Author Topic: House Heat  (Read 8234 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6789
  • Minnesota
House Heat
« on: February 27, 2012, 09:05:50 PM »
What do you guys have for a back up plan in case the power goes out and you need heat in the house?

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline rogumpogum

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2482
  • I like pickles.
Re: House Heat
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2012, 11:45:47 PM »
We have a wood stove, so... I think we're set. :)
"My common sense is tingling..."

Offline Frugal Bohemian

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 621
Re: House Heat
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2012, 08:10:24 AM »
We've got a wood stove.  It ain't gonna heat the whole house, but it'll keep the first level toasty enough.

And we could probably cook in/on it if need be too.
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16207
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: House Heat
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2012, 07:14:37 PM »
My "back up plan" is electric heat. ROFL!
I heat two homes with wood. The electric space heaters are a luxury for when we're too lazy to get up and feed the stove. If they weren't there, we'd just loose some sleep.  ;D
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6789
  • Minnesota
Re: House Heat
« Reply #4 on: February 29, 2012, 12:06:48 AM »
I live in a Trailor House out here.. so having a woodstove in it isnt an option.  Insurance co's squeal at the thought.

I have oil lamps and a gas stove that I'll light those up.  Crack a window and seal off the hallways to keep the main room warm.   

And six dogs.. and many blankets.

I was just curious on how you guys got heat in when in an emergency.      Some say woodstoves... are yours run by electricity at all?    Can you still run those stoves with out electric kicking on the fan/blower?

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline rogumpogum

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2482
  • I like pickles.
Re: House Heat
« Reply #5 on: February 29, 2012, 01:02:24 AM »
We just have a classic wood stove from the 1920s with white porcelain enameled sides, no electricity needed... It's not our main heat (baseboard water), but we run it downstairs anyway when it's really cold. If the power goes out we just close off the upstairs and keep the heat penned in.
"My common sense is tingling..."

Offline Gurthy

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1231
  • Member #9
    • My Blog: Gurthy's Bushcraft
Re: House Heat
« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2012, 07:04:51 AM »
I have a fireplace, but it's not very efficient nor is it in a good location in the house. It is in the family room, which is an addition, and is flanked by large sliding glass doors on both sides so it is not the warmest room to begin with. If I was building a new house it would have a traditional wood stove for sure.

I have a Buddy Heater which runs on propane and is indoor safe (has a low-O2 shut off, automaticlly turns off when tipped, etc.). It is good enough to heat the master bedroom to be comfortable for sleeping or the bathroom warm enough for bathing and that's pretty much all I'm worried about. Other than that it's "Put on a wool sweater and quit whining" at my house  ;)

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16207
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: House Heat
« Reply #7 on: February 29, 2012, 09:02:44 AM »

I was just curious on how you guys got heat in when in an emergency.      Some say woodstoves... are yours run by electricity at all?    Can you still run those stoves with out electric kicking on the fan/blower?

WW.
WW, I worked for an insurance company for awhile. There are companies out there that will underwrite riders for your main policy for wood stoves in mobile homes. But sometimes it's against County/Local ordinances.

Some people have fans in their air-tight stoves, but we just use the same table fan we use in the summer to help circulate the air. Only pellet stoves are dependent upon electricity to run their augers.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6789
  • Minnesota
Re: House Heat
« Reply #8 on: February 29, 2012, 09:50:54 AM »
OP.   I did ask our Insurance Co.  about having a woodstove.   I guess there are some being made now for Trailor houses.     The problem that was for us, is being too far out in the country.    They will see how many miles you are from the Fire Dept and let that be the judge.

My next house is going to have a fireplace in it, big enough to cook in.    **dreamy look**

WW.   

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16207
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: House Heat
« Reply #9 on: February 29, 2012, 10:32:30 AM »
The idea of a big fireplace with the stew pot hanging in it is a romantic one, but fireplaces are notoriously inefficient. For an existing fireplace, the best setup is an insert that is actually a wood stove vented up the chimney. Flush-mounted inserts are a waste...I've had one. The best solution is one that sticks out into the room a bit so the radiant heat is optimized. A lot of folks around here have that type, and the top of the stove can be used for cooking, in a pinch.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Frugal Bohemian

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 621
Re: House Heat
« Reply #10 on: February 29, 2012, 10:36:24 AM »
The idea of a big fireplace with the stew pot hanging in it is a romantic one, but fireplaces are notoriously inefficient.

I was going to say the same thing, but I bit my tongue.  I'm afraid I have the same dreamy look as WW.  I'd LOVE to have a fireplace to cook in like in some of the old East Coast colonial houses. I know it's not practical, but a fellow can dream, can't he?
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16207
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: House Heat
« Reply #11 on: February 29, 2012, 11:33:50 AM »
And then there's such a thing as "over-kill". Hahaha!


I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6789
  • Minnesota
Re: House Heat
« Reply #12 on: February 29, 2012, 12:20:01 PM »
Whoa.....      That thing would burn a forest a day ....   

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16207
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: House Heat
« Reply #13 on: February 29, 2012, 12:23:25 PM »
Whoa.....      That thing would burn a forest a day ....   

WW.
That's the lodge in Yellowstone Park. Seen in person it's mind-boggling!
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Frugal Bohemian

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 621
Re: House Heat
« Reply #14 on: February 29, 2012, 12:34:44 PM »
That's the lodge in Yellowstone Park. Seen in person it's mind-boggling!

Saw it a couple years ago myself, OP.  It's just incredible. 

On a side note:  We didn't tour the lodge until the day before we were set to leave, but when we inquired about rooms (this was mid-July too) they had a few available and they were relatively cheap!!  Around the same as a typical motel room, if I recall.  A housecleaner let us look around a room she was cleaning and it was super cozy and rustic.  So I'd recommend looking into it for anyone heading out to Yellowstone.
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline Wood Trekker

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1410
    • Wood Trekker
Re: House Heat
« Reply #15 on: February 29, 2012, 12:49:11 PM »
When I used to live in Bulgaria the heat used to go out all the time. We simply used more clothing and covered up with blankets. I've spent good chunks of the winter that way. Unless you are in an area where you can easily get wood and store it, maintaining a heat source is in many cases more effort than it is worth.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16207
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: House Heat
« Reply #16 on: February 29, 2012, 01:09:20 PM »
When I used to live in Bulgaria the heat used to go out all the time. We simply used more clothing and covered up with blankets. I've spent good chunks of the winter that way. Unless you are in an area where you can easily get wood and store it, maintaining a heat source is in many cases more effort than it is worth.
Funny how a person gets acclimatized to their environment. I split wood outside my door in my T-shirt when it's 20o out.

When I was in Viet Nam, the temperatures dropped at night to about 60o F for just a couple days. The folks in Saigon thought it was TEOTWAWKI! They were actually burning their furniture in their little charcoal cook stoves to stay warm! One compound actually had a bon fire going in the central plaza where residents could come out and huddle around. The only fuel available was broken up furniture. 
Sixty degrees!
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline PetrifiedWood

  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Administrator
  • Belt Grinder
  • ******
  • Posts: 11358
Re: House Heat
« Reply #17 on: February 29, 2012, 06:36:12 PM »
When I used to live in Bulgaria the heat used to go out all the time. We simply used more clothing and covered up with blankets. I've spent good chunks of the winter that way. Unless you are in an area where you can easily get wood and store it, maintaining a heat source is in many cases more effort than it is worth.
Funny how a person gets acclimatized to their environment. I split wood outside my door in my T-shirt when it's 20o out.

When I was in Viet Nam, the temperatures dropped at night to about 60o F for just a couple days. The folks in Saigon thought it was TEOTWAWKI! They were actually burning their furniture in their little charcoal cook stoves to stay warm! One compound actually had a bon fire going in the central plaza where residents could come out and huddle around. The only fuel available was broken up furniture. 
Sixty degrees!

Holy cow!

Reminds me of Louisiana. I used to think 40o F was really cold. Then I spent a few winters up in North Dakota and I got a new appreciation for cold. Now here in Utah it gets down in the low 20's in my area at night in the winter fairly regularly, though it occasionally dips into the negatives.  I'm surprised at how 60o feels like a warm day now.

Offline wgiles

  • Mill File+
  • *
  • Posts: 79
Re: House Heat
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2012, 06:11:55 PM »
When I added on to the house, I put in ground source heat pumps as my main heating and cooling system. In case of power failure, I put in a direct vent propane fireplace. The longest that we have been without power is three days, due to an ice storm, but we were reasonably comfortable. I have a thermostat on the propane fireplace, so I don't have to turn it on and off. I considered a wood fireplace, but decided against it for insurance reasons and because I don't want to fool with it. I have heated with wood and I'm not fond of it.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16207
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: House Heat
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2012, 06:17:59 PM »
... I considered a wood fireplace, but decided against it for insurance reasons and because I don't want to fool with it. I have heated with wood and I'm not fond of it.
Heating exclusively with wood is not for the faint of heart...or body. <ugh!>
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1173
  • A sense of humor is a good thing
Re: House Heat
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2012, 09:39:27 AM »
Heating exclusively with wood is not for the faint of heart...or body. <ugh!>

I'm trying to catch up on some of these great posts. When I went to college in Rapid City I lived in a cabin in the Black Hills way back in a canyon. The only heat we had was two wood burning stoves and a fireplace. We seldom use the fireplace to conserve on wood but did for special occasions like holidays or for fun. I chopped a lot of wood those years and it was the best time of my life. Our electricity went out all the time too so a lot of our light was from the stoves and candles. I have two of the Big Buddy Heaters like Gurthy has and they are great for a back up. I found this youtube video awhile ago on Perfection Oil Heaters. I would love to get a few of these. Does anyone here have one? These would be well perfection for me.

"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline wsdstan

  • Supporting Member
  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8590
Re: House Heat
« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2012, 05:04:50 PM »
The idea of a big fireplace with the stew pot hanging in it is a romantic one, but fireplaces are notoriously inefficient. For an existing fireplace, the best setup is an insert that is actually a wood stove vented up the chimney. Flush-mounted inserts are a waste...I've had one. The best solution is one that sticks out into the room a bit so the radiant heat is optimized. A lot of folks around here have that type, and the top of the stove can be used for cooking, in a pinch.

Hello OP.  Your right about that.  A couple of years ago I put a freestanding woodstove on my hearth and ran a stainless steel chimney up the flue.  It has worked great for us.  I can't shut the heat off in the very back of the house but it keeps the living room and kitchen warm.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)