Author Topic: Just Recipes  (Read 47343 times)

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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Just Recipes
« on: March 12, 2012, 11:26:12 AM »
Post your recipes in this thread. You are welcome to start a thread to discuss a recipe. If you want it to be easily found, post it here as well. Please limit posts in this thread to recipes only, and discuss the recipes in their own threads.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Low Carb BBQ Sauce Recipe
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2012, 10:28:57 PM »
Low Carb BBQ Sauce Recipe
by Half Axe

This recipe was given to me by a friend.  A tablespoon of this sauce has about 3 g of carbs compared to the 9 to 15 g you find in commercial sauces.

2 T butter
1 clove garlic or 1 t garlic powder
1/4 c. finely chopped onion or 1 T dried minced onion
1 T lemon juice
1 c. tomato sauce
1/3 c. Splenda
1 T molasses
2 T Worcestershire sauce
1 T chili powder
1 T vinegar
1 t coarse ground black pepper
1/4 t salt

Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan and bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer for 5 -10 minutes, stirring occasionally; remove from heat and let stand.  I usually double the batch and keep some in a pint canning jar with lid in the fridge - it will keep for a couple of months, but it rarely lasts that long at my house.

I use the sauce to make BBQ Beef or Venison.  I take a 3 lb. beef or venison roast, tenderize it with a fork, season with salt and pepper, coat with olive oil, place in a cast iron pot with lid, and cook in the oven at 250oF for 4 to 5 hours, until the internal temperature reaches 195oF.  Use two forks to shred the meat, then mix the sauce in to a good consistency - meat well covered, but not runny.  I haven't tried this recipe with pork, but others have reported to me that it is very good for pulled pork.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Rosemary Rice
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2012, 10:32:34 PM »
Rosemary Rice
By Old Philosopher

I have to throw this recipe in the mix. It's my son's favorite way to fix rice.

1 cu              -- long grain rice (not instant)
2 1/4            -- cu water
1 - 1 1/2 Tbs -- fresh rosemary leaves, slightly chopped, not too small
2 tsp             --cooking oil, or 1 Tbs shortening

All measurements except the rice and water are just guidelines.

In a sauce pan (or billy) heat the oil until it starts to swirl.
Toss in the rosemary and give it just a second to sizzle and toast. (don't burn it!)
Toss in the rice. Stir constantly until the rice is coated with the oil, hot throughout, and begins to toast, or becomes transparent.
Toss in the cold water and stand back! It's going to sputter. The cold water hits the hot rice and cracks the grains. This tenderizes the grains, and lets them absorb more water.
Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring to avoid sticking to the bottom of the pan.
Cover tightly and move the pan to low heat where the temperature will stay just below a low simmer.
Let it sit there for 30-40 minutes to steam.
Remove from the heat, remove the lid, fluff the rice with a fork and replace the cover until ready to eat.
Salt, butter and pepper to taste.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Garlic/Dill Pasta
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2012, 05:57:19 PM »
One of my favorite snacks, or side dishes. I learned this recipe with dill and pepper only, but added the garlic to suite my taste buds.

Garlic/Dill Pasta

1 10oz-12oz package (~2 cu) of garden rotini pasta (the spiral stuff with differnt flavors/colors)
1 Tbs dill weed (more, or less to taste)
2 tsp dry granulated garlic (again, to taste)
Fresh cracked black pepper/Salt (to taste)
1 cup (approx) mayonaise

Cook the pasta per package directions until al dente. Rinse under cold water to stop the cooking and cool the pasta. Place in a mixing bowl and add the mayonaise a bit at a time. Toss to coat. Add more mayo until it's just slightly wetter than you think is enough, because the pasta will absorb some liquid after sitting. Don't be afraid to go over the 1 cup suggestion, either. Add the dill weed, and garlic and mix throughly without breaking up the pasta. Add the pepper a pinch at a time until you get the taste you want. Add a good pinch of salt, but don't over do it. Let your guests salt and pepper more to suit their own tastes.

Most all of my recipes are going to be "to taste", because that's how I cook. Recipe quantities are a guide, and more or less of something is a matter of personal taste. A recipe that calls for "3 cloves of garlic" usually gets 5, or 6 in our household.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2012, 05:59:14 PM by Old Philosopher »
The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline Yeoman

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2012, 06:46:32 PM »
Pea Soup for Camping (makes 1-2 servings)
This is a favourite of mine when out in chilly weather.
I normally cook this up in a small coffee can or in a 2L camping pot on a low fire.

1/2 Cup split yellow peas
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground cumin
3 whole cloves garlic
4 pieces of bacon frozen
3-5 cups water

At home: place first four ingredients in a zip lock bag and put the frozen bacon in a separate bag inside the first bag.

At the camp site, boil 3 cups water using your preferred method. Cube the bacon and add it to the water and bring back to a boil. Add the remaining ingredients and return to boil again. Simmer the soup for 30-60 minutes adding water as necessary. Stir occasionally. it is ready when the peas are soft and it reaches the consistency of semi-runny oatmeal.

"Learning is an interruption of the failure process"
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2012, 07:47:18 PM »
This is a recipe I sort of came up with on my own. It's an amalgam of several gumbo recipes. "gumbo" is an African word, meaning "okra". But this recipe instead uses file' powder to thicken it at the table, rather than okra in the ingredients. Purists will insist that if it doesn't have okra, it isn't gumbo. However the French Creoles in the country north of New Orleans made gumbo without okra all the time.

Anyhow, here goes...

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

Ingredients
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup vegetable oil (or bacon grease)
1 bell pepper chopped
1 onion chopped
2-3 stalks celery chopped
2 medium boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut into 1" pieces
1 lb. smoked sausage cut into 1/4" thick rounds
1 bay leaf
2 small to medium cloves garlic, minced or pressed
Chicken stock - 2 or more cups
Tony Chachere's creole seasoning
salt and pepper to taste
Gumbo file' powder
Cayenne pepper
long grain white rice

Start by chopping your "trinity" of onions, bell pepper and celery, then put them together in a bowl and set them aside, along with the minced garlic. Then in a big cast iron skillet, brown the chicken and sausage well, and set aside.

In a big pot, add flour and oil (or bacon grease) and over medium-high heat, keep stirring until the flour turns chocolate brown. This is making a roux. You have to stir constantly or it will burn and you'll need to start over. Any black flecks of burnt flour will ruin the flavor.

As soon as the roux gets close to the chocolate brown color, add in the chopped vegetables. This will help prevent the roux from burning. Keep the vegetables moving in the pot just to be safe, for another 30 seconds to a minute. You want them to wilt and glaze a little. They will smell just awesome at this point.

After the veggies have wilted some, then you can add 2 cups of chicken stock, and then the chicken and sausage, and the bay leaf. Also add about 2 level teaspoons of the Tony Chachere's creole seasoning, and add about 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper. If you need more liquid, add just enough to barely cover the contents of the pot. You want them all to be wet, but not so much as to thin out the soup too much. Let this simmer on medium-low heat for an hour. After an hour, taste it and add Tony's seasoning until the heat level is to your liking, then add salt until the salt level is to your liking. Before serving, skim off the excess oil from the surface. Oxo makes a great oil separator for the purpose that is a lot easier than trying to scoop it all up with a spoon. Remove and discard the bay leaf.

While the gumbo is simmering for an hour, you can start your rice so it will be ready when the gumbo is done.

To serve, use wide brimmed soup bowls and place a scoop of white rice in the center of the bowl, then ladle the gumbo around the outside. You can sprinkle about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of file powder onto the gumbo, and a little more on the brim of the bowl and the top of the rice for a garnish. Do the same with a tiny bit of cayenne pepper for color.

This is best served with some french bread garlic toast.

This same recipe can be modified by eliminating the sausage, and using a lot less chicken stock. The chicken breasts are increased from 2 to 4. Brown them as before and set aside. Make the roux in a deep skillet instead of a pot. When the roux is ready, add the veggies and then just enough chicken stock to keep from burning, then simmer covered over low heat for an hour until the chicken is fully cooked and tender. Taste and season as before. Serve this over rice and you'll have a nice chicken fricassee.!
« Last Edit: February 18, 2015, 11:50:25 AM by PetrifiedWood »

Half Axe

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2012, 08:24:14 PM »
Crispy Coated Walleye

walleye fillets
1 c. all purpose flour
1 T Old Bay Seasoning
1 egg
1/2 c. milk
2 c. potato flakes (crushed corn flakes can be substituted)

Mix the flour and seasoning in one bowl and the egg and milk in another.  Rinse the fillets and coat with the flour/seasoning, dip in the egg/milk, and coat with the potato flakes.  Put a half-inch of oil in a cast iron fry pan and get it hot.  Fry the fillets.  Eat and repeat.


Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Dutch Oven Roadkill Chicken
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2012, 09:44:54 AM »
Roadkill Chicken in the Dutch Oven

I call this Roadkill Chicken because it's flattened out with a method called Spatchcock.  To spatchcock a chicken, you use shears or a knife to cut on either side of the backbone and remove it.  Then you press down firmly on the inside of the chicken and flatten the breast against the cutting board.  You'll hear a very distinct cracking (like cracking your knuckles) as the bird takes it's new, albeit unflattering, shape.  Once you've flattened your bird, in a small bowl mix:

  • 1 large pinch of Thyme
  • 1 large pinch of Rosemary
  • 1 large pinch of Salt
  • 1 large pinch of Cracked Pepper
  • 1-2 cloves of Garlic, minced
  • a glob of soft Butter
  • a couple lugs of Olive Oil

Mix this up into a paste.  Add whatever herbs you have on hand, don't be stingy with em.  Peel up the skin of the bird and massage this paste between the skin and the meat, making sure you coat the meat nicely.  Really try and get that stuff into the nooks and crannies.  Any leftover herbs and oil can be smeared on the outside of the chicken.

Prepare a large dutch oven (12" is the smallest you can realistically use) on a bed of coals, and add a few Tbsp of oil.  When it's nice and hot, plop that bird skin-side-down into the DO and let it sear for 10-15 min.  (Don't move it!!)  After it's good and crispy, you can carefully flip it over.   NOTE: You want to make sure you don't leave skin on the bottom of the DO, so use a spatula or 2, and take your time!

Flip the bird and place it skin-side-up on a roasting rack or a few potatoes or chunked root veggies (radishes, carrots, potatoes, rutabagas, whatever......go crazy!).  You want it elevated and off the bottom of the DO (but not touching the cover) so it gets a nice crispy skin.  Place the cover on the DO and cover it completely with hot coals.  You'll want a DO temp of around 450o.  Check the bird after 45 minutes to see if how she's coming along.  You'll probably want to add some new coals at this point, for the final heating.

One more thing.  When the bird is done and resting (it will reabsorb the juices while it rests) and the veggies are plated, you might as well make some gravy to round out the meal.  Mix up a couple teaspoons of corn starch and add it to a 1/2 cup or so of cold water and whisk it around.  Slowly add this to the simmering juices in the Dutch Oven, stirring constantly.  Make sure to scrape all of the good tasty bits off the bottom of the DO.  When the gravy is nice and rich, pour it off into a gravy boat.

Dutch Oven cooking requires a bit of observation, coal-maintenance, and trial and error but it pays off.  Don't be afraid to experiment, it's the essence of cooking!
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2012, 11:07:17 AM »
This is a recipe I sort of came up with on my own. It's an amalgam of several gumbo recipes. "gumbo" is an African word, meaning "okra". But this recipe instead uses file' powder to thicken it at the table, rather than okra in the ingredients. Purists will insist that if it doesn't have okra, it isn't gumbo. However the French Creoles in the country north of New Orleans made gumbo without okra all the time.

Anyhow, here goes...

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

 
Ingredients
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup vegetable oil (or bacon grease)
1 bell pepper chopped
1 onion chopped
2 stalks celery chopped
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut into 1" pieces
1 lb. smoked sausage cut into 1/4" thick rounds
1 bay leaf
2 cloves garlic, minced
Water - 2 or more cups
Tony Chachere's creole seasoning
salt and pepper to taste
Gumbo file' powder
Cayenne pepper
long grain white rice

Start by chopping your "trinity" of onions, bell pepper and celery, then put them together in a bowl and set them aside, along with the minced garlic. Then in a big pot, brown the chicken and sausage well, and set aside.

In the same pot, add flour and oil and over medium-high heat, keep stirring until the flour turns chocolate brown. This is making a roux. You have to stir constantly or it will burn and you'll need to start over. Any black flecks of burnt flour will ruin the flavor.

As soon as the roux gets close to the chocolate brown color, add in the chopped vegetables. This will help prevent the roux from burning. Keep the vegetables moving in the pot just to be safe, for another 30 seconds to a minute. You want them to wilt and glaze a little. They will smell just awesome at this point.

After the veggies have wilted some, then you can add 2 cups of water, and then the chicken and sausage, and the bay leaf. Also add about 2 level teaspoons of the Tony Chachere's creole seasoning, and add about 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper. If you need more water, add just enough to barely cover the contents of the pot. You want them all to be wet, but not so much water as to thin out the soup too much. Let this simmer on medium-low heat for an hour. After an hour, taste it and add Tony's seasoning until the heat level is to your liking, then add salt until the salt level is to your liking. Before serving, skim off the excess oil from the surface. Oxo makes a great oil separator for the purpose that is a lot easier than trying to scoop it all up with a spoon. Remove and discard the bay leaf.

While the gumbo is simmering for an hour, you can start your rice so it will be ready when the gumbo is done.

To serve, use wide brimmed soup bowls and place a scoop of white rice in the center of the bowl, then ladle the gumbo around the outside. You can sprinkle about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of file powder onto the gumbo, and a little more on the brim of the bowl and the top of the rice for a garnish. Do the same with a tiny bit of cayenne pepper for color.

This is best served with some french bread garlic toast.

This same recipe can be modified by eliminating the sausage, and using a lot less water. The chicken breasts are increased from 2 to 4. Brown them as before and set aside. Make the roux in a deep skillet instead of a pot. When the roux is ready, add the veggies and then just enough water to keep from burning, then simmer covered over low heat for an hour until the chicken is fully cooked and tender. Taste and season as before. Serve this over rice and you'll have a nice chicken fricassee.!

  It sounds great,  I'd love to try it,  can you or anybody tell me of a substitute for the two ingredients that us northern folks can't usually find up here,  Tony Chacheres Creole Seasonings,  and Gumbo File powder.
  And while we can get Zatarans rice mixes,  we can't find their other seasonings and breading mixes.

  Thanks.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2012, 10:58:07 PM »
 Soup to me is comfort food this Black Bean soup  is one of my favorites. This a quick and easy soup to make in base camp or at home to really warm your soul on cold & rainy days
20 MIN BLACK BEAN SOUP

Ingredients

1 tbsp Olive Oil
1 cup Onion, Chopped
4 Garlic Clove
1 tsp Spices, Chili Powder
31 oz Black Beans (Drained & Rinsed)
15 oz Tomatoes, Petite Diced
2 cups Low Sodium Chicken Stock
1 tsp Salt
1/4 cup Cilantro
2 Fresh Jalepeno Pepper


Directions

In a large pan, heat olive oil over medium. Add onion, Jalapeno and garlic, and cook 6-8 minutes, until beginnning to brown. Stir in cumin and chili powder. Add black beans, diced tomatoes, chicken broth, salt and cilantro. Bring to a boil, and allow to cook for 2 minutes. Transfer 1 c to a blender, and process until smooth(if cooking in camp smash the beans with the back of a spoon in the pot). Stir back into soup. Remove from heat, and serve topped with crema, jack cheese & warm corn tortillas on the side.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2012, 10:59:52 PM by Smokewalker »
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline WoodsWoman

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Cheesy Ranch Hashbrowns
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2012, 10:59:36 PM »
Ingredients:

Cheesy Ranch Hashbrowns.


A good handful of  frozen southern style hash brown potatoes, defrosted.
A hefty squirt of Ranch dressing.
 1/8 th cup milk.
 As much shreded cheddar cheese as you like.
If you have some sour cream throw a bit in.

 Heavy duty tin foil 

Instructions

Mix all ingredients then drugstore wrap in foil two times,put in campfire,20 minutes or so,until tender.

***  I wonder if one could put a slice of spam on the bottom along with this idea? ***

WW.
 

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2012, 11:47:27 PM »
I've been baking sourdough bread every week  for the last 5 years and I have tried as many different starters. In the last 2 months I grew a new starter it is the best and easiest  and most economical to maintain out of any to date. It takes 10 days to mature until you can bake your first loaf. You will need a kitchen scale and a gallon of spring water and all purpose flour along with your mason jar.
 On Day one
measure 1 oz of flour and 1 oz of water into your jar stir to combine and place it some where that is about 70-75? stir it a few times a day
Day Two
Don't feed just stir you should see a few bubbles
Day Three
Feed I oz each water & flour and stir a few times
Day Four
Bubbling should be more active feed & stir
Day Five
it should start to smell like beer and be more active feed & stir 1 oz of flour and water
Day Six
Bubbles should be visible on the sides of the jar and it will start to have the sour smell feed & stir
Day Seven
it should be very active and bubbles should come to the surface  when stirred Feed and stir as before
 Day Eight
 Feed and stir
Day Nine
Feed and stir
Day Ten
Feed and stir in the morning around dinner time weigh out 4 oz of starter into a clean container with a lid feed this with 2oz flour and 1 oz water stir it up and put the lid on loosely Tomorrow You bake!

Day 11
Feed the starter to begin to replenish it ( I just keep it on the counter in the kitchen all the time)

This is Smokewalkers Sourdough Bread

I use a Kitchen-aide mixer so if you don't adjust accordingly
Measure into the bowl 1 1/2 ups flour and 1 tbl sugar stir them together
now add the starter that you removed last night and add it on top of the flour
measure another 1 1/2 cups flour and put it on top of the starter
Measure out 1 cup of milk and 1 tbl shortening warm in the microwave for 45 sec
pour the milk / shortening onto the flour put on the dough hook and mix until the dough pulls away from the bowl then starts sticking to the bowl again, Turn the mixer off and walk away or 20 min
measure out 1 tsp of salt before restarting the mixer sprinkle the salt onto the dough
restart the mixer add flour 1-2 tbl at a time until the dough no longer grabs the bottom of the bowl continue to knead for 5 min
 Prepare your loaf pan  with a lite coating of shortening then sprinkle with corn meal
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board and press it out flat into a rectangle about 10" long and 8 " wide. Fold the dough in thirds on the long side place seam side down in the prepared loaf pan cores with plastic wrap sprayed with Pam
It will take about 4-6 hrs to raise when it is about 1" above the pan preheat the oven to 400? bake on the center rack for 25-30 min.
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline Old Philosopher

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Amish Friendship Bread
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2012, 12:30:20 AM »
AMISH FRIENDSHIP BREAD STARTER

1 pkg. active dry yeast
3 c. sugar
3 c. flour
3 c. milk
On Day 1: Soften yeast mixture in 1/4 cup of lukewarm water. Set aside for 5 minutes, then stir well to be sure it has dissolved.
In a glass or plastic bowl, combine 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk. Stir in yeast mixture using a wooden or plastic spoon (don't use metal spoon or electric mixer). Cover bowl loosely with paper towel, cloth, wax paper or plastic wrap. Keep at room temperature (don't refrigerate).
On Days 2, 3 and 4: Using wooden or plastic spoon, stir mixture once each day.
On Day 5: Add 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk; stir.
On Days 6, 7, 8 and 9: Using wooden or plastic spoon, stir mixture once each day.
On Day 10: Add 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk.
Remove 3 cups of mixture and give 1 cup each to three friends. Save remaining starter for yourself.

[Alternative:
Set aside 1 cu starter for your bread recipe.
Retain the other 2 cu of starter. You can place this in the refrigerator in a covered container for later use.
When you decide to bake again, remove another 1 cu of starter for the standard recipe.
To the remaining cup, add 1/2 cu flour, 1/2 cu sugar and 1/2 cu milk.
Stir this daily for 3-4 days.
Add another 1/2 cu each of flour, sugar and milk.
Stir for another 3-4 days.
You can now start the process again with the 3 cu of starter you have, or you can refrigerate the whole batch for up to a month.]


AMISH FRIENDSHIP BREAD (makes two 9"x5" loaves):

1 c. Amish friendship bread starter
2/3 c. oil
1 c. milk
3 eggs
2 c. flour
1 ?  tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 large box of vanilla pudding (not instant)
1 c. chopped nuts or raisins (optional)
2  tsp. cinnamon
1 c. sugar
In mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Bake in 2 well greased and floured or sugared 9"x5" bread pans. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the loaf comes out clean.
NOTE: Raisins, chopped apples, drained, crushed pineapple, candied fruit, coconut, mashed banana, dates, chopped nuts and/or chocolate chips (1/2 cup each) may be added to batter before baking.
You can also substitute other flavors of pudding for a change of pace.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 12:32:28 AM by Old Philosopher »
The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2012, 09:41:51 AM »
This Sourdough recipe is a Texas original that I got from a ranch cook out around Bandera years ago and makes some tasty bread.

Texas Sweet Sourdough Bread
INGREDIENTS:

For the starter
1 package dry yeast
5 1/2 cups warm water
1/3 cup sugar
3 tablespoons potato flakes (must be flakes)


To Use
1 cup starter
1 1/2 cup warm water
1/2 cup oil
1 1/2 tablespoon salt
1/3 cup sugar
9 cups  bread flour


PREPARATION:

Make the starter

Mix ingredients and place in a large glass jar set in a nice sunny or warm place for at least 4 hours. Mixture will become foamy and you will hear hissing from the lid of the jar. Pour off 1 cup of the mixture. At this point you can put this in another glass jar and refrigerate both jars or you can make some bread:

To use:

Mix together to form stiff dough and knead with hands until smooth and elastic. Place in a bowl oil the top and cover with plastic wrap. This can sit overnight in a warm place. Next day punch down fashion two loaves and place in greased/floured bread pans. Bake at 400/425 degrees for about 35 minutes.

Every time you want to make bread take the glass jar from the fridge and Feed starter again: 1 cup warm water, 1/3 cup sugar, 3 Tbsp potato flakes.
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2012, 11:53:00 AM »
  Quick Trail Soup

   * one cup of Orida Potato Buds
   * 1/2 cup of dry milk flakes
   * one tablespoon of granulated instant beef or chicken bouilion
   * one tablespoon of dried parsley
   * pinch of dried thyme
   * one teaspoon of dried onion bits
   Mix the above ingredients and store in zip lock bag.

   In camp,  get four cups of water boiling,  add the pre-packaged dry soup mix.
   Bring it back to a boil,  move it off the direct heat and simmer for a minute or two while stiring.
   Salt & pepper to taste.   

   Makes four servings.

  * For a heartyier soup,  boil two medium potatoes in the four cups of water (slightly salted)  either sliced or diced until fork tender,  then add the dried soup mix as per directions above.
   
 
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Egg in a Potato
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2012, 09:42:20 PM »
Egg in a Potato

1 Med. Baking potato
1 Egg
Butter

Butter the outside of the potato, wrap in tin foil , and bake in the hot coals until done.  Remove from heat. Slice open the potato, but dont cut all the way through.  Open it up slightly, place a pat of butter inside.  Break an egg into the potato and return it to the coals , egg side up.  Bake until the egg is set.  Season with salt and pepper. 

From :  Camp Ground Cookery

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Spam Strudel
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2012, 05:10:05 PM »
Say what? But the more I read this, the better it sounds. Any spiced meat should work.

SPAM VEGETABLE STRUDEL
 
 Recipe By     :
 Serving Size  : 6    Preparation Time :0:00
 Categories    : Main dish
 
   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
 --------  ------------  --------------------------------
    1       pk           Long-grain and wild rice
                         -mix (6.25 oz)
      1/2   c            Chopped carrot
      1/2   c            Chopped red bell pepper
      1/4   c            Orange juice
    1       cn           SPAM Luncheon Meat, cut in
                         -thin strips (12 oz)
    2       c            Chopped mushrooms
      1/4   c            Sliced green onions
    1       tb           Dijon-style mustard
      1/2   ts           Basil
      1/4   ts           Pepper
    6                    Sheets frozen phyllo pastry,
                         -thawed
                         Butter-flavor vegetable
                         -cooking spray
    1       tb           Dry bread crumbs
                         Soy sauce
 
   Heat oven to 375'F. Prepare rice according to package directions. In
   small saucepan, combine carrots, red pepper, and orange juice. Bring
   to a boil. Cover and cook 5-7 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain
   well. Place in medium bowl. In large skillet, saute SPAM, mushrooms,
   and green onion until tender. Add SPAM mixture, rice, mustard, basil,
   and pepper to vegetable mixture; stir well. Place 1 sheet phyllo
   pastry on a damp towel (keep remaining phyllo covered). Lightly coat
   phyllo with cooking spray. Layer remaining 5 sheets phyllo pastry on
   first sheet, lightly coating each sheet with cooking spray. Spoon
   SPAM mixture lengthwise down center of phyllo stack, leaving a 1/2?
   border. Roll phyllo jelly-roll style, starting with long side
   containing SPAM mixture. Tuck ends under; place diagonally, seam side
   down, on baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Lightly coat top of
   pastry with cooking spray and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Make 12
   (1/4? deep) diagonal slits across top of pastry using a sharp knife.
   Bake 20 minutes or until golden. Serve with soy sauce.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Spam Strudel
« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2012, 07:46:57 AM »
Say what? But the more I read this, the better it sounds. Any spiced meat should work.

SPAM VEGETABLE STRUDEL
 
 Recipe By     :
 Serving Size  : 6    Preparation Time :0:00
 Categories    : Main dish
 
   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
 --------  ------------  --------------------------------
    1       pk           Long-grain and wild rice
                         -mix (6.25 oz)
      1/2   c            Chopped carrot
      1/2   c            Chopped red bell pepper
      1/4   c            Orange juice
    1       cn           SPAM Luncheon Meat, cut in
                         -thin strips (12 oz)
    2       c            Chopped mushrooms
      1/4   c            Sliced green onions
    1       tb           Dijon-style mustard
      1/2   ts           Basil
      1/4   ts           Pepper
    6                    Sheets frozen phyllo pastry,
                         -thawed
                         Butter-flavor vegetable
                         -cooking spray
    1       tb           Dry bread crumbs
                         Soy sauce
 
   Heat oven to 375'F. Prepare rice according to package directions. In
   small saucepan, combine carrots, red pepper, and orange juice. Bring
   to a boil. Cover and cook 5-7 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain
   well. Place in medium bowl. In large skillet, saute SPAM, mushrooms,
   and green onion until tender. Add SPAM mixture, rice, mustard, basil,
   and pepper to vegetable mixture; stir well. Place 1 sheet phyllo
   pastry on a damp towel (keep remaining phyllo covered). Lightly coat
   phyllo with cooking spray. Layer remaining 5 sheets phyllo pastry on
   first sheet, lightly coating each sheet with cooking spray. Spoon
   SPAM mixture lengthwise down center of phyllo stack, leaving a 1/2?
   border. Roll phyllo jelly-roll style, starting with long side
   containing SPAM mixture. Tuck ends under; place diagonally, seam side
   down, on baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Lightly coat top of
   pastry with cooking spray and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Make 12
   (1/4? deep) diagonal slits across top of pastry using a sharp knife.
   Bake 20 minutes or until golden. Serve with soy sauce.

    Thanks OP,  My first thought was that in my little world Strudel has always been viewed as a sweet desert,  while the above sounds interesting,  it would take some getting used to on my part.

    But on second thought it doesn't sound too much different than the roll ups that I've made for party snacks using veggies and spicy Italian deli meats wrapped in rolled puff pastry dough,  baked and then sliced into rounds.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Smokewalker's Tortilla recipe
« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2012, 08:21:41 PM »
Tortilla's

Aint nothing better than a fresh cooked Tortilla fresh off the comal, with a little butter and a sprinkle of salt. I prefer maize for everything cept for burritos.
 Rog if you want to make your own this recipe makes a good one.

 Awesome Tortillas

1 cup (4 1/2 ounces) bread flour
1 cup (4 ounces) masa harina
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt12 teaspoons baking powder
1 tablespoon olive oil
2/3 cup water
Procedures

1. Put the flour, masa harina, sugar, salt, and baking powder in your food processor fitted with the proper blade for working dough. Pulse a few times to distribute the ingredients. Add the oil, turn the processor on, and with it running, add the water through the feed tube as fast as the flour will absorb it. It should form a ball - if it doesn't, add tiny bit more water to get it to form that cohesive ball.
2. Continue processing for another minute. The dough will feel gritty from the masa harina, but it should also feel like a cohesive dough. Put the dough in a plastic bag or in a small bowl covered with plastic wrap. Set aside to rest for 20 min. It

3. Preheat a cast iron frying pan, griddle, or other heavy pan on the stovetop.

4. Flour your work surface and turn out the dough. Divide it into 8 even pieces. Form each piece into a ball, then flatten the first ball into a disk. Roll it with a rolling pin to circle about 6-8 inches in diameter.

5. Place the circle in the preheated pan and cook until you see large bubbles forming and the bottom has browned spots - about a minute. Flip it over and cook another 30 seconds.

6. Remove the tortilla and cover it with a clean kitchen towel. Continue rolling and cooking the tortillas, stacking them up and covering them as you go. Serve them warm. You can also reheat them briefly on a hot pan
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Offline Dano

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2012, 08:43:52 PM »
Meatloaf....everyon e has their own, but this one is pretty tasty!  (Got it from my New Mother in Law)

1 1/2 pounds of lean ground beef (chuck if you got it)
1 cup tomato juice
1 egg, beaten
1 package of dry onion soup mix
3/4 to 1 cup Quaker Oats, uncooked

Preheat oven to 350

Add all ingredients except the ground beef and mix thoroughly.  Let sit for about 5 minutes to allow the oats to absorb some of the goodness.
Add  ground beef and mix lightly, but thoroughly...best if done by hand!
Press into a loaf pan (we have one of those stoneware kind) and level it off well.  Ours is 8" x 4"  and it gets pretty close to the top.
Bake for 1 hour.
Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing.
Dive in!

(If you prefer it to be more moist use 3/4 cup of oats, if you like it a little drier use a full cup.  Also, the fat content of your ground beef plays into it too.  You may have to try this a couple times to get it the way you want it.)

IF you have any leftovers, they make the best meatloaf sandwich I've ever had!  But we usually eat it all, so if you want sandwiches the next day, double the recipe!
« Last Edit: March 27, 2012, 08:47:34 PM by Dano »

Offline Old Philosopher

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Steak Sauce
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2012, 08:22:17 PM »
Steak Sauce
1/2 cu water
1/3 cu raisins
2 Tbs ketchup
1 Tbs Worcestershire Sauce
2 Tbs Dijon mustard
2 Tbs wine vinegar
1/2 tsp onion powder
In a small bowl, pour boiling water over raisins and allow them to sit until they've plumped up.
Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until the raisins are thoroughly pureed.
Keep unused portion refrigerated.
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Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #21 on: April 05, 2012, 07:28:36 PM »
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #22 on: April 06, 2012, 06:43:15 PM »
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  Sounds great,  one question,  are you mixing one cup of the tea with the sugar and baking soda,  or an additional third cup of water ?
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Offline Quinn

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #23 on: April 07, 2012, 02:13:51 PM »
Quinn's quick bread
(Irrrisshh brown bread)

1 Cup all purpose flour
2 Cups whole wheat flour
2 Tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 Tablespoon butter
1/4 Cup rolled oats  (regular or quick)
1 1/2 Cup plain or vanilla yogurt
milk

In large bowl, mix all-purpose flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder & salt.
Cut in butter until mix forms fine crumbs.
Stir in whole wheat flour and oats.
Add yogurt, stir gently. If too dry stir in milk slowly, about a Tablespoon at a time, until dough just holds together & is not 'sticky'.

Turn dough onto floured board & knead gently about 5 times to make a ball.
Set on lightly greased baking sheet.
Gently pat ball into about a 7 inch circle and with floured knife cut a large X in top of loaf.  Put a pat of butter into this X cut.
Bake at 375 degree oven  until browned, about 40 minutes.
Cool on rack.

Real easy and good with a hearty home-made soup.
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Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #24 on: April 07, 2012, 03:33:47 PM »
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  Sounds great,  one question,  are you mixing one cup of the tea with the sugar and baking soda,  or an additional third cup of water ?
3 cups water total
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #25 on: April 07, 2012, 08:24:45 PM »
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  Sounds great,  one question,  are you mixing one cup of the tea with the sugar and baking soda,  or an additional third cup of water ?
3 cups water total


      Thanks,  that's a must try.
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Offline jontok

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2012, 05:21:00 PM »
Here goes... Pancakes my way...
(Our pancakes are thinner than yours btw.)
This is roughly how I make it.

Mix 4 eggs with about 1/2 cup sugar. Whisk for a bit.
Add about 1 Liter of milk
Stir in some flour until the batter is the consistency of a thick sauce.
Whisk until there are no more lumps.
Add about 1/2 cup of melted butter.
Continue whisking/stirring until everything is nice and lump free.

Put a little butter in a hot frying pan. add some batter and swirl it around so it covers the bottom of the frying pan ( you may want to experiment some here, to get the thickness you like. Should be something like a thin tortilla).
Flip the pancake.
fry until golden on other side. Serve.

These are good with sugar, jam (especially blueberry) or bacon.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #27 on: April 09, 2012, 06:32:56 PM »
Here goes... Pancakes my way...
(Our pancakes are thinner than yours btw.)
This is roughly how I make it.

Mix 4 eggs with about 1/2 cup sugar. Whisk for a bit.
Add about 1 Liter of milk
Stir in some flour until the batter is the consistency of a thick sauce.
Whisk until there are no more lumps.
Add about 1/2 cup of melted butter.
Continue whisking/stirring until everything is nice and lump free.

Put a little butter in a hot frying pan. add some batter and swirl it around so it covers the bottom of the frying pan ( you may want to experiment some here, to get the thickness you like. Should be something like a thin tortilla).
Flip the pancake.
fry until golden on other side. Serve.

These are good with sugar, jam (especially blueberry) or bacon.

  In a Canuck's kitchen those are called Crepes,  our Pancakes are made with well beaten eggs, a little melted butter,  baking soda,  salt,  milk,  and enough sifted flour to make a semi-thick 'batter',  all the ingredients are added to a bowl and gently folded only enough to insure that everything is wet,  leaving the lumps intact.
  The batter is left to meld for about ten or fifteen minutes while the cast iron grill heats up to medium,  just before spooning the batter onto the grill in three inch rounds,  crushed up crispy bacon bits and the bacon drippings are folded into the batter,  when they are done they will be a light golden color and just under a half inch thick,  the only way a self respecting frenchman would serve them is either slathered with butter and sprinkled with sugar,  or with dark amber maple syrup.

  On the trail,  a couple of eggs,  pinch of salt,  Bisquick baking mix,  and the bacon and drippings are mixed with powdered milk and water,  and served as above.

  In a pinch,  Bisquick powdered pancake mix,  add water,  give it a shake and bake on a hot rock.   :fire2:  :banana:
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Offline jontok

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #28 on: April 10, 2012, 03:09:00 PM »
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #29 on: April 10, 2012, 09:37:30 PM »
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D

  ROTFLMAO,  now that's funny.

  But on a serious note,  have you tried real pancakes,  you know,  good old American flap jacks ?

  Your recipe is actually within a hairs breath of being a Crepe recipe,  doing it that way would result in a very thin, very dense,  and very sweet pastry round.
  The reason we use baking powder and sift the flour is to insure that our pancakes turn out light and fluffy and have some levening rise,  and the reason that we only stir the batter enough to wet the mix instead of beating it into a paste is because over working the flour breaks down the gluten and makes the pancakes rubbery and dense,  the lumps are broken down by the cooking process.
  Here we like thick, light, and fluffy pancakes,  and I like mine best when they are grilled so the the top and bottom have a light crusty texture.
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Offline jontok

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2012, 02:35:21 PM »
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D

  ROTFLMAO,  now that's funny.

  But on a serious note,  have you tried real pancakes,  you know,  good old American flap jacks ?

  Your recipe is actually within a hairs breath of being a Crepe recipe,  doing it that way would result in a very thin, very dense,  and very sweet pastry round.
  The reason we use baking powder and sift the flour is to insure that our pancakes turn out light and fluffy and have some levening rise,  and the reason that we only stir the batter enough to wet the mix instead of beating it into a paste is because over working the flour breaks down the gluten and makes the pancakes rubbery and dense,  the lumps are broken down by the cooking process.
  Here we like thick, light, and fluffy pancakes,  and I like mine best when they are grilled so the the top and bottom have a light crusty texture.
You guys are still weird...  8)

I have actually tried Bisquick! :D
A guy I know in Texas sendt me a box a couple of years ago. Was interesting....

Ok, mustn't clutter up this thread with more chatter... On with the recipies! :)
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2012, 04:51:40 PM »
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D

  ROTFLMAO,  now that's funny.

  But on a serious note,  have you tried real pancakes,  you know,  good old American flap jacks ?

  Your recipe is actually within a hairs breath of being a Crepe recipe,  doing it that way would result in a very thin, very dense,  and very sweet pastry round.
  The reason we use baking powder and sift the flour is to insure that our pancakes turn out light and fluffy and have some levening rise,  and the reason that we only stir the batter enough to wet the mix instead of beating it into a paste is because over working the flour breaks down the gluten and makes the pancakes rubbery and dense,  the lumps are broken down by the cooking process.
  Here we like thick, light, and fluffy pancakes,  and I like mine best when they are grilled so the the top and bottom have a light crusty texture.
You guys are still weird...  8)

I have actually tried Bisquick! :D
A guy I know in Texas sendt me a box a couple of years ago. Was interesting....

Ok, mustn't clutter up this thread with more chatter... On with the recipies! :)

Ah,  Bisquick,  wonderful stuff.
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Offline zammer

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #32 on: April 13, 2012, 09:55:22 PM »
Bean Soup and Tortellini...

1 cup 9 Bean-mix soaked over night
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 onion coarsely chopped
2 clove's of garlic chopped up small
4 cups chicken stock or broth
1 28oz can of either whole or diced tomato's
salt and pepper to taste
1 small bag of Tortellini

Saute celery/onions/ & garlic...approx 5-10 min


add pre-soaked beans...and stir


add 4 cups chicken stock...


add 28 oz can tomato's...in this case I used Roma's...put on lid and let simmer for 2 hrs, stir occasionally and break-up tomatoes...


after approx 2 hrs you can either eat or add some Tortellini and cook another 30 min...


When Tortellini is cooked, plate it up and enjoy...I didn't have any, but this recipe tastes really great if you add some freshly grated Parmesan on top just before serving.


One batch of this cost $4.95 ( without the Tortellini ) and $9.20 with the Tortellini and made 5 very healthy servings, 2 of which were eaten immediately...Mmmm mmm good, and 3 were popped in the freezer for later.

If you try this recipe or have one of your own, let us know...
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Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2012, 10:00:15 PM »
I would hurt a bowl or three of that but I cant get tortellini around here.
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline zammer

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #34 on: April 14, 2012, 08:21:19 AM »
I would hurt a bowl or three of that but I cant get tortellini around here.

I started off with the intention of just a bean soup but the Tortellini kept calling out to me, so I did what any self respecting ( starving cook ) would do, and threw them in the wok. I suppose any pasta could be added to help with the heartiness of it.
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Offline Dano

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2012, 04:58:45 AM »
I would hurt a bowl or three of that but I cant get tortellini around here.

I started off with the intention of just a bean soup but the Tortellini kept calling out to me, so I did what any self respecting ( starving cook ) would do, and threw them in the wok. I suppose any pasta could be added to help with the heartiness of it.

I'm pretty sure we could do some major damage to a pot of that....MAN that looks great!!

Offline werewolf won

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2012, 07:15:09 AM »
The New England Clam Boil
1 to 1-1/2 pounds soft shell (steamer) clams
1 pound Maine lobster
2 potatoes (Maine "white" or "New" aka "Red potato")
1 sweet Potato (or Yam)
1 or 2 ears corn
2 or 3 breakfast style sausages
2 hot dogs
6 inch length of spicy smoked style sausage
1 yellow onion
1/2 pound Cod fish

Multiply above portion by number of people.

Soak the clams in salted water for a half hour.

Wrap Cod in buttered parchment paper or brown paper

Put all into a deep pan, fill about one quarter deep with fresh water and bring to boil covered. Cook half hour to forty minutes or till potatoes are cooked.

Serve with small bowls of melted butter and cooking liquid.

The famous argument is always do the clams go on top of the vegetables and meats to steam or on the bottom to boil.   I've had both, I don't see the difference; but two  old Yankees might fight to the death over the right way :D.

The variation of this is the clam bake where the food is placed over red hot rocks that are covered in a thick layer of rock weed (seaweed); the food is also covered in weed, and the whole thing is covered in a canvas tarp and allowed to smoke and steam until cooked.  The finished product is strongly flavored with smoked seaweed.

Wolf



« Last Edit: April 16, 2012, 07:17:17 AM by werewolf won »
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #37 on: April 17, 2012, 07:44:18 AM »
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  I finely got around to making your sweet tea yesterday,  being an iced tea lover,  I thought it was great,  though I took the liberty of adding a lemon slice to the glass.
  The next time I make it i'm going to try adding a sliced up lemon to the simple sugar mixture while it's simmering and see what happens.
  I have to admit that I was surprised that the tea wasn't as week as I expected it to be when topped off in the gallon jug,  I think it sure beats the processed instant iced tea mixes,  thanks for the recipe.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #38 on: April 17, 2012, 08:03:06 AM »
The New England Clam Boil
1 to 1-1/2 pounds soft shell (steamer) clams
1 pound Maine lobster
2 potatoes (Maine "white" or "New" aka "Red potato")
1 sweet Potato (or Yam)
1 or 2 ears corn
2 or 3 breakfast style sausages
2 hot dogs
6 inch length of spicy smoked style sausage
1 yellow onion
1/2 pound Cod fish

Multiply above portion by number of people.

Soak the clams in salted water for a half hour.

Wrap Cod in buttered parchment paper or brown paper

Put all into a deep pan, fill about one quarter deep with fresh water and bring to boil covered. Cook half hour to forty minutes or till potatoes are cooked.

Serve with small bowls of melted butter and cooking liquid.

The famous argument is always do the clams go on top of the vegetables and meats to steam or on the bottom to boil.   I've had both, I don't see the difference; but two  old Yankees might fight to the death over the right way :D.

The variation of this is the clam bake where the food is placed over red hot rocks that are covered in a thick layer of rock weed (seaweed); the food is also covered in weed, and the whole thing is covered in a canvas tarp and allowed to smoke and steam until cooked.  The finished product is strongly flavored with smoked seaweed.

Wolf

  Nothing finer than a good old fashioned down east clam bake,  hard to beat those that I've had at that farm in Rehobeth,  the best I ever had was at a small roadside place in Bar Harbor Maine,  they put the steamers, corn, lobster, sausage, and potatoes in a mesh bag,  tied off the end,  and dumped it in a concrete cauldron of boiling sea water and cooked it for just under twenty minutes,  everything was done just to perfection,  even the clam necks were tender,  and the salt in the sea water seasoned everything just right.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #39 on: April 17, 2012, 08:28:06 AM »
One of family favorites. You can add regular( non high temp) cheese, or nuts, whatever to the mix, or just make it plain. It's good stuff & quick. I also make cup-like crusts in a muffin tin/pan & fill with chili or stew, & then make lil caps for tops to make mini "pot-pies". If you take & roll it out flat & add ham & cheese & roll it up, you have a ham & cheese bread roll. You can do the same with taco meat & fixins/sauce & it is like a huge enchilada type bread roll.. All sorts of uses. I even use this to make biscuits, by placing dollops on a greased cookie sheet & cutting the baking time in half. {or so..check biscuits with a toothpick after 20 minutes. Insert toothpick & if it comes out clean & cleanly, your baking is done..}
 Great for Biscuits & Country Gravy for breakfast..
 ;)


Mouth watering, yet? Mine is... So here's a recipe for Beer Bread:


Ingredients:


3 cups flour (sifted)

3 teaspoons baking powder (omit if using Self-Rising Flour)

1 teaspoon salt (omit if using Self-Rising Flour)

1/4 cup sugar

1 (12 ounce) can beer

1/2 cup melted butter (1/4 cup will do just fine)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Mix dry ingredients and beer.   Pour into a greased loaf pan  Pour the melted butter over mixture.  Bake 1 hour, remove from pan and cool for at least 15 minutes. Some tips: This recipe makes a very hearty bread with a crunchy, buttery crust. If you prefer a softer crust (like a traditional bread) mix the butter into the batter instead of pouring it over the top.Sifting flour for bread recipes is a must-do. Most people just scoop the 1 cup measure in the flour canister and level it off. That compacts the flour and will turn your bread into a "hard biscuit" as some have described. That's because they aren't sifting their flour! If you do not have a sifter, use a spoon to spoon the flour into the 1 cup measure. Try it once the "correct" way and you will see an amazing difference in the end product.

You can also use Non alcoholic beverages & even stale 7-up or sprite. I have done it & it worked well.

{But you may want to add a bit of yeast.. a packet of Dry Active Yeast or 2 teaspoons of Bread (Machine) Yeast so that you get a proper rise. I've not used yeast myself, but it should work just fine.}


Now I suppose a "Country Gravy recipe should show up here soon, eh?
 ;)

I hope you enjoy this, & have fun with it we do!
 :D

Edit note: I have used this same recipe at home for years, but I copied & pasted one here that is just like it to save time in typing. I also added the yeast tip which I have not tried.
 :)
« Last Edit: April 17, 2012, 08:34:55 AM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #40 on: April 17, 2012, 09:16:30 AM »
  More from Southern New England kitchens.
       
                                         Dynamites
                                         _________

       * 2- pounds of ground chuck.
       * 5- large green bell peppers.
       * 4- large yellow or white onions.
       * 2- links of sweet Italian sausage.
       * 1- 28oz. can of diced tomatoes.
       * 1-  small can of tomato paste.
       * 1- tbsp. of minced garlic.
       * 1- tbsp. of Italian seasoning.
       * 1- tsp. red pepper flakes.
       * 2- tbsp. wostershire sauce.
       * Salt & Pepper to taste.
       * 12- sub rolls.
       
    * Cut the bell peppers in half lengthways,  then slice them crossways to 1/4" slices.
    * Peel the onions and slice them the same as the peppers.
    * In a large stock pot add a couple of tbsp. of butter and turn the stove to mediom heat to melt the butter,  then add the sliced peppers and onions in layers,  they should about fill the pot,  add a pinch of salt and pepper and start to sweat the veggies.
    * Once they start to sweat and shed some of their liquid,  add the can of diced tomatoes and tomato paste,  the Italian seasonings,  and the red pepper flakes, and continue to cook down the peppers and onions.
    * In a separate pan,
sautee the ground chuck seasoned with salt and pepper until cooked through and broken up into small bits (riced),  set aside.
    * When the peppers and onions are starting to get tender add the meat and the worcestershire sauce and the sliced sausage,  cover,  turn down the heat to a slow simmer and finish cooking until the peppers and onions are cooked but a little eldente.

   You will end up with a dish that resembles a loose sloppy joe's type mixture.

  Now,  slice the sub rolls lengthways across the top (not the sides) and using a slotted spoon, ladel the mix into the sub rolls,  serve with potato chips,  cold beer,  and plenty of paper towels.
  Have salt, pepper, and hot sauce available for those who need to adjust for individual tastes.

  You really have to try this to appreciate this treat,  it has become a staple meal and pure comfort food for folks along the southern MA./northern RI. border for most of the last century,  and with good cause.

  The above recipe will make 24 subs,  I freeze the left overs when I have some,  but that rarwly happens,  I usually make this on weekends when the kids gather to vist,  I usually buy four packages of sub rolls (24),  and there's not much left when they leave.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline zammer

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #41 on: April 17, 2012, 10:52:21 AM »
Some tasty soundin recipes here folks, thanks for all the contributions. 8)
"big fish like to live in bad places, that's how they get to be big fish"

Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #42 on: April 17, 2012, 10:49:42 PM »
DOROTHY BELDIN'S FISH BATTER RECIPE


Dean Beldin was an old catfisherman that I used to work with and I helped him run his throw lines when he needed the help.  He ate big hunks of cold flathead and channel cat out of his old battered and bent black lunchbox EVERY day for lunch break.  I asked him if he ever got tired of catfish for lunch every day.   Being a man of few words, he just reached down into his lunchbox and handed me a wax paper wrapped piece that his wife Dorothy fried up that morning before he left for work.  It was then that I learned why he never tired of his everyday fare.   This stuff is THE BEST!

2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter

Dry the fish
Mix enough water into the combined dry ingredients to make a heavy paste
Dip fish pieces in paste and shake off excess
Place in 365-375 degree deep fat and fry until pieces float and they are golden brown
Remove fry basket from fryer and drain for a moment, then dump out onto an issue of the daily newspaper with an opened brown paper grocery bag on top. 

Simple, but once you try it I'm sure you'll understand why ol' Dean ate the same thing every day, as long as I knew him :)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #43 on: April 18, 2012, 05:39:17 AM »
 Throw in some french fries,  cold beer,  and a little malt vinagar and I'll be there Wolfy.  :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline werewolf won

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #44 on: April 18, 2012, 08:29:45 AM »
Another New England Favorite

Johnny Cakes

Ingredients:

1 cup white cornmeal
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup water
1/2 cup milk
Grease for pan  (Bacon drippings are great)

Preparation:

1. Mix cornmeal and salt.

2. Bring water to a rapid boil; remove from heat.

3. Add boiling waterto the cornmeal while stirring constantly. 

4. Add milk.

5.  Heat and grease a fry pan and add batter in good sized spoonfulls.  Flatten the batter to a thickness of approximately 1/4 inch. Fry until golden brown, turn, and brown on the other side.

Serve hot with butter, maple syrup,  applesauce or other fruit jellies etc.

Enjoy

Wolf

I'll be a story in your head, but that's OK we're all stories in the end.  Just make it a good one!

Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #45 on: April 18, 2012, 10:10:05 AM »
One of the things that I have always enjoyed is a piece of  rich moist chocolate cake. The best I ever ate is an old recipe That goes by a few different monikers, some call it Wacky cake, Depression Cake, I just call it the best Chocolate cake I ever ate. Growing up my Granny would make this for us kids. Anyway heres the recipe.

Wacky Cake
3 c. flour
1/2 c. cocoa
1 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. vinegar
2 c cold black coffee
2 c. white sugar
2 tsp. soda
2/3 c. salad oil (Crisco)
2 tsp. vanilla

Mix all ingredients until well blended. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes.

Easy Icing

Ingredients

    3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips
    3 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon light corn syrup
    1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

    In a double boiler over hot, but not boiling water, combine chocolate chips, butter, and corn syrup. Stir until chips are melted and mixture is smooth, then add vanilla. Pour over cooled cake.

* I make this in a 1 qrt measure cup in the Micro wave in 30 sec intervals stirring in between until it is smooth
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #46 on: April 18, 2012, 03:38:44 PM »
We make almost the exact same cake, Smoke......I'm thoroughly convinced it's the coffee (the stronger, the better) that makes it as good as it is.  Must intensify the cocoa or something :-\
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #47 on: April 18, 2012, 11:42:27 PM »
I'm not very experienced at baking. But that recipe seems simple and easy to try. But, doesn't it need an egg?

Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #48 on: April 19, 2012, 08:00:54 AM »
Nope, no eggs!
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #49 on: April 19, 2012, 09:45:20 AM »
Nope, no eggs!

  Now I know I have to try this.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.