery on the adjacent lot.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #86 on: November 12, 2017, 09:32:41 AM »
Yeah, nothing about this property would surprise me at this point......it might even turn out to be a sacred Indian burial ground!  :doh:

Well you're close...there's a cemetery on the adjacent lot.
So, there is a possibility of it being haunted by zombies, too? :rofl:
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Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #87 on: November 12, 2017, 09:48:34 AM »
This whole deal smells bad.  Given what you have shared with us on this thread I would not buy this piece of property.  The whole package on a piece of vacant ground should not have taken two hours to put together.  Their realtor is quite remiss and so is yours and your attorney. 

The price of extending electrical will astound you if it is more than a  few feet.  In addition there are negotiation points on hooking on, additional users wanting to attach to the line, and whether it is overhead or underground.  Be very careful.

The cost of drilling, piping, and pressurizing a well can run from $10,000 to $50,000 (or more) depending on the depth and the geologic conditions encountered.  There are also permits and applications that may prevent you from drilling at all.  You need that resolved before you close on the ground.  Water quality issues can result in a well being unfit for human use.

You need a title insurance policy and it better include everything about that land that is of public record.  Given the mystery water lines and missing shared well information this would kill the deal for me at this point.

Your whole experience with this piece of ground is strange, to say the least.  Weird seller, strange real estate people, no forceful input from your attorney.  Just strange.

I appreciate your concerns. The overall problem is that we're in the process of getting title insurance, all of the issues that have come up have been part of that process.

We can walk away at any point without losing our deposit, we insisted on including that provision in our offer.

We've also stipulated that we can walk away if our attorney raises an objection or finds something legally amiss.

Our attorney has been advising us throughout the process and he's of the opinion that so far everything that's come up can be resolved if we want the land.

This is what I was referring to when I wrote about the different ways they have in New Mexico in regards to selling land. The buyer makes an offer and then once you're under contract as we are, all the weird and wacky stuff starts to be revealed, then the seller has to address all the problems or ignore them and the buyers decide whether to keep moving forward or not.  It's a real caveat emptor kinda place. In California the seller must disclose every kind of issue first then you take that into account when making your offer, in NM you make an offer, find out a bunch of stuff and then settle somewhere else on the sales price or just walk away.

I don't think anyone is being remiss per se, the owners are a bit eccentric and hard to deal with and I'm unhappy with their memory issues but I think it's more the state of New Mexico has some very interesting ideas of how land is sold. Our agent told us going in that we had a 50/50 chance of working everything out. He also warned us that buying land from a long time owner with multiple generations of owners is always hard. Turns out he was absolutely right. Having said that, we've let our agent as well as theirs know that we're perfectly happy to walk away if it gets too weird. They need to sell the land more than we need to buy it. We're working on a 2 year plan from taking possession to building and moving there.p, they need the money now.

Onward...



Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #88 on: November 12, 2017, 02:12:16 PM »
Not that it's any consolation, but a similar thing happened to us with some property near Orifino, ID.
Saw the pictures in the listing. Made an appointment to see the land. Drove all the way from western WA to look at it.
Turns out the land was on top of a ridge above the river. 1500' climb on a gravel road. I just about fell off the side of the mountain in my Suburban, and that was in GOOD weather, no ice, snow or rain.
The picture of the "house" was from the best possible angle. It was a 3 room shack. Besides the access issues, it turns out the "well on property" was a shared well. That's a nightmare waiting to happen even on the best day.  There was power run to the house, but a few phone calls and we found out the power had been disconnected at the feeder box for the area because the line had been "condemned", and would need to be replaced. Estimated cost to run a new line 1/4 mile was $1500.
I did a layman's "building inspection" while there. All the circa 1920's wiring in the house was dual feed (you know...the kind with cloth insulation and ceramic insulators in the un-insulated attic crawl space?). The foundation was post-and-pier, which means no VA or FHA inspection would pass it, and no lender would touch it. So the house itself was was worthless as far as the value of the property was concerned. That meant we would need to build, or move in a modular home. Good luck with THAT, considering the switch-back road up the mountain.  At least we had a nice road trip cross-country to remember. Haha.

During our process of searching for land to buy, I learned a lot about "real estate-ese" language.  I discovered that "20 private sun-drenched acres" in Eastern Washington meant the property was on a bald ridge (no trees), and no road or easement access.
The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline JohnE

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #89 on: November 13, 2017, 04:39:59 PM »
Things might be looking up.

If we can settle the water lines location and the electrical source/location it's looking pretty good.

We've asked the seller to include the cost of locating the water lines in the survey review which they've already agreed to pay for. We've also asked them to show where the electrical lines are that they claim are at the property

They've agreed to extend the various inspection deadlines, a couple of which were supposed to be today.

We'll see what happens in the next couple of days.

Onward...

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #90 on: November 14, 2017, 12:00:21 AM »
My wife and I got burned by some sellers back when we were house shopping. We paid for an inspection and then the sellers backed out after they learned what needed fixing.

Our tiny rural town of 1500 people or so has decided to adopt the nearby city's ordinances so we will have all of the inconvenience of living away from town with all of the restrictions now. Ticks me off.

I have a couple of small lots in New Mexico in some junk subdivision my wife bought on eBay, another in Colorado, and 20 acres in Nevada that we paid only $4K for and keep getting lowball offers on in the mail a few times a year. They are going to have to at least come up to our price plus a little to cover the taxes we've paid over the years. I'd sell the 20 acres right now for five thousand. But they are in an undeveloped area. Easy access, but just dry scrub land and no trees. 20 acres somewhere nice is going to run ten times as much.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #91 on: November 14, 2017, 08:24:21 AM »
when I was working in New Mexico back in the 60's there were people selling land out in the desert west of Taos and north towards the Colorado border.  They would advertise in magazines.  I forget the price or the size of the parcels but these were out in the area where there was no power and no water.  Wells were deep.  They would take a bulldozer and just grade "roads" around the perimeter and some of the interior and then survey the lots with flags on stakes. 

I saw one person living on this kind of land.  This was before the big hippie movement into New Mexico in the later part of the 60's but I never went back to see if anything ever was built besides that one shack. 
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Building a log home...we hope.
« Reply #92 on: November 14, 2017, 03:50:51 PM »
.... I'd sell the 20 acres right now for five thousand. But they are in an undeveloped area. Easy access, but just dry scrub land and no trees. 20 acres somewhere nice is going to run ten times as much.

In beautiful NW Montana, 20 acres of undeveloped timberland will run you that 10x....per acre!

The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.