Author Topic: Folding Lockbacks  (Read 1726 times)

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Offline crashdive123

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Folding Lockbacks
« on: July 24, 2021, 02:23:44 PM »
I pulled a few out today to clean and oil.  The one on the left is a Buck 110.  I believe it was sort of a right of passage in the Navy in the 70's to own and wear one.  I picked this one up either in Hawaii or Guam.  The next two are Schrades - don't remember where or when I picked those up.  The fourth is a Ranger - got that in a trade for some camping gear long, long ago.  The last is a Coleman Western.  Picked that up on base (Bangor, Washington) in the early 80's when I was doing a lot of backpacking.  The synthetic handle cut down on the weight considerably.  Both the Buck and the Coleman have lost (worn out) their original cases.

It's sometimes fun to pull out things that you haven't used in a while (like Moe did) and remember the good times around them.




Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2021, 04:10:51 PM »
One of my first folders, after a few Boy Scout knives, was a Buck 110 like yours.  I gutted and skinned a few deer and antelope, and used it for cooking in camp.  Lost it somewhere along the line.

I have a Buck 110 now that has synthetic handles and weighs about 1/2 of the original.  Missed the original so I bought another a few years ago.  Both of them are good knives and probably my favorite folder when I am hunting deer. 
« Last Edit: July 24, 2021, 06:37:37 PM by wsdstan »
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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2021, 04:55:00 PM »
Nice collection crash!  My first "real mans" knife was a Buck 110 when I was 13.  Still have it.  I inherited my wifes grandfathers Buck 110 from the 60's.  He used it while serving in the Coast Guard and then the rest of his life as his main user until he passed in his early 70's.  And when I say inherited I mean I stopped it from going to the garage sale when we got the call from her grandmother to come have a look before the garage sale opens  :-\  He'd be much happier knowing it will stay in the family and know his grandson he never got to meet will have it...heirlooms like this are the best to me because the utility, the vintage coolness, and the memory of loved one you may or may not have met all go with it...
Proverbs 27:17    "As iron sharpens iron, a friend sharpens a friend"
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2021, 06:45:57 PM »
My dad didn't give anybody anything when he checked out.  I got his tackle box and in it were a couple of knives.  One was a Buck folder, a 501 model with dark maroon micarta scales.  I don't use it a lot but it is a well made knife and I like the drop point blade and the way the hollow grind was done.   
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2021, 07:09:37 PM »
Here's a couple pics of the two I mentioned.  Newer 90's one on the left, 60's on the right.  The 60's still locks up rock solid.  It's just got more blocky features to the shape and longer sweep in the blade profile shape. 



Proverbs 27:17    "As iron sharpens iron, a friend sharpens a friend"
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2021, 07:31:30 PM »
I remember the blade on my first one and liked it better than the newer one that replaced it.  Both of yours look to be in great condition.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2021, 08:47:45 PM »
Yeah I would prefer the earlier blade shape as well Stan.  It's more appealing to the eye and and seems to be a better slicer.  Wish Buck would do a throwback series and make a run of them new.  I would pick one up for sure.  I'm a little wary to really use the old one for dirty stuff as I would like Jack to have it one day and still want it to look nice.

As for the sheaths I use work boot cream/lotion on them and that has kept the leather really nice.  It even brought back the 60s one well.  But mine from the 90s has been on my hip more than any other knife in my life and it's still going strong after 25 years...

Stan I always thought the Schrade knock off was the best 110 clone.  My dad had one and it was arguably just as good for less than half the price I think.  Hard to contest that value.  He lost it at some point but I wouldn't hesitate to carry one.  If I remember I think CASE made a large lockback that looked good.  I have never owned one though. 
Proverbs 27:17    "As iron sharpens iron, a friend sharpens a friend"
http://outdoorenvy.blogspot.com/

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2021, 09:19:20 PM »
I have not had a Schrade or a Case in the 110 style either OE.  Nothing wrong with the Schrade as a few people I know have them but the only Case knives I see anymore are the trappers and stockman.  I have a stockman and like it for some things but not gutting and skinning. 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline Mannlicher

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2021, 05:50:28 AM »
I have always liked a good lockback folder.  I have another, a Buck 112 from the seventies that my son has taken possession of.  These range from a tiny Schrade to a Case XXchanger.  That one is on the far right, and has blades that pop in and out.  It has processed more than a few dead animals.
The Buck in the middle is my newest one, bought in 2015.  Done up by their custom shop, with carbon fiber scales, S30V steel


Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2021, 11:03:48 AM »
I have a few of those too.  I like the 112 and the Bucklite 110 probably the best.  There are couple of others, a 422 with synthetic scales about the same size as a 112 and a 501 which is much smaller and has a nice drop point blade.

I like the Custom Shop 110 you have and the Case with changeable blades is interesting.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2021, 07:10:31 AM »

  I don't see myself as much as a Philosopher or deep thinker, though some of my kids tell me that I am,  although I do find it interesting how the mind works in respect to memories, I also find it sad that the younger generations seem to have lost the ability to make and store memories,  at least it seems that way to me.
  I count myself as being very fortunate to have been born at a time in our history when so many new technological advancements have made our lives so much easier than my parents and grand parents had it, yet have been lucky enough to have experienced probably the last of this country's time of real individual freedoms.
  Part of the learning I got from my folks was the appreciation for the self reliance and adaptive skills that have served me so well throughout my life, and also the appreciation for good quality tools, whether they were tools for the field, for common repair, or for use in the kitchen creating great foods.
  One of the most important and probably most overlooked appreciation older generations had that seem to be fading away with todays times are memories,  I think part of the reason for this loss is the throw away mentality that's become so pervasive in our society today,  making things cheaper and maybe a bit less expensive usually means lowering the quality and in most cases the longevity of some things, so we aren't as apt to create a bond between our "things" and our past, mostly I guess because they don't last all that long, we have little need to maintain them, if they wear or break we can just discard them and purchase new ones.
  What's sad I find about this new normal  (I really hate that phrase, but I think it's here to stay) is that we unknowingly are tossing out memories along with all those "old" no longer needed things,  this thread is a good reminder to all of us that if we allow ourselves to consider quality over price when we purchase those things that we need, be it a newer vehicle, a new kitchen or hunting knife, or a new appliance for our homes,  those things will last over time with a little care and they have the ability to collect memories of good times we've enjoyed, especially with good friends and family.
  Funny how a little thing like a Buck 110 folding hunter can have a piece of ones history attached to it, like many of you I have an old Buck 110 folder that I bought when they first came out, I wore it on my belt for a few years when I was running my construction business, not because it was the best knife I could have, but mostly because it was iconic at the time, wearing one pointed you out as "someone who knew his stuff".
  Don't get me wrong the Buck 110 was a top quality knife that was tough, handy, and practically indestructible, but I never really had a lot of affection for it, it was heavy, and not very nimble in the hand,  and the steel that Buck used was hard to sharpen and tended to be very brittle ( as many Buck 110 owners with broken blade tips will attest to).
  Mine was no different,  one Sunday afternoon my wife and I were returning from a weekend camping trip on Cape Cod and were riding past the Cape Cod Canal where we stopped at a roadside stand for a bite to eat, while there I bought a dozen fresh oysters and being to lazy to dig into my campers kitchen I used my buck 110 to shuck the oysters, at about number seven I snapped about a quarter of an inch of tip off my Buck 110,  about a week or so later I met a new member at my local Rod & Gun club, he was a school teacher by trade, he loved to shoot and ride motorcycles as a hobby and also worked with metal, he made hand cast brass belt buckles as a side business, and he and his wife had a small farm.
  Well I told him about my knife and he asked to see it, he offered to reprofile the tip for me and I accepted he did a great job of not only repairing the blade tip so that it didn't show ever being broken, but he also "dehorned" the knife and rounded all the edges so that it was much more comfortable to use, and it also was the start of a long friendship that included allot of shooting, and introduced me to my first Holly Sportster,  I still have that Buck 110 today, and every time I look at it I'm reminded of allot of good friends, good times, and I bunch of different experiences, all from one old folding knife that I never did care for all that much.
  It's only one of my "Things".     
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2021, 08:49:54 PM »
What year was that Holly Sportster? 

I agree on the 110 Buck knives.  Great knife but the originals are pretty heavy and that 420 HC stainless they used was tough to sharpen. 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2021, 09:19:25 PM »
What year was that Holly Sportster? 


 !980 XLH,  best handling bike I ever owned,  most reliable bike I ever owned was a Triumph 650 Tiger,  most comfortable bike I ever owned was a Honda Goldwing 1100 touring bike with full Markham accessories, the very worst bike I ever owned was a 750 BSA Lightening,  that thing would vibrate itself loose just waiting for a traffic light to change color,  fastest bike I ever owned was a New 1982 Yamaha XS 1100.     
 Smoothest running bike I had was a new Kawasaki GS/GK Touring bike, sold it to buy the Gold Wing,  I've had others, but those above were the most memorable. 
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2021, 08:28:20 AM »
Well that covers the gamut. 

Most reliable bike I had was any one the Japanese bikes from a 1959 Honda 50 to a 2013 Super Tenere.  Nothing breaks (knock on wood) on those bikes.  The 1992 Yamaha 850 TDM was my favorite.  Fast, smooth, and reliable.

My short stint with a Triumph Bonneville proved two things.  First it was a bike that like your BSA in that you needed a magnet dragging along behind the bike to pick up the nuts and bolts and parts that fell off.  Second was it isn't just the Italians who cannot keep oil inside an engine case.  That Triumph leaked more oil than any bike I ever saw.  I was glad I did not buy that bike, just used it for a couple of months.  My PP memory was it was a 1960 model with the separate transmission.  I have read that today's Triumph Motorcycles are very good bikes but am not likely to buy another retro bike at my age.

I have ridden a lot of Harley's but just friends bikes and while I love the sound am influenced by the days that they were owned by AMF.  Sad time for the marque. 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline crashdive123

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2021, 07:17:17 PM »
I've had good luck with all of my bikes.  My first was a Kawasaki KZ 750 (traded for my beat up car while stationed in Virginia Beach and left on my first of several cross country motorcycle trip one month later).  My KH 750 (three cylinder two stroke) was probably the scariest that I owned.  Various dirt bikes (preferred the four strokes) along with a couple of bigger rice burners and a couple of Sportsters.  I am currently bikeless.

Offline boomer

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2021, 12:02:37 PM »
Buck 110  and motorcycles seemed to go together back in the day. Still do.

Keeping your knees in the breeze never gets old and like the lock backs technology may change but form and function remain. Had my share of Harleys over the decades but the only iron butts were on a Moto Guzzi. That was one fine machine - tractor tough and smooth cruising. Not the best handling (that was easily a Norton) or readily  accessible aftermarket stuff (Harleys by far) or highest mpg (newer BMW) but it always got the job done in comfort. Big, heavy, overbuilt, good lines and utterly reliable. Just like a 110.

A tourist in a rental car almost put an end to my cruising after 40 plus years. But there's a 1975 Beemer R90 that's getting put in shape for a few more adventures. Ill be taking the EDC Buck 110 with S30V along (beware the Buck custom shop).

Stay safe.and keep the shiny side up

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2021, 01:17:39 PM »
Dave I had a CB 750 Honda when the H1 and H2 bikes came out.  My Honda was a 13.8 second quarter mile bike at the altitude I lived then and those two stroke Kawasaki's just killed that Honda in the 1/4 mile.  The guys I knew who had them said they were ill handling and poor stopping but in a straight line they made you smile.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline crashdive123

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2021, 04:26:08 AM »
Dave I had a CB 750 Honda when the H1 and H2 bikes came out.  My Honda was a 13.8 second quarter mile bike at the altitude I lived then and those two stroke Kawasaki's just killed that Honda in the 1/4 mile.  The guys I knew who had them said they were ill handling and poor stopping but in a straight line they made you smile.

Your friend was absolutely correct.  I think they were billed as the fastest production bike in the world......between stop lights.

Offline Mannlicher

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2021, 06:09:11 AM »
speaking of Buck knives and motorcycles reminds me of the only time I ever used a knife on a person.  It's a long story, but in essence,  my Buck 112 stopped an assault on a woman.  The person doing the assault was a biker in full team colors.  The Buck opened the front of his leg like a watermelon.  Cops thanked me.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Folding Lockbacks
« Reply #19 on: September 06, 2021, 06:50:53 AM »
speaking of Buck knives and motorcycles reminds me of the only time I ever used a knife on a person.  It's a long story, but in essence,  my Buck 112 stopped an assault on a woman.  The person doing the assault was a biker in full team colors.  The Buck opened the front of his leg like a watermelon.  Cops thanked me.

  Sadly, every group has it's A$$ Wholes, and bikers are no different,  I had occasion to come between a few outlaw bikers and a young family on a camping weekend,  my wife and I were taking one of our long fall weekends on Cape Cod at a favored State Park for some much needed R&R and some excellent trout fishing,  I had pulled our camper van into a rest stop off Rt. 6 not far from the Borne Bridge to pour myself a coffee from our thermos (I had worked the night shift and hadn't slept before we left home).
  The rest stop was empty except for us and some folks at the far end of the rest area,  using my Nikon binos I could see a man, woman, and what appeared to be an infant in a baby carrier sitting on the picnic table, their car was small compact with a luggage carrier strapped to the roof, must have been on vacation.
  There were also three other men and a woman who were dressed in outlaw biker fashion,  and three bikes were parked by the table, I could see the young mothers face through the glass and she looked frightened,  my wife and I were both police officers and our agency required that we carry on and off duty, so both of us were armed,  back then very few people had cell phones, but we did have CB radios,  so I left my wife in the van with the glasses, her off duty handgun, and the CB tuned to CH-9 (the State Police monitored that channel 24/7 back then).
  I walked over to the group (about 75 yds. from our van), sat myself on the edge of the picnic table and calmly asked if anyone knew the exist number leading into Sandwich, in doing so I brush my Leans jacket aside and let my in the waistband Colt 1911 Officers Model come into plain view and hooked my thumb in my belt next to my holstered gun, it didn't take those guys long to fire up their monkey barred low riders and head back out onto Rt-6,  the first thing the woman did was to start sobbing, her husband stuck out his hand and said nothing else,  he looked pretty scared as well.
  The bikers may just have been having some fun scaring the couple, or they may have had something more in mind, I had no way of telling, but just the presents of that handgun in my belt was all that was needed to get them out of there. 
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.