Author Topic: farmer question  (Read 309 times)

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Offline hayshaker

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farmer question
« on: April 06, 2017, 03:06:24 PM »
 where i live when you buy a tractor the question is
red or green meaning jhondeere or case.
so here is my question     being that people are
very attached to the implements they own.
what if i were to make a line of knives.
in green/yellow and red/black.
so what say you?

Offline wsdstan

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2017, 05:31:59 PM »
You better match the color exactly.   

I have read that John Deere is pretty aggressive in defense of unlicensed use of their name on products so if you use their name on the knife and sell a bunch of them they will likely come after you.  Don't know about Case.
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Offline pete28

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2017, 05:37:28 PM »
Not a farmer but second stans assessment. We just had an antique tractor and engine show this weekend at my park and the John Deere stuff for sale was watched like a hawk! As for case I don't believe that is a trademark red where as John Deere green is so to speak
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Online imnukensc

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2017, 05:59:31 PM »
I would never buy a knife simply because the handle matched the color of my tractor.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2017, 06:06:21 PM »
IH or Case-IH, as they are now called, also has a specific shade or color of RED that they use.  Sometimes guys re-paint older tractors with 'aftermarket' red paint to save a few frogskins rather than using the factory paint, but it ain't the same......you can spot 'em a mile away! :puke:
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2017, 06:33:19 PM »
I would never buy a knife simply because the handle matched the color of my tractor.

 :hail:  Yep.  Me either.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2017, 07:09:06 PM »
Nor I.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2017, 07:16:38 PM »
I wouldn't either, but then I always wondered why all those tactical, orange-handled Allis-Chalmers knives seem so popular with everyone these days, too? :shrug:
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Offline hayshaker

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2017, 07:20:39 PM »
well given that monsanto owns dekalb there goes the ball cap color
knive scale idea as well. the chiselers

Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2017, 07:30:28 PM »
At the risk of starting yet another international crisis, I imagine Belarus and Mahindra colors are out of the question, too. :shrug:
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Offline hayshaker

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2017, 07:51:59 PM »
wolfy that's ok i no longer own a 50'000 dollar duck cloth jacket with the DEKALB
logo to go with my ball cap.

Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2017, 07:58:46 PM »
Yeah, them fancy embroidered winged-ear corn-patches come mighty dear these days.....and I thought Filson stuff was pricey! :doh:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2017, 05:54:47 AM »
  In my opinion outdoorsmen already have a vast number of decorator knives to choose from on the market today, from Mora knives to Hultafors to Bear Gyrills to the Survivor Man series and more,  colors range from Neon to subdued,  red, green, orange, black, brown, OD, to Zombie blood, and more,  some are decent performers, some are pure junk, some cheap,  some pretty expensive.
  If you want to think out of the box today,  try offering a nice blade out of 1095 or 01 that cuts well and wears a comfortable set of plain wood or micarta scales for a price that even a common man can afford,  now that would be novel idea I think,  hell, if Old Hickory can do it for $12.00,  why can't a skilled knife maker do it for $50.00 ?
  I'll bet if Condor used 1095 for their blades and upped quality control while keeping their retail prices between $35.00 and $70.00 they would corner the market in outdoor knives.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2017, 08:50:52 AM »
HEAR, HEAR! :cheers:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2017, 09:52:06 AM »
I prefer 02 tool steel to 1095 and want stag handles.  Not interested in having a knife everybody else has.  Look for form, function, and quality. 

The knife maker has to eat, has children to raise, and needs shelter.  $50 won't cut it.  Let Condor use cheap labor and better QC and see what they come up with, but I still will prefer something made by the local knifemaker.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2017, 10:52:32 AM »
Personally, what I would truly like to see are the common everyday knives of yesteryear reproduced.  I don't mean CLOSE to the original model reproductions, but EXACT reproductions.  There's really no good reason for that condition to exist that I can see.....all the makers would need to do is obtain an original, measure it carefully and build them to exactly match those measurements. 

The subtleties of the originals are lost in all of today's factory reproductions and there is no reason for that condition to persist, as far as I can see.  Condor's Kephart, for example comes 'close,' but is not true to the original design.  The simple original Nessmuk design is another example that seems lost in the translation by almost all of today's makers.....almost every one of them seems to greatly exaggerate that famous 'hump' and why, I have no idea. 

Some time back, we had a pretty exhaustive discussion on what is known by most of us today as the 'Dadly' design; a simple, common and widely used knife in the days of the Indian trade and mountain man era.  The Russell Green River reproduction commonly available today, only slightly replicates the original, but why?   The repro has 'jimping' on the spine, while the original did not, so why do they insist on adding that feature to today's offering?  The originals had simple smooth or checkered walnut, hickory or ebony slab handles that were pinned to the distally-tapered blade with 5 iron pins, so why doesn't SOMEONE pick up that ball and run with it?  Certainly it would be more expensive to build them that way, but I am certain that MANY of us would be willing to come up with the extra frogskins it would take to own an EXACT reproduction of the original design without having to resort to the even greater expense of employing a custom knifemaker to build one.  :shrug:

There floats my stick....Waugh! :chopwood:
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2017, 10:59:26 AM »
  if Old Hickory can do it for $12.00,  why can't a skilled knife maker do it for $50.00 ?
 

Because most knife makers don't have machinery that produces 10,000 blanks per day and other machines that grind 10,000 blades a day with only two people .

Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2017, 11:22:24 AM »
  if Old Hickory can do it for $12.00,  why can't a skilled knife maker do it for $50.00 ?
 

Because most knife makers don't have machinery that produces 10,000 blanks per day and other machines that grind 10,000 blades a day with only two people .
Understood, and my point exactly!  :thumbsup:    As long as the knife company is going to the trouble of setting up those machines and grinding those 10,000 blades, why don't they set them up to grind them correctly to match an original?   With today's CNC equipment and it's capabilities, there is no valid reason we can't have easy access to historically significant blade designs that are indistinguishable in a side by side comparison with museum pieces.  :coffee:

EDIT:  SORRY, hayshaker!  What this has to do with tractor-colored knife handles is beyond me, and once again.....we digress! :-[     This time, of course.....it was Moe's fault! :taunt:
« Last Edit: April 24, 2017, 11:56:03 AM by wolfy »
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Offline greyhound352

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2017, 07:04:58 PM »
What make is this old steam tractor? I would like a knife as cool or hot as it.

Here, a modern 850 horse power John Deere plays tug-of-war with a 1800's tractor rated at only 18 horse power.

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Offline wolfy

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2017, 08:44:27 PM »
I can't tell, but it's not a CASE.....they've got an eagle motif on the front.  Those old steamer boys certainly gave that hot rod John Deere whippersnapper the what for, though! :lol:   
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: farmer question
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2017, 09:25:03 AM »
I prefer 02 tool steel to 1095 and want stag handles.  Not interested in having a knife everybody else has.  Look for form, function, and quality. 

The knife maker has to eat, has children to raise, and needs shelter.  $50 won't cut it.  Let Condor use cheap labor and better QC and see what they come up with, but I still will prefer something made by the local knifemaker.

  I couldn't agree with you more about a craftsman's needs to feed his family and should be paid well not only for his work, but also for his learned skills,  and like you I really appreciate custom made and semi custom made knives,  I have some of both, customs by MML, Turley, Adventure Sworn, Jeff White, MP, and a few from lesser known local makers, each chosen because they were unique in some way,  and all have been great knives for me.
  I also have a couple of semi customs from Bark River and Blind Horse, that I enjoy very much,  but all of them with the exception of my ENZO Trapper and Jeff White knife ($125.00)  retail for $200.00 or more,  and I'm sure that some of my Vintage fixed blades by Western Cutlery and Camillus would go for much more today than I paid for them 50 years ago,  but I also have some inexpensive outdoors knives that are pretty inexpensive even when compared to the lower end knives being sold by Buck, Gerber, and other.
  A couple of examples are Condor made knives,   Kephart model and a Woodlaw model,  the Kephart is not a true heavy duty bushcraft knife though I'm sure Kephart himself would have been disappointed with Condors version for his needs and what he used his belt knife for, and at under $30.00 that I paid for it it's been a good all around light duty camp and food prep knife,  and it's pretty good at processing small game and fish.
 My Woodlaw is a modified scandi and excels at processing wood,  notches, feather sticks, light batoning for kindling, cutting cordage,  and carving projects like spoons,  the Woodlaw I think you'd like,  the finished blade was $18.00 from Amazon, the brown micarta scale material, the white and green spacers and custom pins for the knife and matching ferro rod were about $20.00,  if it weren't for the Condor name on the blade it could be mistaken for a Sargent 3-M custom knife.
My point was,  if a craftsman is going to bother making a knife that will be competing in the market with other cheap and ugly looking neon colored knives,  why not just offer a better quality blade with traditional styling,  I meet other hikers and campers in my travels and at the several meets I attend every year and except for the few Mora Clippers and bushcraft blacks I see, I can't remember ever seeing (except for one guy carrying a BG Survival knife) anyone wearing a brightly colored knife.
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