Author Topic: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.  (Read 1639 times)

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Offline wsdstan

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Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« on: February 20, 2017, 06:30:36 PM »
Got my flintlock trade gun out today and tried a few patterning shots to see how it does with a new loading method for shot.  I wanted to see how the new method compared to my old method.  In the past I loaded the trade rifle with powder, an over powder card, a wad, shot, and an over shot thin card.  At 25 yards it would kill a turkey but I never took it out.

In reading about smoothbores and turkey hunting there was a post in another site about putting the fiber wad on top of the shot column instead of below it.  It sounded odd but what the heck?  It turned out tighter than the standard method so we will see come turkey season.

The load is 85 grns. of 2f black powder, a heavy card, 1 1/4 Oz. of number 5 shot, a 1/2" fiber wad was placed over the shot charge.  The smoothbore trade gun is a 20 gauge, has a Chambers lock, Track of Wolf barrel, and a custom walnut stock.  It has made by a Black Hills fellow who dabbles in bp guns, hawks, knives, and so forth.  It took me awhile to get the flint and frizzen angle on this one just right but, at the moment, it is getting reliable ignition. I have more work to do and will use 3f powder next time.

A photo of one of the patterning targets shot at 25 yards is below as well as one of the lock on the trade gun.





 
 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2017, 07:23:00 PM »
Looks like you might be on to something there, Stan.  I haven't ever tried a fiber wad on top of the shot column, but I will.  That target looks like that particular load works satisfactorily in your piece. :thumbsup:

Old V.M. Starr, the South Dakota muzzleloading shotgun guru, recommended trying only an overpowder wad with no additional wad first, before experimenting with other more 'exotic' wad columns.  He was famous for cutting 'jug chokes' in muzzleloaders because of the difficulty in getting wads down the barrels of conventionally choked tubes.  I've got his book around here.......someplac e. :-\
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2017, 09:01:46 PM »
I read an article by Starr that was about ML shotguns.  He did use one or two 3/32" wads over the powder and 1 over the shot.  I have done that but in this particular ML this over shot felt wad is tighter patterning than Starr's method, at least with the loads I have tried.   

Starr also shot pretty well from his comments and used loads in a 20 bore that are lighter than mine.  I have a habit, on Turkey, of wanting 1 1/4 oz of shot.  I will back it down to 1 oz. and see if it still patterns well. 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2017, 09:34:07 PM »
Starr's book is free online now.  I figured it was pertinent to the thread and others who are also into such foolishness might find it useful, so.....

http://home.insightbb.com/~bspen/starr.html
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2017, 10:00:56 PM »
I got it on-line as well wolfy.  His comments are good I think.  I really like what he said about what to do to your gun if you're using it over a two or three day period without a full cleaning.  That might be happening during a Turkey season where you can get more than one bird. 
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Offline upthecreek

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2017, 05:46:32 PM »
That looks like a beautiful gun you have there stan. Shot pattern aint bad either.

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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2017, 09:28:11 PM »
Thanks Creek.  I like the gun.  It is fairly light compared to my other ML guns.  I debated the barrel length but went long (42") but might have liked 36" better for a Turkey gun.  I talked with Jim Chambers, the man who owns Chambers locks, and he gave me some pointers and suggested I drill out the flash hole if I wan't going to shoot in contests as you get a bit better ignition.  So far he has been right.

The pattern is pretty good.  There is a hint of a donut hole about where the Turkeys neck joins the body and I am going to work on that.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2017, 02:44:02 PM »
  Stan,

 As usual, my two cents worth,  I could be wrong (it happens sometimes) but it may not be the fiber wad itself that's closing up your pattern,  it could be the slight increase in pressure caused by the restrictive nature of the fiber wad placed in front of the shot charge.
  When I got my first French Fusil I had it custom built by a guy whose 'vous name was Sweet William, he was a well known gun builder up and down the east coast,  I ordered the flintlock fowler and gave him a deposit at the spring Original North East Rendezvous and picked it up a year later at the next one,  it was a beautiful copy of a "D" model Fusil de Chasse, but to my surprise it didn't shoot as good as it looked.
  About a year and allot of trying later I sold it and purchased another,  and then a third, all of them shot low,  I had to cover the target with the barrel in order to hit the black with Ball or Shot,  talk about disappointment, I was about ready to give up on smoothbore flinters,  about the same time (late '70's) I had a close on line friend from Priest river Idaho by the name of Bill Odem, Bill went by the name of Three Toes and had a web site called Bill's world of Buckskinning.
  Bill spent more time in his hunting shirt and moccasins than he did in his jeans and cowboy shirt, and more time hunting and woods running with his flintlock trade gun than any other he owned,  so one day I confided in him and told him about my smoothbore situation,  He asked me what I used for a load and shot charge,  I told him that I'd tried different loads but usually about 90 grns. of Goex 2-F, an over powder wad, 1-1/4 oz. of shot, and an over powder wad,  or in the case of a round ball, same powder and charge weight and a patched round ball.
  Bill told me to try his pet load, but to follow it to the letter,  for a load of shot, 85 grns. of 3-F, one over powder card wad, one lubed fiber wad, one thin over powder card wad, the 1-1/4 ~ 1-1/2 ounce of shot and one over shot card wad.
  For round ball, use the same powder charge, over powder card wad, lubed fiber wad, and a patched round ball,  I tried his loads and I cut the bulls eye every time at 25 yds from a rest with the ball,  and my shot pattern was as right on and as good as any of my modified choke shotguns at 30 ~ 35 yds.
  When I told Bill about my surprise at my new found smoothbore accuracy,  he sent me a LOL and explained that allot of people have the same problem with their smoothbores,  he did also starting out until an old greybeard schooled him on the finer points of smoothbore fowlers and the importance of maintaining a certain level of load pressure,  too little pressure and you shoot low,  too much and you blow shot pattern.
  My favorite smoothbore flinter is my .62 cal./20 gage original Centermark Fusil de Chasse,  it's as good if not quite as pretty as my custom flinters,  but it's not afraid of the woods, if you get my drift.

  I think there's a possibility that the fiber wad being in front of the shot charge offers a bit more resistance and ups the pressure just enough to increase velocity and tighten up your group,  If you want to experiment a little, try using 85 grns. of 3-F powder, over powder wad, fiber wad, thin card wad, shot, and top with a thick over powder wad or two thin over shot wads,  I'll bet you get as good or better a shot pattern as when using the fiber wad in reverse.     

  Another way to tighten your group is to use a .20 ga. plastic shot cup, cut the foot off the shot cup, load it right over the over fiber wad, pour in you powder charge, top with an over shot wad.
  It's ok to use a 1 ounce 20 ga. shot cup with a 1-1/2 ounce shot charge.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2017, 02:51:33 PM by Moe M. »
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2017, 03:20:36 PM »
T'all talking about this....make me want to give the French Fusil a try.....

Moe, can you explain the loading order in the last lines?

Quote> Another way to tighten your group is to use a .20 ga. plastic shot cup,..... cut the foot off the shot cup, load it right over the over fiber wad,...... pour in you powder charge????,....... top with an over shot wad.
  It's ok to use a 1 ounce 20 ga. shot cup with a 1-1/2 ounce shot charge.

Thanks.
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Offline gizamo

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2017, 04:44:41 PM »
Another option is jug choking the barrel. It definitely works....

Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2017, 04:56:48 PM »
Another option is jug choking the barrel. It definitely works....

How did  you do yours?....Heard of them....never seen one.
Doesn't it mess up a patched round ball?
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2017, 06:48:47 PM »
Hunter thanks for the information.  I have shot a load of shot very similar to that stack of wads and shot with some success but it starts to get a pretty big donut hole in it with 85 grs. of 2F and 1 1/4 oz. of shot.  On another forum there was a guy who talked about the fiber wad on top of the stack and what it did for his smoothbore.  It very well could be that the friction from the fiber wad is tightening up patterns.  The targets I shot with the turkey loads didn't vary much and I was getting 10 or more pellets in the head and neck with all of them.

I will try your suggested load (exactly) next time I shoot and see if it is any tighter. 

I don't use plastic shot cups in my ML guns simply because I would rather try to use what they used.  As a last resort I would use one if it could get me a full choke pattern.   :)
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2017, 06:50:51 PM »
Another option is jug choking the barrel. It definitely works....

I have read about them and have the name around here somewhere of a guy I could send the gun to.  It would be good to have that done and I could get the barrel cut down a bit at the same time.  Worth thinking about and thanks for the suggestion.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2017, 07:10:01 PM »
Al Vanbuskirk, my gunsmith buddy, has done jug choke conversions on some of his stuff, but I don't know if he still does that kind of thing or not.  He's pretty well avalanched with gun work right now......that I do know.
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2017, 08:36:04 PM »
I can see the usefulness of a fiber over shot wad if you are carrying it around....just cardboard card may not hold the shot very tight.
I think I would use one just for that reason.
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2017, 08:55:13 PM »
I have a supply of thick 1/8" cards, quite stiff material, that when seated with mild pressure on a shot column seems to hold well.  It is pretty hard so it doesn't lube well.  The fiber wad lubes well and does reduce fouling a bit but when lubed must be used fairly quickly or it swells up and you cannot fit it into the bore.

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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2017, 05:52:44 AM »
T'all talking about this....make me want to give the French Fusil a try.....

Moe, can you explain the loading order in the last lines?

Quote> Another way to tighten your group is to use a .20 ga. plastic shot cup,..... cut the foot off the shot cup, load it right over the over fiber wad,...... pour in you powder charge????,....... top with an over shot wad.
  It's ok to use a 1 ounce 20 ga. shot cup with a 1-1/2 ounce shot charge.

Thanks.

 First off, if you're going to try a plastic shot cup (wad), make sure it's the right gauge size for your gun,  I said 20 ga. because Stan has mention before that his trade gun is a 20 gauge,  I have three,  a New England Fowler in 12 gauge, my Center Mark French Fusil in 20 guage, and an original (circa 1850) English sxs cap & ball shotgun that the bores measure 15 gauge.
 For my 20 ga. I use a standard 1 ounce plastic Winchester 20 ga. cushion wad,  I cut off the cushion foot, and use just the shot cup part of the wad,  the loading order is powder charge, over powder wad, lubed fiber cushion wad, plastic shot cup,  shot charge, over shot card wad,  in a single shot smoothbore you really don't need a heavy card wad to hold the shot charge, in a double where the second charge could be dislodged it pays to be more careful.

 I rarely use a plastic shot cup in my fowlers as most of my shots are within 25 yd. or so,  I do use them in my sxs English Sporting gun,  I use that one mostly for Pheasant and Partridge hunting where 35~ 40 yard shots are not uncommon, the shot cups hold the shot together longer and give me an extra ten yards of tighter pattern.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2017, 07:55:20 AM »
A 40 yard killing shot with a 15 gauge muzzleloader on a tough & wily old Nebraska ringneck would certainly be a test of my Navy Arms 12 gauge double AND its owner! :hail:
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2017, 12:44:34 PM »
T'all talking about this....make me want to give the French Fusil a try.....

Moe, can you explain the loading order in the last lines?

Quote> Another way to tighten your group is to use a .20 ga. plastic shot cup,..... cut the foot off the shot cup, load it right over the over fiber wad,...... pour in you powder charge????,....... top with an over shot wad.
  It's ok to use a 1 ounce 20 ga. shot cup with a 1-1/2 ounce shot charge.

Thanks.

 First off, if you're going to try a plastic shot cup (wad), make sure it's the right gauge size for your gun,  I said 20 ga. because Stan has mention before that his trade gun is a 20 gauge,  I have three,  a New England Fowler in 12 gauge, my Center Mark French Fusil in 20 guage, and an original (circa 1850) English sxs cap & ball shotgun that the bores measure 15 gauge.
 For my 20 ga. I use a standard 1 ounce plastic Winchester 20 ga. cushion wad,  I cut off the cushion foot, and use just the shot cup part of the wad,  the loading order is powder charge, over powder wad, lubed fiber cushion wad, plastic shot cup,  shot charge, over shot card wad,  in a single shot smoothbore you really don't need a heavy card wad to hold the shot charge, in a double where the second charge could be dislodged it pays to be more careful.

 I rarely use a plastic shot cup in my fowlers as most of my shots are within 25 yd. or so,  I do use them in my sxs English Sporting gun,  I use that one mostly for Pheasant and Partridge hunting where 35~ 40 yard shots are not uncommon, the shot cups hold the shot together longer and give me an extra ten yards of tighter pattern.

Thanks....... that cleared things up......
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2017, 10:05:22 AM »
A 40 yard killing shot with a 15 gauge muzzleloader on a tough & wily old Nebraska ringneck would certainly be a test of my Navy Arms 12 gauge double AND its owner! :hail:

  I don't know if Nebraska Pheasants are tougher than our New England birds,  but if they are I guess all you can do is get a bigger gauge with a tighter full choke tube,  I don't hunt with dogs any more so my shots (when I get one) could be at longer ranges,  I don't usually take a long shot in the woods but will chance one in an open field or high tension line.
 My usual load for my sxs is 60 grains of 3-F, 1-1/4 ounce of #5 shot in a plastic shot cup,  and I get out in front of the bird by a good margin,  like everyone else I miss at times, but not very often.
 I do have an advantage, I shoot allot of Trap, Skeet, and Sporting Clays.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2017, 03:24:00 PM »
My 12 ga. Navy Arms double is bored 'cylinder' and 'improved cylinder' and that's too danged far to expect that choke combination to knock cocks stiff at 40 yds.  :rolleyes:

I just shoot birds.....them skeets is just too danged crunchy! :lol:
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Offline madmax

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2017, 03:46:53 PM »
Gonna try some turkey hunting this spring.  Nothing fancy with the firearm.  Rem 870.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2017, 04:00:05 PM »
Gonna try some turkey hunting this spring.  Nothing fancy with the firearm.  Rem 870.

My shotgun of choice for forty or more years.  With a extra full choke and 3" No. 5 shotshells it will knock em' dead at 45 yards. 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2017, 04:02:28 PM »
^THAT I can believe. 8)
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Offline madmax

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2017, 04:15:50 PM »
I know where I'm going to hunt.  Seen them there for years.  Not sure whether to call or not.  I think I'll just Hide and Hope.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2017, 05:00:03 PM »
If you can find where they are roosting the night before you have a chance with hide and hope..  If you learn to make of simple call sounds like a yelp and maybe a soft putt you might be surprised how quick they come in. 

A box call would be my first choice.  I use mouth calls these days but still carry a slate and a box call.  Lots of fun.
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2017, 06:41:15 PM »
Calling is the best part in the spring....Last spring was 45 min for leaving my driveway to getting back.... #22 tom.
Fall is more bushwhacking them on their way some where.

Set up..... get ready....call out a yelp or two......listen.... .then a long nasty yelp...with clucks at the end....
Don't hear anything.....just sit for 15 -20 min and try again.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2017, 06:43:22 AM »
My 12 ga. Navy Arms double is bored 'cylinder' and 'improved cylinder' and that's too danged far to expect that choke combination to knock cocks stiff at 40 yds.  :rolleyes:

I just shoot birds.....them skeets is just too danged crunchy! :lol:

  Well old friend, there may be allot of reasons why you feel that 40 yds. is too much to expect from a cylinder bore or Imp. cylinder smoothbore front stuffer, but none are likely caused by ability of the gun to get the job done.
  As for anything learned in life whether it's wing shooting birds,  orange clays, or being a successful farmer,  very few people can do it once in a while and expect to be really good at it,  it takes devotion and allot of practice to acquire some skills,  especially so in the shooting sports.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline madmax

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2017, 07:09:34 AM »
I read that you shouldn't wear red, white, blue, or black.  My gun's black.  Do I need to wrap it or something.  I see "Turkey guns" for sale that are black.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #29 on: February 25, 2017, 07:59:22 AM »
My 12 ga. Navy Arms double is bored 'cylinder' and 'improved cylinder' and that's too danged far to expect that choke combination to knock cocks stiff at 40 yds.  :rolleyes:

I just shoot birds.....them skeets is just too danged crunchy! :lol:

  Well old friend, there may be allot of reasons why you feel that 40 yds. is too much to expect from a cylinder bore or Imp. cylinder smoothbore front stuffer, but none are likely caused by ability of the gun to get the job done.
  As for anything learned in life whether it's wing shooting birds,  orange clays, or being a successful farmer,  very few people can do it once in a while and expect to be really good at it,  it takes devotion and allot of practice to acquire some skills,  especially so in the shooting sports.
If you say so. :hail:
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #30 on: February 25, 2017, 08:29:43 AM »
I read that you shouldn't wear red, white, blue, or black.  My gun's black.  Do I need to wrap it or something.  I see "Turkey guns" for sale that are black.

Black shotguns aren't the problem.....lots' of black stuff in the woods....but not black "shiney"........
There is camo tape, paint or even a camo sock.
Turkey gun generally refers to a shorter barrel shotgun  24", 26"...with a extra tight full choke....can be anodised or camo'ed
I don't think it matters all that much....most camo anything os designed to look good to other people ...not birds and animals.

More important....sit still and don't make eye contact....they see movement, from a long way off and hear a pin drop at 100 yds.
Remember there are always "woods noises" some time so loud you can't hear the turkeys...but any "out of place sound"
may attract attention.
I use one decoy to attract their attention away from me.


Red, white,  blue ....is colors associated with a turkeys head......Safety concern.....
You wouldn't want to have some one mistake you red/white head wrap or bandana as a turkeys head.
Normally turkey heads are a blueish white, but get real red when the are strutting ...(horny, looking to mate).
« Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 08:35:01 AM by hunter63 »
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Offline madmax

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #31 on: February 25, 2017, 01:50:35 PM »
Thanks. My gun is flat black.  Might have to change out my varnished wood stock and forearm to my Hogue flat black ones.  I have a modified choke in a 26" barrel now.  I have a 18.5" slug barrel but that won't work.  I will have to hit the range with a full and at least an extra full to see my comfort range.  Maybe a turkey choke too.

BTW.  I have never seen such camoed up hunters as turkey hunters around here.  Head to toe... with face paint.  My snake boots are brown and I'm not putting makeup on just yet.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 01:57:29 PM by madmax »
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #32 on: February 25, 2017, 03:07:56 PM »
You do want some kind of choked barrel...full extra full...turkey XXfull LOL
Then pattern it.....for sure
Slug barrel not so good...rifling really messes up am patten....

Even the flintlock shooters try out the best load in their smooth bores....

Best ammo I have found is Remington Duplex 4X6 lead 3"

Camo tape.....
http://www.cabelas.com/product/BOW-GUN-TAPE-REALTREE-XTRA/1636306.uts?productVariantId=3537475&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=03720987&rid=20&gclid=Cj0KEQiA88TFBRDYrOPKuvfY2pIBEiQA97Z8MRDrefYeh6II0Vh-z0k11ojrdZA_WV0mlmOC-t31RO8aAgCk8P8HAQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

Have used regular masking tape with spray paint....
Half the fun is to camo everything....LOL.

After this thread was thinking about the bright brass on my  fusil ......was thinking shoe polish?
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Offline madmax

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #33 on: February 25, 2017, 03:23:42 PM »
Sorry for the derail.  I do want to learn more about BP.  I just got excited about turkey hunting and found a WMA within 30 min that is a walk on no quota spring turkey hunt.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
Hunter S, Thompson

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #34 on: February 25, 2017, 04:19:16 PM »
Thanks. My gun is flat black.  Might have to change out my varnished wood stock and forearm to my Hogue flat black ones.  I have a modified choke in a 26" barrel now.  I have a 18.5" slug barrel but that won't work.  I will have to hit the range with a full and at least an extra full to see my comfort range.  Maybe a turkey choke too.

BTW.  I have never seen such camoed up hunters as turkey hunters around here.  Head to toe... with face paint.  My snake boots are brown and I'm not putting makeup on just yet.

Your snake boots are fine.  Camoed up is good when hunting turkey, at least a camo mesh coat over earth tones if you don't like camo.  Wear a face mask, your face is like a bright light in the woods,  to a turkey at least.  Try the slug barrel with a turkey choke if it set up for one.  That length of barrel is perfect.  The sights on slug barrels work well with shot too.  If it is a rifled barrel maybe not. 
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2017, 12:10:38 PM »
Turkey season opened Saturday but it took me until this morning to call a good Tom in close.  I saw a lot of birds everyday but yesterday but none got within range of the Flintlock.  Had a couple at 40 yards, one at about 35 yards earlier in the season but they just wouldn't close that last few yards.  So I went conventional this morning and got one at 30 paces.  Go figure huh? Nice bird, heavy but it great shape.  Still a little fat on him and his wing tips were not chewed up too much.  Nine inch beard which is about the high end of average around these parts. 

He came off the roost at 5:45 AM, 26 degrees F, no wind.  Landed about 75 yards away and put on a good display for about ten minutes.  Used soft clucks and one five note yelp and here he came.  Got to see him all the way in which was a treat as he was turning and gobbling the whole way. 

We are gonna eat good soon. 

The place I was hunting this morning along the river.


Loaded up and going back to the house.



« Last Edit: April 11, 2017, 01:10:19 PM by wsdstan »
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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2017, 07:55:27 PM »
That's a nice bird, Stan.....CONGRATULA TIONS! :cheers:   Too bad you had to resort to the modern artillery, but then again....discretion IS the better part of valor! 8)

Don't forget to set an extra plate at the table for me. :drool: :lol:
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Offline imnukensc

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #37 on: April 11, 2017, 08:04:52 PM »
Congrats, Stan.  Nice bird!
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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #38 on: April 11, 2017, 08:12:50 PM »
Yes, congrats Stan on a good bird!!  The thought went through my mind...he changed guns, I wonder if he got one closer this time...   I wish you could have used the BP gun, but glad you got one regardless!!

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2017, 08:38:09 PM »
Thanks.  I have one tag left and five more weeks.  We shall see what unfolds.  :)
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #40 on: April 11, 2017, 09:01:28 PM »
Congrats ....nice bird!
My season starts on the 26th.....
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #41 on: April 11, 2017, 10:05:07 PM »
Congrats ....nice bird!
My season starts on the 26th.....

Thanks.  I am curious with a start date of the 26th how long does the season go and are the birds mating that late into the Spring in Wisconsin?
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #42 on: April 11, 2017, 11:39:03 PM »
Actually mine is the second season.....
2017 Youth turkey hunt   April 15 - 16
Spring 2017
Period A   April 19 - 25
Period B   April 26 - May 2
Period C   May 3 - 9
Period D   May 10 - 16
Period E   May 17 - 23
Period F   May 24 - 30
Turkey are still real active thru the 1st 2nd and  3rd seasons....than tapers off....
And you can't see as well in the woods as everything is leafed out...hens are nesting...so you get the real horny big birds  and some jakes. in the last three seasons.


Fall 2017
Zones 1 - 5   September 16 - Dec. 31
Zones 6 & 7   Sept. 16 - Nov. 17
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #43 on: April 12, 2017, 08:50:46 AM »
Thanks.

We just open up on 4/8 and go to 5/22. 
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #44 on: April 12, 2017, 09:19:31 AM »
Looks like  about 2 week earlier than ours...
I have hunted in the snow...mid April...Looking foir the pic'''LOL

Anyway view for my umbrella blind....decoy in field, about 25 yds out.... right side about even with the right umbrella support sticking up

Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #45 on: April 12, 2017, 09:22:11 AM »
I have had a few hunts in the snow as well.  Some here and some in Colorado.  Where I hunt is very similar to your picture (which seems like I have seen before). 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #46 on: April 12, 2017, 09:39:05 AM »
I think we have posted area pic's...LOL
Found the snow pic...form same spot different year.....
I like that spot if you haven't noticed.....

Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #47 on: April 21, 2017, 03:38:21 PM »
Well the trade rifle got blooded today.  I was out in the morning.  Too wet to spray weeds and we branded calves yesterday so time for the Turkey.  About two hours into sitting watching a meadow surrounded by wooded areas I heard a gobble.  Long ways off, maybe 600 yards.  Sounded like it was on the far side of a big alfalfa field north of my setup.  The bird was moving, gobbled four or five times and I started throwing some loud yelps at him.  He responded really well and came across fairly quickly to the north end of the woods.  He started moving to my right in a circle and was coming closer.  I could not see him but the gobbles were getting really loud.  His last gobble was within about sixty yards and I was surprised I couldn't see him yet.  For some reason, don't know why, sneaked a glance over to my right.  About thirty yards and a bit behind me was a big tom, in display, and as pretty in bright red and blue as could be.  He was on the far side of an empty irrigation ditch and moving to my right.  I waited till he went behind a tree, rolled over on my stomach, and brought the trade rifle up and cocked.  He came out from behind the tree and at the shot dropped.  He lay still for a time then made a couple of wing flaps and expired.  An ecstatic me went and picked him up. 

The turkey was a decent sized bird, good beard, still fat, and his wing tips were not worn much.  Probably the bird doing all the gobbling was the boss and this one was just trying to sneak in before he showed up. 

The load was 70 grains of 2F black powder, a over powder card, a fiber wad, 1 1/8" oz prox of No. 5 shot, and an over shot thin card. This was a first for me with a muzzle loading smooth bore flinter and it won't (I hope) be the last.



 
 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline hunter63

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #48 on: April 21, 2017, 05:55:41 PM »
Outstanding ..nice bird.
Them there old fashioned guns work just fine....
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline imnukensc

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Re: Getting ready for Turkey season with a flintlock.
« Reply #49 on: April 21, 2017, 06:20:31 PM »
Congrats, Stan!  Nice bird and taking it with that flintlock had to be extremely gratifying!
The universe is made up of protons, neutrons, electrons, and morons.