Author Topic: Crawdad trapping  (Read 1228 times)

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Offline flatlander88

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Crawdad trapping
« on: June 30, 2017, 07:49:08 PM »
Ok. Stayed in to get this done. This was our first time trapping like this so tips would be good:) 

Edit: video isn't showing up? The insert link icons are not working...I'll keeping trying but just added a video to my youtube, buckskin88


« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 07:57:02 PM by flatlander88 »

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2017, 08:43:57 PM »
Nice video. I especially like the underwater shots!
Our favorite crawdadin' method is after dark with a dim flash light wading in shallow water. Catch 'em by hand. 3 adults and 4 kids can fill a 5 gal bucket in about 2 hours.  Most of them we catch are in 6"-8" of water.
The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2017, 11:26:54 PM »
Good video.  Never thought about Colorado as a crayfish trapping possibility. 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline flatlander88

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2017, 07:26:08 AM »
Nice video. I especially like the underwater shots!
Our favorite crawdadin' method is after dark with a dim flash light wading in shallow water. Catch 'em by hand. 3 adults and 4 kids can fill a 5 gal bucket in about 2 hours.  Most of them we catch are in 6"-8" of water.


Dang, that's a lot of crawdads quick! We found the shallower the better in the lake we were at.

Offline flatlander88

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2017, 07:28:30 AM »
Good video.  Never thought about Colorado as a crayfish trapping possibility.

Thanks! Colorado must have a ton of them.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2017, 09:38:25 AM »
My wife lived in CO for awhile. She's said on more than one occasion that she wished the Montana crayfish were as big as those in Colorado.
The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2017, 09:52:40 AM »
I grew up in Colorado and we fished for crawdads by tying a string around a small piece of baloney.  Toss the baloney out and wait until you got a tug, then slowly pull it in.  Slow but effective.  Crawdads never became a major part of my diet but we did eat them.
I guess he'd rather be in Colorado.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2017, 11:05:14 AM »
Good thread!

With the OP's permission, I can post a couple pix of our last "expedition".
The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline flatlander88

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2017, 11:17:05 AM »
Good thread!

With the OP's permission, I can post a couple pix of our last "expedition".

Absolutely!!

Online wolfy

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2017, 11:30:41 AM »
 :stir: :drool:  Mmmmm.....suck 'dem HAY-uds!  ;D
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2017, 11:58:32 AM »
I don't trap them but there are a lot of them in the irrigation ditch that supplies the pipeline we use to flood irrigate our place.  When out changing gates there will be twenty or thirty at times laying around in the water in front of the pipe.  A lot of them get eaten by the the seagulls that show up when we run the water.  I think if we put one of those traps in the ditch that goes to our headgate we could fill it up in no time.  This only lasts a couple of weeks and usually the first two weeks the ditch is turned on.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline hayshaker

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2017, 01:12:18 PM »
remember cradads are just baby lobsters,
i once saw a maine lobster in hawaii at a restaurant.
they had it in a fishtank about 100'gal size. the small card
rea that it was around 70'yrs old. it was 3'ft long the tail ws about 9'in wide.
no it was not for sale buta small tourist draw i guess.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2017, 04:28:14 PM »
Good thread!

With the OP's permission, I can post a couple pix of our last "expedition".

Absolutely!!

One evening's haul.....



The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2017, 07:29:14 PM »
Haymaker, are you sure?  Lobsters live in salt water, crawdads live in fresh water.
I guess he'd rather be in Colorado.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2017, 09:00:36 PM »
Haymaker, are you sure?  Lobsters live in salt water, crawdads live in fresh water.
When my BIL worked for a high-end grocery outlet, they had a salt water tank with live lobster.  Sold quite a few, as I recall.  If you throw 'em in the pot yourself, you know they're fresh. ;)
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2017, 02:52:48 PM »
I grew up in Louisiana so catching crawfish there is pretty easy. You can find them pretty much everywhere.

The easiest way to catch them is using crawfish nets. These are tarred nets with about 1/2" mesh about 18" square. They sit flat on the bottom, and two wire hoops hold it open and stand up about 20" high with a little piece of surveyor's tape or bright colored ribbon at the top. You set these in shallow water with a bit of bait tied in the center. We used chicken necks and backs cut into smaller pieces.

The crawfish are collected in plastic baskets that look like laundry baskets but with smaller holes to keep the crawfish in. With 20 nets in a good area, by the time you set out your last net, the first one has a handful of crawfish in it. If you go through 3 or 4 times checking all the nets, you can fill up a basket in under an hour.

But out west here things are different. The crawfish are a different species and harvesting methods would necessarily be different. The rules in my state require you to kill them before taking them away from the stream or lake where they are caught, presumably to prevent introducing them as an invasive species in other streams or lakes. This means you can't catch a bunch and then bring them home to boil them legally. You have to boil them where you catch them.

Offline flatlander88

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2017, 04:50:16 PM »
That's cool! By any chance do you have a pic or a link so I can see those nets that sit on the bottom? Colorado has the same rules about killing them before transport but the park ranger let us keep them in a basket for the day while we were running the line. Cleaned them at the end of each day.


I grew up in Louisiana so catching crawfish there is pretty easy. You can find them pretty much everywhere.

The easiest way to catch them is using crawfish nets. These are tarred nets with about 1/2" mesh about 18" square. They sit flat on the bottom, and two wire hoops hold it open and stand up about 20" high with a little piece of surveyor's tape or bright colored ribbon at the top. You set these in shallow water with a bit of bait tied in the center. We used chicken necks and backs cut into smaller pieces.

The crawfish are collected in plastic baskets that look like laundry baskets but with smaller holes to keep the crawfish in. With 20 nets in a good area, by the time you set out your last net, the first one has a handful of crawfish in it. If you go through 3 or 4 times checking all the nets, you can fill up a basket in under an hour.

But out west here things are different. The crawfish are a different species and harvesting methods would necessarily be different. The rules in my state require you to kill them before taking them away from the stream or lake where they are caught, presumably to prevent introducing them as an invasive species in other streams or lakes. This means you can't catch a bunch and then bring them home to boil them legally. You have to boil them where you catch them.

Offline hayshaker

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2017, 05:14:05 PM »
QC, i ment that as a joke in regards to crawfish bieing little lobsters.
i was trying to make a funny.

Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2017, 07:24:35 PM »
Sorry. 
I guess he'd rather be in Colorado.
-John Denver

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2017, 01:59:46 AM »
That's cool! By any chance do you have a pic or a link so I can see those nets that sit on the bottom? Colorado has the same rules about killing them before transport but the park ranger let us keep them in a basket for the day while we were running the line. Cleaned them at the end of each day.


I grew up in Louisiana so catching crawfish there is pretty easy. You can find them pretty much everywhere.

The easiest way to catch them is using crawfish nets. These are tarred nets with about 1/2" mesh about 18" square. They sit flat on the bottom, and two wire hoops hold it open and stand up about 20" high with a little piece of surveyor's tape or bright colored ribbon at the top. You set these in shallow water with a bit of bait tied in the center. We used chicken necks and backs cut into smaller pieces.

The crawfish are collected in plastic baskets that look like laundry baskets but with smaller holes to keep the crawfish in. With 20 nets in a good area, by the time you set out your last net, the first one has a handful of crawfish in it. If you go through 3 or 4 times checking all the nets, you can fill up a basket in under an hour.

But out west here things are different. The crawfish are a different species and harvesting methods would necessarily be different. The rules in my state require you to kill them before taking them away from the stream or lake where they are caught, presumably to prevent introducing them as an invasive species in other streams or lakes. This means you can't catch a bunch and then bring them home to boil them legally. You have to boil them where you catch them.

It's hard to link from my phone but an internet search for crawfish nets should pop up several sites. They work for crawfish that are more interested in clinging to the bait than escaping. I've caught blue crabs using just a piece of chicken and a fishing net. You slowly bring the line up to just under the surface and scoop the net under the crab. If you get them all the way to the surface the crab will let go and swim away. But purpose made crab nets that use two hoops and lay flat on the bottom work well too. Anyway the point is if these cold water Western crawfish aren't as tenacious, a trap might work better than the nets do on the southern varieties.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2017, 04:26:13 PM »
Crab vs. Crayfish:

We always caught Dungenes crab in the eel grass while drifting with the tide in a boat.  Nets were shallow dishes made of chicken wire on long bamboo poles. You'd drift along in a few feet of water, and wait to spook a crab from one patch of grass to another.  Scoop..flip...in the boat.  Fun times!  For serious trapping, I always used a cage trap set in deep water with a buoy.  Check every 24 hrs.
Some of my relatives used hand-operated traps for crabs at the mouth of the Deschutes River in Oregon.  They would lower them off a bridge, or pier, have a brew or two, and then pull them up.  A good catch was 3 at a time.
This illustration doesn't show the rigging, but it's basically 4 lines tied to the points and then to a ring in the center. The line to the surface hooks to the ring. When you pull the trap up, the sides fold up and trap the feasting beasties.
I'm pretty sure it would work for crawdads, if you snatched it off the bottom fast enough.

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Offline flatlander88

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Re: Crawdad trapping
« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2017, 05:37:23 AM »
Great info OP! Thank you