Author Topic: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.  (Read 1997 times)

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Offline wsdstan

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Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« on: July 17, 2021, 09:34:46 PM »
I am posting these photos for Moe.  He sent me photos of his handiwork with flintlocks, leather bags, and related things like knife sheaths and  knives. 

I will post a new photo every so often as time allows.  Moe does some pretty impressive work, well worth a good look and ask a few questions should you have any.

These first photos show Moe and his wife's camp, and a few of his horns, a bag, hatchet, and related items like a powder measure and other shooting accessories.  The flintlock is one he made. 

Those of you who look closely will notice that some horns have untethered plugs while others are tethered with a leather thong.



 
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Offline Icepick15

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2021, 01:16:41 PM »
Very nice indeed.
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2021, 04:49:07 AM »
I don't own any "period" stuff, but I can sure appreciate the beauty and craftmanship that went in to that collection.

Offline boomer

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2021, 09:40:12 AM »
I don't own any "period" stuff, but I can sure appreciate the beauty and craftmanship that went in to that collection.


Agree completely. Very well donr

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2021, 06:17:49 PM »
Here are some of Moe's knives.  These would be home at any bush camp or reenactors setup.  I have one of Moe's sheaths for a Baby Bushcrafter we traded for and has worked well the last few years.

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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2021, 04:29:05 AM »
Great looking pieces.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2021, 06:12:15 AM »
Here are some of Moe's knives.  These would be home at any bush camp or reenactors setup.  I have one of Moe's sheaths for a Baby Bushcrafter we traded for and has worked well the last few years.



 The two bottom knives on the left, a Bowie and a scalping knife in the fringed sheath were gifted to members quite a while ago, the Bowie went to The Old Philosopher because he loved Bowie knives, and the Dadley styled Scalping knife and sheath went to wolfy who has an affection for Green River Dadley knives.   
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2021, 07:50:27 AM »
Another photo group.  Here are four of Moe's bags with accessories.  Nice stuff I think.  I especially like the bag with the green hearts.


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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2021, 06:23:06 PM »
Another photo group.  Here are four of Moe's bags with accessories.  Nice stuff I think.  I especially like the bag with the green hearts.




  Thanks again Stan for show casing some of my works,  the upper photo on the right is of a Colonial New England fowler bag,  but the musket and powder horn in the picture are the stars of that picture,  the musket is an original second model British Brown Bess that was found in a boarded up attic in an early Victorian house in Boston, the musket was found leaning against a chimney, the bayonet (made by Brown Bros. cutlery in London England in 1772)  was stuck in a roofing joist over the gun, and the remnants of a hunting bag mostly eaten away by mice was hanging off the bayonet along with the Powder horn, the horn was half full of crude black powder so the bugs didn't get to it and it's still in great condition, it's still carrying it's green tint from being packed in brine when it was shipped to the colonies from England, the musket itself was also in great shape and I carried it and shot blank charges out of it in Rev war events.
  When I bought it from a close friend who got it from a contractor customer of his,  it was loaded with about a hundred grains of BP under about 4" of dried kernel corn topped with what looked like either deteriorated paper or wasps nest, most likely used to kill garden pests.
 From papers found with the gun it appears the original owner was a British soldier who was part of the invading forces in 1812,  when the British pulled out of Washington he defected and fled to Boston, took on a new identity and live out the rest of his life in Boston,  one theory is that he got too old to do much, and boarded up most of the rooms in the house and live in one or two rooms that were easier to heat than a whole house.
 I owned the Bess and it's bayonet for about 25 years until a close friend and teacher of early American history made me an offer I couldn't refuse,  but I still have the horn in my collection.       
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2021, 06:28:51 PM »
They all look fantastic.  I reallty like the one on the bottom right.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2021, 06:49:08 PM »
They all look fantastic.  I reallty like the one on the bottom right.

  Crash, 
  I copied that bag from a photo in a book that documented original hunting bags and shot pouches from the 18th and early 19th centuries that survived and were either in museums or in private collections, supposedly it was one of the bags owned by Davey Crocket, the original was made from a boot top that had been cut in half lengthways, one half was folded over and sewed up the sides with a fringed strip added, the other half was used to make up the beaver tailed front flap. 
 I made mine from oiled tanned leather and it was assembled a bit differently, but it was a pretty close representation of the original.
  Thanks for the positive comment.   :cheers:
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Offline Chekmate

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2021, 08:34:36 PM »
That's really nice work.

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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2021, 04:56:05 PM »
Here are a few more of Moe's shooting bags.  I like them all.  There are more photos to come too so it ain't over yet.


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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2021, 05:13:33 PM »
Very neat stuff Moe!  Heck even the blankets they're on look cool.  Love the era of those items.  The knives look awesome and Old Philosopher better be using that bowie!  Thanks for the pics Moe and Stan
« Last Edit: July 24, 2021, 07:10:16 PM by OutdoorEnvy »
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2021, 05:14:33 PM »
Here are some of Moe's smaller bags.  Once again some really good stuff.  Tobacco tin and fire starter kit as well.

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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2021, 05:49:41 PM »
  Thanks again Stan for posting them,  and everyone who's enjoyed viewing and commented on them.    :thumbsup: :cheers:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2021, 06:36:31 PM »
 :cheers:  You're welcome Moe.  I still got about three more sets to go too.  I have not scanned that bunch yet and irrigation problems kept me busy today. 
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2021, 05:02:06 AM »
Those are every bit as cool as the others.  You can easily see the time and craftmanship that went into making them.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #18 on: July 25, 2021, 06:07:56 AM »
:cheers:  You're welcome Moe.  I still got about three more sets to go too.  I have not scanned that bunch yet and irrigation problems kept me busy today.

  LOL,  this ain't no race,  like I said when I mailed them to you,  I'm in no hurry,  and to be honest I haven't looked at them in quite a while and I'm enjoying them as much as all of you guys are. 
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #19 on: July 25, 2021, 07:59:39 PM »
Okay, now some more powder horns from Moe.  These are the first batch and I tried to sort the photos by horn color a bit.  These are the lighter colored horns (except a couple in the lower left) and the next batch will be darker ones.

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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2021, 08:51:15 PM »
Very neat!  So Moe how do you source the horns?  Did you make a rancher a nice knife and now he owes you for life? LOL!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #21 on: July 26, 2021, 06:47:50 AM »
Very neat!  So Moe how do you source the horns?  Did you make a rancher a nice knife and now he owes you for life? LOL!

  No, most of the horns were bought at rendezvous,  and some were purchased from a small shop in Lebanon CT. where I used to shoot line shoots and woods walks, the shop owner had acreage and used to run M/L shoots once a month,  many of those that attended (including myself) formed a club and later reestablished the area Militia Unit for reenactments,  the first one we held was on the Green in Lebanon CT. in 1976 at the home of Gov. Johnathan Trumbull,  who became one of Washington's most trusted friends and advisor,  Washington once referred to him as "My First Patriot",  He was commissioned by Washington as a Lt. Colonel and served as Washington's Secretary throughout the Rev. war.
  Trumbull was the the only colonial Governor to support the American Revolution at it's start, It was Trumbull who commissioned Nathan Hale as an officer in the Continental Army,  Trumbull was contacted by Gen. Gates who was the British Commanding General when the war broke out and asked to send the Ct. Militia to Boston to back up Crown Troops who were pinned down in Boston,  Trumbull answered Gates by telling him the CT, Militia was already in Boston, fortifying Bunker Hill against Gates Army.
  Gates  so hated Trumbull that he ordered a small detachment to find Trumbull and kill him as a traitor, Washington's spies uncovered the plan and Trumbull was told of it,  Trumbull owned a large farm, had a huge grain mill, and ran a Waling business as well as being Gov. of CT.,  so he had an office built about a hundred yards from his house,  it was his practice to walk to his office after breakfast every morning to conduct business,  when Trumbull got word of the plot he had a tunnel constructed from his house to his office,  and Gates team of assassins was foiled,  interesting story.
 Soon I'll tell you all a funny story about that 1976 battle reenactment on the Lebanon Green across from Gov. Trumbull's "War" office.           

 Back to the horns, most horns used to make commercial powder horns today and for the last 50 or so years come from Mexico,  most are very brittle and straight shaped, when they are processed in Mexico they are buffed smooth by machine which adds to their brittleness, so they aren't used by real Horners to make quality horn products,  most of the good quality raw horns come from north America and Europe,  a quality Horner hand picks his horns according to size, shape, color, and what it will be used for,  good quality horns command a premium price,  that's how I choose my horns and all of my horns were hand made with hand tools, and the plugs were hand done and the pegs I used to fasten the plugs to the horns were long thorns I gathered from climbing brier trees. 
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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #22 on: July 26, 2021, 07:17:09 AM »
That's quite the history lesson Moe!  Very interesting, looking to hearing the details on Trumbull.  As for the horns that is crazy you use thorns to lock in the plug.  What's total time in a powder horn when it's done?  It's kind of one of those things that would be fun to do at some point in life, like making a knife.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #23 on: July 26, 2021, 03:19:15 PM »
That's quite the history lesson Moe!  Very interesting, looking to hearing the details on Trumbull.  As for the horns that is crazy you use thorns to lock in the plug.  What's total time in a powder horn when it's done?  It's kind of one of those things that would be fun to do at some point in life, like making a knife.

 How much time it's takes to make a powder horn depends on how much time you want to put into it,  starting with a raw dried horn with the meaty plug removed,  the very first thing you should do is locate the center of the inside of the horn at the spout end, they are all different,  you do this with a wire (like a metal coat hanger) bent to the shape of the inside curve of the horn, then you mark it on the outside, now you're ready to drill out the spout hole, if you are very, very, lucky and don't drill through the side of the horn, you can move on to trimming the butt end of the horn on an angle that matches the shape of the horn.
 You do this first because if you drill through the side making the hole you'll have to find something else to make with it, it won't ever make a powder horn,  locating and successfully drilling out the spout will take about two hours on average, to get a raw horn to look good you have to scrape it with a scraping tool, if you sand it it'll never be smooth, you'll end up with tiny slivers of horn sticking up through the whole process, like the grain on wood when sanding it, it can be done, but there's a process to it, scraping is the best and fastest way,  depending on how rough the horn is that can take you 6~8 hours.
 Next you need to carve the butt plug,  but first you'll need to make a cone shaped piece of hardwood with which to shape the butt end of the horn,  after you boil it to soften it up so that you get a perfectly round butt on the horn, between carving the cone mold, boiling the horn until it's soft, and carving the finished plug you'll have at least another 8 hours invested.
 You need to take your time carving the plug because it needs to fit perfectly, you can't glue it in place,  if you do and the powder should ever catch a spark you'll be holding on to a pipe bomb, the plug should be sealed with bee's wax to make it water tight and leak proof, but able to be pushed out under pressure to avoid exploding, it's just smart safety sense, you can use brads, tacks, or match sticks to pin the plug to the horn, I use thorns because it period correct.
 Well, now you have about 20 hours into it and it's time to carve the outside of the horn starting with the spout, how much time will depend on the amount of work it takes to complete, a plain horn with just a staple at each end to hold a strap will only take about an hour,  but a banded horn with a carved spout, and a bit of engrailing could run another 8 hours, and add another 10 hours if you want it engraved with a map, or period correct figures,  so a decent horn with a little carving and outlining can average out to almost a weeks worth of work.
 But if you like to craft thing, cars, furniture, what ever,  when you get into it time seems to be not very important,  and sometimes a project will run away with you and you can't stop improving on it,  other time it tells you when enough is enough,  when less is more.
 There are allot of videos on working with horns on u-tube if you think you'd like to try it,  if you decide I may have a raw horn laying around I could send you.   
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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2021, 07:23:47 PM »
Thanks for the walk through Moe.  Had no idea it would be that much work.  I don't think I'm going to be ready for that any time soon.  I have a lot of projects already awaiting their turn.  I'll keep in mind though for future but don't want you to waste one on me for now.  I'll give you a shout if I get around to wanting a go at one. 
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #25 on: July 26, 2021, 08:39:01 PM »
Thanks for the walk through Moe.  Had no idea it would be that much work.  I don't think I'm going to be ready for that any time soon.  I have a lot of projects already awaiting their turn.  I'll keep in mind though for future but don't want you to waste one on me for now.  I'll give you a shout if I get around to wanting a go at one.

      :thumbsup:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #26 on: July 27, 2021, 12:12:05 PM »
Here is the last photo group in this thread.  Two horns that are darker than some of the others.  I really like the one on the right, it is just a wonderful color and shape. 

Then there is a photo of Moe and his wife in camp.  Thanks to him for coming up with this thought for a thread and I sure enjoyed seeing all the great stuff he has made.  Thanks Moe.

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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2021, 03:27:47 PM »
Here is the last photo group in this thread.  Two horns that are darker than some of the others.  I really like the one on the right, it is just a wonderful color and shape. 

Then there is a photo of Moe and his wife in camp.  Thanks to him for coming up with this thought for a thread and I sure enjoyed seeing all the great stuff he has made.  Thanks Moe.



  Thank you Stan for doing your magic and getting them posted.   :thumbsup:

  The horn that you mentioned on the right is just a perfect horn in size, shape, and color,  I choose it for one of my personal horns,  and engraved about the whole body of the horn with a map and a legend on one side,  the legend  reads in script "WHAT PRICE LIBERTY", and under that "BLOOD", on a smaller line under that is HMM. His Horn.
  Now for the map,  one side of the map it starts with Boston Harbor and a road (Monotomey Rd.) later renamed Battle Road, it leads north from Boston through Lexington on the way to Concord where a store of arms, powder, and shot was being kept by the Rebel trouble makers,  Gen. Gates wanted them seized and sent a large detachment of British troops to get it done.
  Again, the Committee of 100 had it's spies watching the Red Coats movements,  when the British troops marched out of Boston riders were sent to different parts of MA., RI., CT., and NH. and the Militia's were alerted and began moving towards Concord. 
  The Rt. that they choose was close to where Rt 495 is today,  the Militia's from southern MA., CT. and RI. choose to assemble at a nearby lake near a Nipmuck Indian village (about five miles from my house) from there they marched toward Concord, and many got there just in time to join the rebels to defend Concord and sent the British fleeing back to Boston,  the map on that horn includes the route that both factions took including land marks, rivers, swamps, and villages that they passed through, and shows the embattlements that were raised at Bunker Hill (actually Breeds Hill) over looking Charlestown Harbor. 
  When I finished it I showed it to my History buff wife,  the moment I handed it to her to examine it was the last time that it was my horn,  it's been her horn ever since,  she keeps it in a glass faced wooden case,  it's not so much the actual horn that moves her, it's the bravery and sacrifice that those future Americans made for our freedoms,  and the sadness she feels thinking that we may not have those kinds of Patriots here today,  and that we may very well lose that treasure that they sacrificed for.    :shrug:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2021, 04:46:53 PM »
Thanks for adding that information.  My several greats grandfather was a soldier in a Virginia regiment during the Revolution.  He fought at several important battles, was at Valley Forge that winter, and was captured and then rescued along with others during the war.  He moved to Surry county North Carolina after the war.  I often wonder what happened to his horn.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2021, 04:52:26 PM by wsdstan »
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Moe's camp and Colonial era gear.
« Reply #29 on: July 28, 2021, 03:23:18 AM »
Great stuff.  Thank you Moe and Stan for your collaberation to get them posted.