Blades and Bushlore

General Discussion => Food and Cooking => Topic started by: Moe M. on May 18, 2012, 08:43:14 AM

Title: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 18, 2012, 08:43:14 AM

  I was going to put this into the Just Recipes section as that seems to be stalled a little,  but on second thought most to the recipes in that section center around cooking on the BBQ grill,  smoking,  or in the home kitchen.
 What I'd like to discuss here are the meals that we prepare on the trail or in camp,  while we all use quicky prepared foods like Ramen Noddles,  Mountain House dried meals,  MRE's and the like,  I'd like to hear about the more inventive ways in which some of us cook healthy good tasting meals over a camp fire with backpacking cookware,  hobo pots or small mess kits.
 To get it started,  one of my favorites is beef stew,  since I usually cook for just myself (usually the friends that I camp with bring their own,  we might mix and match or share some stuff,  but generally cook for ourselves) taking along some fresh veggies and a frozen piece of beef or small bag of stew meat isn't much of a problem,  add a couple of cups of water and some granulated boullion,  a little salt and pepper in a small pot or canteen cup and your on your way to a good meal.
 Another favorite is campfire beans,  I use my mom's recipe for baked beans for the cooking liquid,  molasses, yellow mustard, brown sugar,  salt & pepper,  and put it in a medium canning jar,  in camp I soak the beans overnight,  the next morning I rinse them,  then cook up some bacon and use the drippings as a base for the beans,  I put the beans in a small pot with the bacon drippings,  add the flavoring liquid,  top off with water to cover the beans,  I bring it to a boil then move it just far enough from direct heat to get a slow simmer when covered.
 I let them slow simmer for four or five hours checking the water level once in a while,  when the beans are tender I take the cover off the pot,  as the liquid reduces the beans thicken up a bit,  the finished beans are almost as good as oven baked overnight. 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on May 18, 2012, 09:18:22 AM

We try all sorts of things, but prefer to grill food "skewer"/ "kabob" style. Many times we will cut up some venison/beef at home & bring it along with an onion & a green pepper or two. Or sometimes just bring a package of frozen venison/meat we have, & cut it as it thaws. Potatoes are a common addition too. We have also par-boiled some chicken at home & then freeze it & bring that to "finish" on the fire. Of course we also try to camp near fishing spots, ( which n Minn. is rather easy) so fresh fish for any meal is common. Fried in a pan, wrapped in green leaves/watercress or foil, or 'Planked/stick grilled ( can't remember the name of the method right now as it escapes me,but your put sticks thru the fish, binding it to a main "handle" stick.) Sometimes we dig a hole into a river bank, build a fire to coals, then put a light layer of dirt on coals & then wet watercress/grn leaves on the covered coals Then the cleaned fish, many times stuffed with wild leeks or even wintergreen or edibles like that, then more wet stuff, then cover with dirt & wait & fish some more. Then uncover later on & eat the cooked fish.. Good stuff.
 ;)
Many times early in our trips, when we still have bacon, eggs & sometimes cheese, we sometimes make "Omelets n a sack" for breakfast. We place 2 pieces of bacon into a paper bag, laid on the bottom, & add an egg on top of the bacon, & sometimes we add cheese or, our favorite ingredients, then fold sack down to close it, in about 1 inch folds, then skewer the folded part with a sharp stick. Hover over the coals (not fire/flames) for about 5-10 minutes & then eat the results. ( try it if ya haven't done it, it works. If ya don't let the sack too close to the coals)
 ;)
Bacon-cheese dogs are good too. Ya take a wiener slice it length wise not quite all the way thru & then stick lil pieces of cheese in the cut & then close. Wrap & bind with bacon spiraling around the wiener from one end to the other to hold in the cheese, & place lil whittled toothpick in thru the endsto hold the bacon on the wiener. Then skewer on a sharp stick & cook over flames or coals...
 :)


I have a lot more like the ones I wrote about, but I better wait & let some others post too.
If.. ya want more ideas of things "I/we" do for eating out in the sticks.
 :)
 I do not want to spoil others input, & ramble on....
I will say that we eat pretty good when we are out. & a lot of this stuff we do, is light & easy to carry in, rather than hauling a lot of cookware & gear. We try to use what is available "out there" that Nature provides ( & practice skills),more than depend on lots of stuff, unless we are truck/car camping, then worrying about toting things on our body, isn't any worry. Got some recipes/ideas for that type of camping too. As I said.. I don't want to spoil this for others.
 ;)
Great topic Moe! Thnx!
 :thumbsup:


 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 18, 2012, 10:03:42 AM

 Great post,  just what I was hoping for,  thank you.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: OutdoorEnvy on May 18, 2012, 12:12:00 PM
To share a few of my favorites:

bacon and eggs in a cast iron skillet

fried fish and hush puppies in a cast iron skillet

venison tenderloin (or venison steaks) and a baked potato.  The venison I like to sear on a log that's been burning for awhile and the potato you can wrap in foil and just put on the edge of the fire for 1-2 hours or so. 

All these are MUY BUENO at camp   :stir:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: werewolf won on May 18, 2012, 12:37:55 PM
I've rolled more stuff in tin foil and tossed it in the coals than I can remember.  A pretty common item is fruit (apple, pear or peach) cored and stuffed with raisins brown sugar and cinnamon.  Great treat.

Wolf
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on May 19, 2012, 09:03:56 PM
I bought a small mess kit from Walmart.  I'd love to see some pictures or ideas on what to use with that tiny set.    I have this feeling foods are going to stick quite badly.

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Forest Turtle on May 20, 2012, 02:53:42 AM
Not peeled potatoes baked in hot ash. I'm used to pull them out before they are cooked, make a hole in each and fill it with raw egg. Then I put them for a moment back into hot ash. Seasoned just with salt and pepper. It's tasty and filling meal. Remains of mass, hollowed out from potatoes can be used into stew or soup. 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 20, 2012, 04:34:41 PM
I bought a small mess kit from Walmart.  I'd love to see some pictures or ideas on what to use with that tiny set.    I have this feeling foods are going to stick quite badly.

WW.

  It depends on which mess kit you bought,  the hard annodized set they sell for about $25.00 is pretty good from what I've heard,  the thin aluminum "boy scout" type kits from Coleman and a few other brands that sell for anywhere between $5.00 and $10.00 dollars are sure to burn food and be hell to clean.
  Personally I'd suggest using Stainless Steel,  preferably the same or better quality as the USGI mess kit,  usually one can find good quality small used cookware at thrift shops that nest,  are easy to pack,  and priced cheap.
  Also if you can find a 5~6 inch cast iron skillet they are great for personal trail cooking,  combined with a small covered pot they make a fine minimalist kit.

  Last tip,  cook over low to moderate heat,  never on high heat unless you're just boiling water.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on May 20, 2012, 07:46:01 PM
aack... I bought the 'cheap' one.    I've been shopping and shopping ...trying to find a good set.   I definately want a frypan that goes with it.   It seems its either all pots.. or just a fry pan for an average priced set.

I've seen that oval set (mess kit) , that one makes sense to me.

Ok guys. pop in some pictures.. we wanna see some grub cookin!    :)   

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Forest Turtle on May 21, 2012, 01:35:13 AM
Woods Woman, don't be disappointed, I have aluminium mess kit for long years and for cooking (can't say for frying too) it's good. I don't say "best," but it works well.

(http://www.csla-borotin.estranky.cz/img/mid/27/esus.jpg)
(illustration)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 21, 2012, 03:46:38 PM
Woods Woman, don't be disappointed, I have aluminium mess kit for long years and for cooking (can't say for frying too) it's good. I don't say "best," but it works well.

(http://www.csla-borotin.estranky.cz/img/mid/27/esus.jpg)
(illustration)

  I prefer Stainless over Aluminum because Stainless is nonreactive,  but there's a difference in quality when comparing cookware,  your set for example looks like it's made of thicker material than the cheapy Walmart Chinese Boy Scout type kit,  and most likely cooks very well,  trying to fry eggs, bacon, sear a steak, or pan fry fish in something in the thickness range of a beer can ain't going to get it done.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Forest Turtle on May 21, 2012, 04:22:09 PM

I prefer Stainless over Aluminum because Stainless is nonreactive,  but there's a difference in quality when comparing cookware,  your set for example looks like it's made of thicker material than the cheap Walmart Chinese Boy Scout type kit,  and most likely cooks very well,  trying to fry eggs, bacon, sear a steak, or pan fry fish in something in the thickness range of a beer can ain't going to get it done.

Thanx for explanation, Moe M. I had never thinking about like this. And maybe there are differences between stainless kits too, because mine experiences were horrible. Food burned quicker than in aluminium kit. Aluminium is heated uniformly, not like stainless. But ordinary I don't sear steaks or fry fish on trails so you'll be right anyway.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on May 21, 2012, 06:02:02 PM
Cooking using natural materials is less likely to burn any food, Unless ya aren't payin' attention, & when ya are done there is nothing to clean... Ya just burn yur stuff ya used to cook that Ma Nature provided, & make more "cookware/utensils, later, if ya need it..
 ;)



  What I'd like to discuss here are the meals that we prepare on the trail or in camp,  while we all use quicky prepared foods like Ramen Noddles,  Mountain House dried meals,  MRE's and the like,  I'd like to hear about the more inventive ways in which some of us cook healthy good tasting meals over a camp fire with backpacking cookware,  hobo pots or small mess kits.
 


The merits of different cookware & how it is used , I thought was a different topic.. Forgive me if I am wrong.
 :)


I like to have a Peanut butter & Jelly sandwich on Toasted bread before I go out to fish in the morning. It goes good with me coffee, tea or hot chocolate.. Only problem is that I don't want to make them in the morning...
So I make them over the fire the night before , If... not in bear country.
I use what they call a "Pie-iron"... I'll try to find a pic, or go take one of ours later. One of ours is square, & the other is round. They work good with pie fllings & even have beeen used for omelets & Beef stew... They are great to have if you are not packing them. Otherwise, ya have to use another, non - cookware/utensil method like "ash cake" or "bannock" style.
 :)
Anyone know what I am talking about... & have some other recipes?
 ;)

Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on May 21, 2012, 06:45:31 PM
I know what your jabberin' about, MnS.......those little hinged 2-piece sandwich toasters that look like a pair of aluminum clay pigeons w/ long handles, right?    Ours are some my Dad passed down to me and he used to use them over the gas range burner flame to make a quick jelly-filled treat on a cold evening.  I've even seen cast iron versions, round ones and square ones, lined with Teflon (ours are unlined), and even one that had tube shaped interiors that would 3 tube-steaks at a time.  I have even seen a website devoted to recipes for them.......some of them pretty exotic and involved :)

I was wondering about the square ones.......do they seal the edges of the sandwich as well as the round ones?  I always felt it was a bit wasteful to have to trim away the excess bread sticking out past the edges of the round version, but it does seal the sandwich or pie filling inside the toasted bread very well 8) :fire2:


P.S.     Here's one...... http://www.pieiron.com/recipes.htm
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on May 21, 2012, 06:58:49 PM
I know what your jabberin' about, MnS.......those little hinged 2-piece sandwich toasters that look like a pair of aluminum clay pigeons w/ long handles, right?    Ours are some my Dad passed down to me and he used to use them over the gas range burner flame to make a quick jelly-filled treat on a cold evening.  I've even seen cast iron versions, round ones and square ones, lined with Teflon (ours are unlined), and even one that had tube shaped interiors that would 3 tube-steaks at a time.  I have even seen a website devoted to recipes for them.......some of them pretty exotic and involved :)

I was wondering about the square ones.......do they seal the edges of the sandwich as well as the round ones?  I always felt it was a bit wasteful to have to trim away the excess bread sticking out past the edges of the round version, but it does seal the sandwich or pie filling inside the toasted bread very well 8) :fire2:


P.S.     Here's one...... http://www.pieiron.com/recipes.htm (http://www.pieiron.com/recipes.htm)


Ours are "un-lined" & yes you are describing exactly what I was talkin about. Yes the square ones work fine.. Actually, less waste if ya buy the square bread loaves. That link is about the same things. I am gonna try & take some pics.. Kids are fond of them. I luv em when we use em.


 :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on May 21, 2012, 10:10:13 PM
I have a pie iron!!  :)      I have this recipe of two cake mixes mixed and you just use a 1/3 cup with 3 Tbs. water to nuke in a bowl for a quick cake.   I've played with that idea to make brownies in the pie iron...  mmm.. nummy.

Apple pie is still the fave here tho.


WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 22, 2012, 09:23:02 AM

I prefer Stainless over Aluminum because Stainless is nonreactive,  but there's a difference in quality when comparing cookware,  your set for example looks like it's made of thicker material than the cheap Walmart Chinese Boy Scout type kit,  and most likely cooks very well,  trying to fry eggs, bacon, sear a steak, or pan fry fish in something in the thickness range of a beer can ain't going to get it done.

 


Thanx for explanation, Moe M. I had never thinking about like this. And maybe there are differences between stainless kits too, because mine experiences were horrible. Food burned quicker than in aluminium kit. Aluminium is heated uniformly, not like stainless. But ordinary I don't sear steaks or fry fish on trails so you'll be right anyway.

  Actually we are both right,  if you were to take a peek into the kitchen area of your favorite eatery you'd find thick aluminum and stainless steel cookware being used by those masters that prepare your favorite dishes,  you would also find very few of them that have burned food in them.
  The why is that they are quality cookware,  the aluminum is thick and conducts heat evenly,  the same for stainless, it has to be a minimum if 18/10 stainless to conduct heat for the proper preperation of food without burning it.
  That said,  eveything depends on the heat used under the pan or pot,  too much heat will burn food and have it sticking to the best of cookware,  I have a couple of friends who have GI mess kits just like mine,  they are always caked with burned bits on the bottoms,  and the guys are always complaining that they're junk only fit for burning good food,  I don't have that problem with mine,  I think they are the best designed and highest quality cook kits you can find.
  The difference between mine and there's is that it's mine,  I don't cook over flames,  I don't cook right on top of coals,  I don't cook over heat that's high enough to burn the oils that i'm cooking in. be it butter, bacon grease,  or olive oil,  once you burn the oils the food is next to burn and stick to the cookware,  it's that simple.

  I've cooked steak over a campfire using aluminum foil for a pan and it turned out great,  but given a choice I'd much rather have a cast iron grill skillet,  but much of the time I use my GI mess kit because it's a good compromise,  and it works.

  Control the heat and the food will cook itself quite well.

  I cook with a frying pan or skillet at least as often as I do on the grill top or in a pot,  that's one of the reasons I'm drawn to the GI mess kit,  throw in the canteen cup and cover and the cup stove and it's a perfect set,  for my needs anyway.
  I've seen other sets that are nice and of high quality,  I like the little nesting set that Walmart carries,  it a series of nesting pots with covers that are made of hard annodised aluminum,  but I'd be lost with a set like that,  who can survive with only cups and pots,  and no skillet,  surely not me.   :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on May 22, 2012, 09:36:42 AM


  Control the heat and the food will cook itself quite well. < That's the key as far as I am concerned

 
  I've seen other sets that are nice and of high quality,  I like the little nesting set that Walmart carries,  it a series of nesting pots with covers that are made of hard annodised aluminum,  but I'd be lost with a set like that,  who can survive with only cups and pots,  and no skillet,  surely not me.   :)   I can, but I surely like to have a skillet if I can.. But I use nature(green sticks)  for making grills & skewers alot though.. LOL :)


Really great topic Moe M.!
I like it a lot!
 :D
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 22, 2012, 10:55:36 AM


  Control the heat and the food will cook itself quite well. < That's the key as far as I am concerned

 
  I've seen other sets that are nice and of high quality,  I like the little nesting set that Walmart carries,  it a series of nesting pots with covers that are made of hard annodised aluminum,  but I'd be lost with a set like that,  who can survive with only cups and pots,  and no skillet,  surely not me.   :)   I can, but I surely like to have a skillet if I can.. But I use nature(green sticks)  for making grills & skewers alot though.. LOL :)


Really great topic Moe M.!
I like it a lot!
 :D

  Thanks,  I think it's interesting,  but I'm biased  :).

  It's also interesting to me what we as individuals get out of our outdoor experiences,  for some folks the views are the high,  for others it's the solitude,  some of us just love to sit by a fire a carve kurska's, spoons, and wood spirits.
  I enjoy the overall experience as much as anyone else,  but a big part of my camping pleasures come from a well designed fire and some good grub (not to be confused with Mad Max's wood grubs).
 Like you,  I enjoy roasting on a stick,  baking on a flat stone,  or broiling a nicely seasoned fish on a cedar plank,  but I also get a kick out of using small skillets and pots converted to campfire cooking to see how well they work.
 I been pleasantly surprised at just how well these mostly discarded pieces have performed over the expensive high tech wonder ware that is being marketed to backpackers and campers today.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Forest Turtle on May 22, 2012, 11:25:18 AM
Skillet.. I don't have any. Me and my friends have on trails a "Silesia pan," replica of cookware that was used by ancient Slave nation which used to live in Central Europe. It can be used instead plate on top of the primitive oven or as a frying pan. Handle is usually carved on campsite. We have never burn food on it yet... basting every meal is worth needed. Bread cake baking (or bannock)is possible too.

(http://nd05.jxs.cz/259/541/f55831173e_85822558_u.jpg)
(http://nd05.jxs.cz/998/160/e59bd9b845_85822657_u.jpg)
(http://nd05.jxs.cz/506/299/7cbd4c3ef7_79273055_o2.jpg)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on May 22, 2012, 01:54:28 PM
Forest Turtle...     OH I want one of those!!  :)     I've been wanting what they call here a discus, wich is very simular but heavier than the one you show  by the looks of it.     

Umm...is that anchovies in with the eggs?   

And kidneys being fried up? 

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Forest Turtle on May 22, 2012, 02:16:20 PM
WW: Silesian pan is great piece of kit, if cooking for all trip company is needed. (http://emoticoner.com/files/emoticons/smileys/eating1-smiley.gif?1292867587)

It is bacon with eggs for breakfast.. yummy! And chicken being fried up in bear sauce and chilli I believe. :-)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on May 22, 2012, 04:55:17 PM
Moe  M. ,



  Thanks,  I think it's interesting,  but I'm biased  :) .

  It's also interesting to me what we as individuals get out of our outdoor experiences,  for some folks the views are the high,  for others it's the solitude,  some of us just love to sit by a fire a carve kurska's, spoons, and wood spirits.

I agree, very interesting.. :)

  I enjoy the overall experience as much as anyone else,  but a big part of my camping pleasures come from a well designed fire and some good grub (not to be confused with Mad Max's wood grubs).


I can understand... we'll all give & take due to what we enjoy!
:)

 Like you,  I enjoy roasting on a stick,  baking on a flat stone,  or broiling a nicely seasoned fish on a cedar plank,  but I also get a kick out of using small skillets and pots converted to campfire cooking to see how well they work.


Over time... I reckon I will also. But at this time, I just enjoy using many of the thing Ma Nature provides, with a lil modification from "us". :D

 I been pleasantly surprised at just how well these mostly discarded pieces have performed over the expensive high tech wonder ware that is being marketed to backpackers and campers today.



 IMHO...I am "All for" using older "techniques/technologies"before moving on to the newer ones. 2 reasons... One is to be able to do things, without the new ones, first...("Walk" before "Run" thinking) & 2, is to be able to pass on the old things before they are forgotten because of the new stuff. I think ya know where I am goin with how I think..
:)


We agree Moe M., on much of what we aresein here in this topic.. I hope it continues.. Much good info gettng passed here!
 :thumbsup:
-----------------------------------------

Forest Turtle,
  That looks like a great "skillet"/ Piece of kit to carry. I am not sure ya would be familiar with what example I use here, but it reminds me of a "miners' pan", like they use to pan for gold in streams.
 :)


There ya go... more than one use.
 ;)


Thanx for showing me/us your "skillet"/Silesian pan, It is good thing to remember.
 :thumbsup:



Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 23, 2012, 07:43:31 AM
Forest Turtle...     OH I want one of those!!  :)     I've been wanting what they call here a discus, wich is very simular but heavier than the one you show  by the looks of it.     

Umm...is that anchovies in with the eggs?   

And kidneys being fried up? 

WW.

  It's interesting how different people in different parts of the world adapt tools and other impliments needed in their every day lives that are so similar,  yet have likely never seen those of others.
 The pan in those pic's from Forrest Turtle is common to central Europe as she states,  yet it is very similar to the Paloli pans found in many Spanish and South American homes,  and it also resembles the shallow Woks found in much of Asian cooking.
 I reminds me a lot of a pan that drew my attention a while back when the game show 'Survival' first aired,  the contestants were given a fixed blade survival knife,  a pan similar to that of Forrest Turtle's, and a bag of rice to be used as rations to get them started in their new invironment.
 I thought at the time that it was pretty functional,  because of it's design it could be used to stir fry,  boil rice,  make soups and stews,  and it also could be used to make breads,  turned over it could be used as a make shift oven.
 I found that a pan of that design can be found in many Asian and Hispanic ethnic grocery and convienience stores for pretty cheap money,  most are nothing more than hand hamered forged sheet steel,  and that once seasoned,  cook almost as good as cast iron,  but at 1/4 the weight of cast iron.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on May 23, 2012, 08:14:43 AM
I find them interesting too  Moe..    the way this one Forest Turtle is more shallow than my WOK I can see it being more 'packable'.   

My guess is that FT's pan was used for many thing other than just cooking.    Winnowing for one.   Mixing bread dough in.   Its shallow enough that yes.. like you said.. upside down its got uses too.     I've seen tortilla like breads lain on upside down woks to cook... 

I'd like to find one like Ft's ..    Or make one.  Any idea on how to go about that?  I have sheet metal here and could get more if I  need it.   

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Frugal Bohemian on May 23, 2012, 08:58:21 AM
I'd like to find one like Ft's ..    Or make one.  Any idea on how to go about that?  I have sheet metal here and could get more if I  need it.   

WW.

this instructional video might help (although it seems to be in German, it also uses another universal language)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKkAN63L6YE

If that doesn't look like enough fun, here's what I'd do.  I'd toss that sheet metal in a hot campfire and get it super hot.  While it's heating up, I'd find a large, smooth-ish rock to use as a sort of anvil or die.  Then I'd take the hot sheet metal, lay in on the rock, and pound the crap out of it with a mini sledge.  Move it over the rock in a circular sort of motion while you're pounding the crap out of it and forming it into a shallow wok-like shape.  My infomercial-bought wok (ca. 1993) has small hammer marks all over it, so I'll assume that's not an unreasonable finish.

After about an hour of heating and hammering, you'll probably be good to go.  Use an angle grinder to grind the edge into a circular shape.  Rectangle could work too I suppose.  Then I'd have to think there's some sort of heat treatment or tempering or something to be done.  That'll be the easy part though.  Then just season it like a regular wok.

This is all off the top of my head, with only a shade-tree tinkerer's knowledge of metalworking so take it with a grain of salt!  It's something I might try sometime though.  All I'd be out is a couple square feet of sheet metal and an afternoon in front of the fire with a hammer and a rock.

Sounds like an afternoon well spent, actually.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 23, 2012, 11:34:13 AM
I find them interesting too  Moe..    the way this one Forest Turtle is more shallow than my WOK I can see it being more 'packable'.   

My guess is that FT's pan was used for many thing other than just cooking.    Winnowing for one.   Mixing bread dough in.   Its shallow enough that yes.. like you said.. upside down its got uses too.     I've seen tortilla like breads lain on upside down woks to cook... 

I'd like to find one like Ft's ..    Or make one.  Any idea on how to go about that?  I have sheet metal here and could get more if I  need it.   

WW.

  Off the top of my head WW I'd be thinking more about doing a search on the net to find a shallow Wok or Paolie pan,  if I couldn't find one,  my next step would be to get a steel Wok and cut it around the sides to the depth that I wanted then file or sand the cut edge smooth.
  One could do it pretty quickly with a cut off saw,  large metel snips or a good hack saw would take a bit longer but would still get it done
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Forest Turtle on May 23, 2012, 12:36:43 PM
Our ancestors were smart, so they made only versatile tools with many ways to use. At that time it was needed because Slavic tribes were nomadic until 6th century.

Silesian pan is about 30 cm in diameter and we usually cook in it meal for six people or so. For one person is too large and too heavy (it's about 4 millimetres thick). Besides cooking and frying it's good for digging holes for campfire or cooling hole for food (we usually travel on foot, no car fridge is near :-D). Pan can float - there isn't anything better as floating Silesian pan full of cheese and vegetables while you are enjoying cool water in hot day. ;)
And I'm sure there are many other ways to use.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Half Axe on May 24, 2012, 10:25:18 PM
FT, you say the Silesian is 30 cm across and made of 4mm thick metal.  How deep is it?  That is the only other dimension needed to duplicate it, either by manufacturing one or finding a pan that is either the same dimensions or could be modified.  Thanks for sharing the pan and a little history with us!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Forest Turtle on May 25, 2012, 01:34:21 AM
OK, I measured one I have just at home. 30 cm in diameter, 2 mm thick, 3,5 cm deep. I was wrong, not 4 mm but 2 mm thick.  :-X
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Half Axe on May 25, 2012, 06:54:52 PM
Thanks, FT, for taking measurements off yours to share with everyone  :).
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Half Axe on May 25, 2012, 09:27:45 PM
Getting back to the topic.........

I have one of those oval-shaped GI mess kits.  I catch and fillet a mess of brook trout from a wilderness lake.  Use the oval-shaped frying pan from the mess kit to cook them over a camp fire in unsalted butter.  Use Old Bay to season to taste.  Never gets old.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on May 26, 2012, 05:41:40 AM
cook them over a camp fire in unsalted butter.  Use Old Bay to season to taste.  Never gets old.
+1 good  stuff.
Making me hungry. Just got ta go troutfishing.Very soon...
:)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: easy_rider75 on May 26, 2012, 09:37:22 AM
I've rolled more stuff in tin foil and tossed it in the coals than I can remember.  A pretty common item is fruit (apple, pear or peach) cored and stuffed with raisins brown sugar and cinnamon.  Great treat.

Wolf

yep same here  done that a few times at home to.  Used to cook that way when  the power went out in the wood  stove  at home
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 05, 2012, 07:53:33 PM
....
 I thought at the time that it was pretty functional,  because of it's design it could be used to stir fry,  boil rice,  make soups and stews,  and it also could be used to make breads,  turned over it could be used as a make shift oven.
 I found that a pan of that design can be found in many Asian and Hispanic ethnic grocery and convienience stores for pretty cheap money,  most are nothing more than hand hamered forged sheet steel,  and that once seasoned,  cook almost as good as cast iron,  but at 1/4 the weight of cast iron.
And that is why a wok has replaced most of my cast iron for camp use, unless car camping.
The "wok" is pretty much a generic name. I found a restaurant supply house that had every conceivable wok size, from 30" to 8". I have a 12" and an 8" packed away in the gear. They can do everything a cast iron "spider" can do, and 4x more...including double as a wash basin!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 05, 2012, 09:27:43 PM
OP..  will you be heading back to that store again soon?   I'm interested in a smaller wok if you can get price quotes for me.  :)

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 05, 2012, 10:07:34 PM
OP..  will you be heading back to that store again soon?   I'm interested in a smaller wok if you can get price quotes for me.  :)

WW.
The store is many miles and years away. These products are readily available through Oriental cooking supply houses. I don't have any links to offer right now, though.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 06, 2012, 05:23:53 AM
Ok , Thanks OP.  :)   

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on June 06, 2012, 06:41:49 AM
Might I suggest a replacement for the wok? In a pinch, a SS dog dish works as a pan.... &/or a wash basin. ;)


I have a couple,  use them for cooking sometimes & for Duke too. Family Dollar/Dollar tree, Pamida, & such should have them & they are usually around $2. pllus or minus.
 :)


Just thought I would mention it.
 :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 06, 2012, 09:46:43 AM
Hey now.. I like that idea!   I'll go looking for dog food bowls and maybe even those stainless steel mixing bowls.     Thanks for the idea!  :)

Back on topic:

I've got plans to try doing some shishkabobs on the Sixfooter stove I have for supper tonight.  :)   Beef,onion,mushroom, and green peppers I think.      The Kabob should lay across nicely in those V cuts.  :)

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Angerland on June 08, 2012, 11:43:43 PM
what a great thread! Great tips and recepies! maybe this needs a sticky so we can come back to it easily?

BTW I have been burning Google up looking for Silesian pans on line to purchase
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 08, 2012, 11:49:43 PM
Angerland, did you have any luck finding one?     The closest I've come is the disk down in the woods... I'm still pondering on how to get those things off..... my hammer doesnt seem to do the trick.

:)

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Angerland on June 09, 2012, 12:55:15 AM
No luck yet WW. I will post it up as soon as I do!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on June 09, 2012, 10:52:32 AM
Angerland, did you have any luck finding one?     The closest I've come is the disk down in the woods... I'm still pondering on how to get those things off..... my hammer doesnt seem to do the trick.

:)

WW.



Did you try the local implement dealers, like I suggested before WW?  Hurry up before the scrap-haulers make their semi-annual runs :doh: :coffee:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 09, 2012, 12:28:55 PM
I actually checked out the John Deere place.   28.00 for one with a hole and with out they can order one in for 37.00....     yeeesh...

Sooner or later I'm going to find a welder who's willing to fill a hole for me... :)   


WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on June 09, 2012, 12:48:09 PM
I actually checked out the John Deere place.   28.00 for one with a hole and with out they can order one in for 37.00....     yeeesh...

Sooner or later I'm going to find a welder who's willing to fill a hole for me... :)   


WW.


For a JUNK one out of the scrap pile?........HOLY KRAP :doh:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 09, 2012, 02:00:15 PM
Umm...no...  they didnt say they had junk ones.   These were brand new oily lookin things.    :)

When I was standing there looking at them.. and said.. " holy crap"... he said.. " ya.. and to think some farmers have to replace four or five of them when they hit one of these granite rocks"...  uuuuufda....

And he's never heard of a discada....   I DID hint at a side biz for him...but the glazed look said I lost him.....   ha ha

Back to Moes post.    Anyone here use cereal for snacking ?  Like a gorp but can be used in heated water for a hot meal if needed?    Granola or Grape Nuts come to mind.

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 09, 2012, 02:07:25 PM
.......
Back to Moes post.    Anyone here use cereal for snacking ?  Like a gorp but can be used in heated water for a hot meal if needed?    Granola or Grape Nuts come to mind.

WW.
Anything that can be heated in water, I don't like raw. Like granola cereal.
I've made cereal packs of Cheerios, Capt Crunch (or similar), a few raisins and/or some Frosted Mini-Wheats. Okay dry, and add some milk (1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water) and you have a passable breakfast.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 09, 2012, 02:22:45 PM
The reason I asked was because I came across a bunch of homemade granola recipes and thought these might be good things to make, break into chunks and have in a jar in the car for emergencies.    I dont think they'd go horribly stale in the heat of the car if they are sealed in a jar.  ?      And if the emergency or 'darn I forgot to take something with to eat"  was on a chilly day , just heating up some water and dumping these chunks in would have a hot meal for the gut.

Ideas on this idea?

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 09, 2012, 02:54:37 PM
I never found any cereal I could eat wet with just plain water, or rather wanted to.
Although Special K and Coke is delish! No...seriously! I tried that at the Oregon Caves snack shop when I was about 14, and have it every once in awhile just for nostalgia. It sorta "fizzes" when you chew it. Hahaha!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on June 09, 2012, 04:49:43 PM
The reason I asked was because I came across a bunch of homemade granola recipes and thought these might be good things to make, break into chunks and have in a jar in the car for emergencies.    I dont think they'd go horribly stale in the heat of the car if they are sealed in a jar.  ?      And if the emergency or 'darn I forgot to take something with to eat"  was on a chilly day , just heating up some water and dumping these chunks in would have a hot meal for the gut.

Ideas on this idea?

WW.


Add Peanut butter and/or chocolate chunks/chips & let melt together with the rest... Ya won't need to wait for a reason to eat.
 ;)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on June 09, 2012, 04:57:24 PM
Not comfortable using a $2 SS dish??? Gotta get a implement from a tractor to cook with?


Geeez, yur not in Paris & looking for foie de gras, escargot, cheese & fine wines, are ya? Just wantin to cook with something lightweight, inexpensive & over a flame/fire...


lookng for something compact & multi-use???... although a "disk" might be alright for a hat ....in a pinch... along with cooking if treated right... I think ya can find something else...
Although I think the suggestions are reasonable.
Personally, I  wouldn't want to carry one  of them disks very far... without a mule or a horse...
 ;)
Options though.. always options...
 :)


Just remember "what" ya have to carry, unless ya got a "way" of carrying.
 :D

Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 11, 2012, 09:29:36 PM
LOL MnSport... I'm still looking at all my options....       

I have a large wok, and I love using it to stir fry.    But its just too 'bowlish' for taking with me.   I liked that flat pan much better.  :)     A disk fits that flat idea.    And yes.. that disk at the store was heavy.

I'm still looking for a stainless steel bowl thats on the flat side too.  So far everything I've found is quite deep.

I found some hubcaps in the barn the other day....  oooold ones...  bowl shaped.... I'm still debating on pounding them flatter... LOL     

Moe,  Please post more ideas on what foods you take out for meal making.     If the wind ever stops here I'd like to try your stew out on the six footer stove and my lil cast iron pot.   I wont be hauling it anywhere far...but just want to say I can do it outdoors.  :)

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 11, 2012, 10:35:40 PM
LOL MnSport... I'm still looking at all my options....       

I have a large wok, and I love using it to stir fry.    But its just too 'bowlish' for taking with me.   I liked that flat pan much better.  :)     A disk fits that flat idea.    And yes.. that disk at the store was heavy.

One thing about woks is there are a bunch of different styles. The deep "bowl" type are western China, or Japanese.  Other areas have different designs
The Mandarin-style pans are much more shallow. This style also lets you make whatever length handle you want in the field, if you can whittle a stick.

(http://i976.photobucket.com/albums/ae250/Old_Philosopher/FireFox%20uploads/87174bc6.jpg)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 12, 2012, 12:13:45 AM
I think I can whittle a stick..   where did you find that one OP?     

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 12, 2012, 12:29:45 AM
I think I can whittle a stick..   where did you find that one OP?     

WW.
It's a 12" pan. There are different sizes here, also.

http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com/town-food-equipment/34742/p374509.aspx

Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Frugal Bohemian on June 12, 2012, 09:15:08 AM
Another option I was looking at briefly was a paella pan.  Smallest I could find though was 11" and I wanted something more in the 9" range.
http://www.amazon.com/Paella-Carbon-Steel-Pan-11-Inch/dp/B003XUO2D0/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1339509535&sr=8-5&keywords=paella+pan+carbon+steel

A crepe pan might fit the bill too, they come in all different sizes:
http://www.amazon.com/De-Buyer-5303-24-steel-crepe/dp/B0019N4ZHQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1339509612&sr=1-1&keywords=crepe+pan+carbon+steel

It's funny you mentioned a hubcap, WW.  I was thinking the exact same thing yesterday.......usi ng a baby moon VW hubcap with the plating stripped off.  That's almost as bushcrafty as making one out of sheet steel!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on June 12, 2012, 10:29:44 AM
LOL MnSport... I'm still looking at all my options....       

I have a large wok, and I love using it to stir fry.    But its just too 'bowlish' for taking with me.   I liked that flat pan much better.  :)     A disk fits that flat idea.    And yes.. that disk at the store was heavy.

I'm still looking for a stainless steel bowl thats on the flat side too.  So far everything I've found is quite deep.

I found some hubcaps in the barn the other day....  oooold ones...  bowl shaped.... I'm still debating on pounding them flatter... LOL     

Moe,  Please post more ideas on what foods you take out for meal making.     If the wind ever stops here I'd like to try your stew out on the six footer stove and my lil cast iron pot.   I wont be hauling it anywhere far...but just want to say I can do it outdoors.  :)

WW.

  I'm going to be sending out your package this afternoon,  you'll find a book in the package titled "Doin' Dutch Oven" by Robert Ririe,  it's got a lot of great recipies in it for all manner of foods,  I've adopted a lot of my ideas for trail cooking from this book,  and the recipies are easily converted to other ways of cooking other than the Dutch oven,  I think you'll like it,  and i think it will give you a lot of ideas that you can tailor to your way of doing things.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 12, 2012, 11:58:05 AM
Thank you , Moe!       I guess I'm going to get my new dutch oven dirty.. :)        My ultimate goal would be to learn to bake bread/buns/biscuits in it...   you'd probably hear me hollar from away over here..  LOL

Do you use alot of chicken to cook with outdoors in these ovens?

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on June 12, 2012, 12:44:42 PM
Thank you , Moe!       I guess I'm going to get my new dutch oven dirty.. :)        My ultimate goal would be to learn to bake bread/buns/biscuits in it...   you'd probably hear me hollar from away over here..  LOL

Do you use alot of chicken to cook with outdoors in these ovens?

WW.

  Well this book has a few chapters that cover baking breads and pastries,  how to do it as well as recipies for doughs and batters,  including sour dough recipes,  many of them give you oven temps and conversions to how many coals to use for the Dutch Oven top and bottom, as well as times.
  I thought you'd like it.
 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 12, 2012, 01:00:35 PM
I do think I will.. I dont have a dutch oven or outdoor cooking book.  :)     

Does pheasant fit into trail food?      I'm about to plug one.. he's been wandering around my house and since my windows are open his call every 10 mins is driving me nuts..   I've hollared at him a few times.. Told him to go find another girlfriend.. I'm taken.    But it seems he's determined......... ..    Even threats to tie his butt feathers to a hook for fishing gear dont scare him.....

WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on June 12, 2012, 03:21:56 PM
I do think I will.. I dont have a dutch oven or outdoor cooking book.  :)     

Does pheasant fit into trail food?      I'm about to plug one.. he's been wandering around my house and since my windows are open his call every 10 mins is driving me nuts..   I've hollared at him a few times.. Told him to go find another girlfriend.. I'm taken.    But it seems he's determined......... ..    Even threats to tie his butt feathers to a hook for fishing gear dont scare him.....

WW.

  Phesants are good eats, but they are a pain to pluck,  I usually skin mine,  and they are extra lean,  so you'll have to add fat to the bird to make it moist.

  I marinate mine in Italian salad dressing in a freezer bag over night,  that plumps them up a bit and adds a little flavor,  the next day I rinse the bird with fresh water and pat dry with paper towels,  then I give it a rub with light olive oil,  a little salt and pepper and a sprinkle of dried rosemary,  then I drape the bird with a few strips of bacon and roast it on the middle rack of the oven at 325 until the juces run clear and the legs pull off easy,  it's also good to baste it with pan dripings or a little more salad dressing.
  Serve with oven roasted potatoes and sweet & sour beets,  YUMMMM. 

  BTW-  you have a PM.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 12, 2012, 08:44:38 PM
YUM .. that does sound good.       But I'll have to wait until this fall ....    lucky him.     I'm not so sure he's not roosting in the tree over the house tonight...   goodness whats with that bird?   LOL

Maybe he likes my loud music?   50's on sirus channel?   Or maybe its the comedy of watching me dance?  Good Heavens.. pheasants dont do mating dances do they?    ***rethinking getting curtains***

WW.

Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 12, 2012, 08:51:50 PM
...
Maybe he likes my loud music?   50's on sirus channel?   Or maybe its the comedy of watching me dance?  ...
Hummm.... I'm guessing you're NOT dancing barefoot on the deck waving a hammer at him?  ;D
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on June 12, 2012, 08:54:20 PM
Not yet.....   I'm pretty dang good with a hammer.....    I just make sure theres not a cloud in the sky afore swingin it.

:P


WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on January 21, 2013, 03:45:05 AM
This is kind of a "Bump", but I was just thinking about beverages.This topic, Trail foods and camp cooking that Moe M. started some time ago, came to mind.So, in the interest of reviving this topic,and also so that I don't need to make a new topic, (Unless someone else wants it to be a newtopic), I thought I would ask my question here.


In regard to Trail foods... What type of beverages to you like to carry, or make when you are out? I am not talking about plain water, but things like tea, coffee, cocoa , koolaid, boullion, etc..


    I carry different items to mix in my water & sometimes I also carry a few brews(beer). Occasionally, even an adult beverage of the distilled type. Many times dependent of how long I am going to be out, how much I want to carry with me at the time & convenience. Some folks like to drink the same thing all the time, & others like me, like to change things up a bit & take different things... I usually have all the items I listed above with me at sometime or another or an assortment so I can make what ever strikes me as a tasty drink at the time. As an example, I really like to have a cup of bullion, just as much as tea or coffee when it is cold out... But I am curious to hear what others prefer. So , are you the type who sticks to one or or maybe 2 types, or many like I do. Along with the OP & topic Moe M. started here, about Trail Foods & camp cooking , and the subject of what they are bringing along to eat & how they are cooking the food... Maybe some folks can also add what they like to drink when out & about in the outdoors..


{Moe M. - if ya would like me to remove this post & start a separate topic, I will do so, no problem. :) Just thought to try to include it with this(your)topic as it is closely related, as far as I see it. :) }
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on January 21, 2013, 06:13:48 AM
At the dollar store I found boxes of Hawiian Punch singles in four or five different flavors.   I put a few of each flavor in with the pack.   
 
I also have coffee singles, tea bags, and apple cider singles along.   
 
I'm afraid of heating up some water and it will have a nasty taste to it...so now I have something to pour in and hide the flavor.  :)
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on January 21, 2013, 06:17:22 AM
This is kind of a "Bump", but I was just thinking about beverages.This topic, Trail foods and camp cooking that Moe M. started some time ago, came to mind.So, in the interest of reviving this topic,and also so that I don't need to make a new topic, (Unless someone else wants it to be a newtopic), I thought I would ask my question here.


In regard to Trail foods... What type of beverages to you like to carry, or make when you are out? I am not talking about plain water, but things like tea, coffee, cocoa , koolaid, boullion, etc..


    I carry different items to mix in my water & sometimes I also carry a few brews(beer). Occasionally, even an adult beverage of the distilled type. Many times dependent of how long I am going to be out, how much I want to carry with me at the time & convenience. Some folks like to drink the same thing all the time, & others like me, like to change things up a bit & take different things... I usually have all the items I listed above with me at sometime or another or an assortment so I can make what ever strikes me as a tasty drink at the time. As an example, I really like to have a cup of bullion, just as much as tea or coffee when it is cold out... But I am curious to hear what others prefer. So , are you the type who sticks to one or or maybe 2 types, or many like I do. Along with the OP & topic Moe M. started here, about Trail Foods & camp cooking , and the subject of what they are bringing along to eat & how they are cooking the food... Maybe some folks can also add what they like to drink when out & about in the outdoors..


{Moe M. - if ya would like me to remove this post & start a separate topic, I will do so, no problem. :) Just thought to try to include it with this(your)topic as it is closely related, as far as I see it. :) }

  Nope,  stay right where you are, it's all good.

  But since you asked,  Personally I have a problem with plain water,  having discussed the problem in the past I've found that a lot of folks do as well,  my problem is the bland taste of plain water.
  There's times like in the heat of summer that there's nothing better than good, cold, filtered water,  but for me it doesn't happen all that often,  i'm a soda lover,  but I try to keep it in check,  iced tea, iced coffee, carbonated water both flavored and not are my favorites,  i'm not a kool-aid kind of guy,  but Gateraid and those types of cold drinks I find are also good anytime.
  I've tried a few of the powdered mixes for water like those in the straws that you rip the top off and pour into water,  they are all either sugarless or made with sugar substitutes and taste like crap to me as well.
  So for me,  trail drinks are usually tea, coffee, plain water, hot choclate, coffee with a little hot choclate mixed into it,  or powdered lemonaid, or iced tea mixed with water,  day hikes will find an occational Coke or Bud in my pack,  in damp of cool weather I tote a flask of flavored brandy along as well.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on January 21, 2013, 09:56:03 AM
Of all the powdered drink mixes I've tried (which is very few), I have to favor Crystal Lite (tm) for flavor. I've even used it as a mixer with rum.  :P
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Draco on January 21, 2013, 08:20:36 PM
The only thing I do is instant coffee.  The rest of the time it is water for me. 

On the subject of trail food I go for the easy stuff but as I have said I am first and foremost a backpacker and try to go light.  Yes I do Mountain House but I also do the freezer bag cooking.  Some of my favorite is one cup instant rice and one package of Lipton soup mix.  Add a cup of boiling water and wait 5 minutes or so then dump in a package of chicken or tuna.  Very filling and pretty darn tasty without all the sodium of Mountain House. 

One thing I have not tried is scrambled eggs in a freezer bag.  You crack the eggs in the bag and then put the bag in boiling water and stir every once in a while.  Has anyone ever tried this?  I have done it in a microwave but not in boiling water. 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on January 21, 2013, 08:41:24 PM
Yeah, we've done that with the Boy Scout troop.....real handy way to get everybody fed, fast!  A kettle or Dutch oven part way filled with boiling water, some finely minced peppers, onions, crumbled bacon, chopped Spam, browned & crumbled sausage, croutons, salt & pepper, hot sauce, etc. for each boy to customize his eggs and an indelible marker to write his name on the outside of the bag and let 'em do there own.  Crack a couple of eggs in each bag, squish them around after adding whatever they want in them, zip them and toss into the kettle for 5-7 minutes, pick them out, unzip and eat out of the bag.  If you are careful, you don't even need a spoon :P.   Toss the bag in the carry-out trash and we're ready to start our daily activity or class! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: PetrifiedWood on January 21, 2013, 08:50:23 PM
I've learned to like plain water, but only clean filtered stuff from the fridge or a bottle. Boiled creek water needs some sprucing up with something to make it taste better. I like that Mio water stuff that comes in a little squirt bottle. There is enough in one bottle to flavor a gallon or more depending on how strong you make it.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Draco on January 21, 2013, 09:06:44 PM
I will have to give it a try Wolfy.  Some eggs for breakfast sure sounds better than oatmeal. 

PW Creek water is not too bad.  It is that nasty green swamp water with the dead floaty things that I have to hold my nose to drink down.  :)  But get me thirsty enough and it's all good. 
Title: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Bearhunter on January 21, 2013, 09:56:07 PM
I will have to give it a try Wolfy.  Some eggs for breakfast sure sounds better than oatmeal. 

PW Creek water is not too bad.  It is that nasty green swamp water with the dead floaty things that I have to hold my nose to drink down.  :)  But get me thirsty enough and it's all good.
I bet the green swamp water is pretty close to the pond water I use to drink as a kid :D
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on January 21, 2013, 10:37:33 PM
A package of Chicken Rice-a-Roni along with its flavor pack put into about five cups of water and added chicken makes a great soup.  Just ignore the instructions on the box.  Browned hamburger with the beef flavor works nicely too.  Add veggies to either if you need to feed more.
 
WW 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: PetrifiedWood on January 30, 2013, 10:12:05 PM
Making this one a sticky.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on February 19, 2013, 08:09:30 AM
   I've been reading over some of the posts in this thread and thought I give it a bump up to keep it from going stale and add a bit of something to keep it interesting to some.

   I'm not a big fan of prepackaged backpacking foods like Mountainhouse or Coleman freeze dried meals,  though there are a  few that I do enjoy,  Romens and the series of "sides" that Knor's put out are pretty good,  and Orida instant potatoes are pretty quick to prepare and easily doctored to make them taste good.
  Rice is something that I enjoy on the trail quite a bit,  but being old school and fussy about the taste of what I eat I'm not prone to using quick fix or minute type fixings,  real cooked oatmeal and real steamed rice is so much better in taste and texture than the "dump in boiling water, Wait a minute and eat" stuff that it's worth the extra little time to prepare and cook in my opinion.
  One of my favorites is my version of oriental rice,  for this I carry a small sandwich zip lock bags of dried veggies,  some granulated bullion,  and some Soy Sauce,  for those who order take out Chinese,  the small packets that you usually get with your order work good for this kind of thing,  and I usually always pack a small yellow onion and a medium sized fresh potato in my food bag,  they can be used in many different ways so the little extra weight is worth it.
  How I fix my rice is simple,  I usually use regular long grain white rice,  I wash it (soak in clear water) to get the starch dust off of it and let it drain while I get the rest of my ingredients ready,  I use one cup of dried rice to 1-3/4 cups of water.
  I use my Canteen cup or MSR Seagull pot,  I pour in the water, add a tablespoon full of veggie oil or butter,  salt & pepper to taste,  one heaping teaspoon of Beef or Chicken bullion,  a full tablespoon of dark Soy sauce,  then add about 1/4 cup each of chopped onion and dried veggies (carrots, onion, celery, and what ever else is in the packet.
  Next I bring the liquid to a boil, then pour the rice in and give it a stir,  when the pot comes back to a boil I move it to a cooler place on the fire so that it's at a slow simmer and cover the pot,  it usually takes twenty minutes to cook,  but start checking it after fifteen.
  When the water is all absorbed take the pot away from the heat,  fluff up the rice, recover and let stand for about five minutes or so,  give it another good stir,  and enjoy a hearty and good tasting rice dinner.

  I'm sure that individual tastes differ and that you will be adjusting the ingredients to suit your own likes,  but this is a dish that is easily changed to that end,  you may also as I do, want to add some meat to the dish,  I've used jerky, dried pork, sausage, spam,  and canned tuna in making it and all have been tasty.

  So for you folk that like to do a little cooking in camp and don't mind a little prep,  this makes a pretty quick and delicious meal,  and some mild green tea with it make a great accent to the meal.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on February 19, 2013, 10:32:08 AM
Rice is a staple around the world, and so versatile it makes great camp food.
A few years ago we started using Jasmine rice, rather than long grained white rice. Much more flavor, IMO.
The other thing I like about the Jasmine is the cooking time. Whereas long grain might take 20-25 minutes (sometimes 35 depending upon altitude), Jasmine is done in 10. with a 5 minute 'setup time' off the heat at the end.

The only time we rinse our rice is if it comes from China. Indian or Japanese rice doesn't really need it, at least not for safety reasons.

Like Moe, we measure the rice and water, bring the water to a boil, dump in the rice (and any herbs/flavoring) and return to a boil.  And I totally agree that 'instant' rice tastes like crap...about like using 'Quick Oats'.

I learned a trick from my BIL years ago. If you don't have any way to measure the proportions of rice to water, do this: 
Rice is going to just about double in volume, so put an appropriate amount of rice grains in your pot. Add cold water until the water level is about one finger knuckle above the top of the rice. For most people that's about an inch, and an easy way to measure. It doesn't mater how much, or how little rice you're using, that's going to give you the proper rice to water ratio.  Bring the pot to a boil, cover and start timing according to the type of rice you're using, and the altitude.  Carry on as usual with letting it rest and fluffing it up.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on February 19, 2013, 10:52:18 AM
And another thing about rice, it can be dried up again after a meal if you used too much or cannot eat the whole meal.   Just spread it out on tin foil near the fire to dry back up.   Pack into a baggy.   When the next meal comes around, just add some water and simmer it back to life again. :)   
 
I've done this with just plain rice and saved the left overs.  Instead of water I heat up milk, toss in some sugar/cinnamon and then added the left over rice for a breakfast meal.  Having some butter with you for a good dallop makes it taste richer.
 
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on February 19, 2013, 11:47:26 AM
Rice is a staple around the world, and so versatile it makes great camp food.
A few years ago we started using Jasmine rice, rather than long grained white rice. Much more flavor, IMO.
The other thing I like about the Jasmine is the cooking time. Whereas long grain might take 20-25 minutes (sometimes 35 depending upon altitude), Jasmine is done in 10. with a 5 minute 'setup time' off the heat at the end.

The only time we rinse our rice is if it comes from China. Indian or Japanese rice doesn't really need it, at least not for safety reasons.




Like Moe, we measure the rice and water, bring the water to a boil, dump in the rice (and any herbs/flavoring) and return to a boil.  And I totally agree that 'instant' rice tastes like crap...about like using 'Quick Oats'.

I learned a trick from my BIL years ago. If you don't have any way to measure the proportions of rice to water, do this: 
Rice is going to just about double in volume, so put an appropriate amount of rice grains in your pot. Add cold water until the water level is about one finger knuckle above the top of the rice. For most people that's about an inch, and an easy way to measure. It doesn't mater how much, or how little rice you're using, that's going to give you the proper rice to water ratio.  Bring the pot to a boil, cover and start timing according to the type of rice you're using, and the altitude.  Carry on as usual with letting it rest and fluffing it up.
 

  I like Jasmine also,  but my wife is not fond of it,  when i can get it I use Basmatti instead of long grain white,  for the last six months or so Stop and Shop's store brand long grain white has been extra long and extra tender,  so I've stocked up on it.
  I have been washing my white rice for a long time,  I was wathing an episode of Good Eats one day devoted to cooking rice,  Elton explained that in the processing of white rice a starchy dust was created that stuck to the rice,  when cooked the dust makes the rice sticky which is great when it's all you have and your making sushi,  but I like my rice fluffy and tender,  washing it as he suggested makes it a lot better for my taste texture wise.
  Flavored rice and Brown rice doesn't and shouldn't be washed for best results.

  Excellent tip BYW OP on measuring rice to water mixture.

  Another is, when cooking white rice the rule of thumb is equal parts of rice and water,  but,  less water will give you a fluffier rice,  more water will give you a more dense and moist texture.
  I prepare mine using a measure of 1-cup of rice to 1-3/4 cups of water,  cook it approx. 20 minutes at a slow simmer after the initial boil,  and letting it set for 8 ~ 10 minutes off the heat covered after fluffing it up a bit with a fork.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on February 19, 2013, 11:52:35 AM
And another thing about rice, it can be dried up again after a meal if you used too much or cannot eat the whole meal.   Just spread it out on tin foil near the fire to dry back up.   Pack into a baggy.   When the next meal comes around, just add some water and simmer it back to life again. :)   
 
I've done this with just plain rice and saved the left overs.  Instead of water I heat up milk, toss in some sugar/cinnamon and then added the left over rice for a breakfast meal.  Having some butter with you for a good dallop makes it taste richer.
 
 
WW.

   I usually make 1-1/2 cups of dry rice to just under 3-cups of water and what ever seasonings (salt,pepper, butter), for the two of us,  we like rice, so it's usually gone in a couple of days,  but when we do end up with left over rice it usually ends up as rice pudding.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on February 19, 2013, 12:13:01 PM
I like a REALY dry rice, and rinsing off the starch dust helps, for sure. The reason I mentioned the Chinese rice is that rinsing rice from China, or Southeast Asia is a health issue. Not only the conditions under which the rice is processed, but packaged as well. I wish I had the link handy, but reading some of the advice about buying and cooking rice would make your socks curl!

We add all sorts of stuff to our rice as it's cooking. Our whole family favorite is Rosemary Rice.  A heaping tablespoon of dried rosemary to 1 1/2 cu dry rice is a good place to start.

Moe, if you like fluffy tender rice give this a shot:
We cook all our rice in either a stainless sauce pan, or restaurant grade aluminum pot. This won't work in a rice cooker.
Put just a small amount of your favorite frying oil/shortening in your rice pot. Just enough to swirl around and coat the bottom. Dump in your rice. Stir and fry the rice until you see a few grains starting to turn translucent or even brown. Slowly pour in your pre-measured cold water. Yes, stand back!  The cold water fractures the hulls of the hot rice and 'pops' them slightly. Bring to a boil and proceed as usual.  You'll notice when you get to the fluffing stage, that the rice is the least sticky you've probably ever seen, and the grains are wonderfully tender.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on February 19, 2013, 12:26:06 PM
I like a REALY dry rice, and rinsing off the starch dust helps, for sure. The reason I mentioned the Chinese rice is that rinsing rice from China, or Southeast Asia is a health issue. Not only the conditions under which the rice is processed, but packaged as well. I wish I had the link handy, but reading some of the advice about buying and cooking rice would make your socks curl!

We add all sorts of stuff to our rice as it's cooking. Our whole family favorite is Rosemary Rice.  A heaping tablespoon of dried rosemary to 1 1/2 cu dry rice is a good place to start.

Moe, if you like fluffy tender rice give this a shot:
We cook all our rice in either a stainless sauce pan, or restaurant grade aluminum pot. This won't work in a rice cooker.
Put just a small amount of your favorite frying oil/shortening in your rice pot. Just enough to swirl around and coat the bottom. Dump in your rice. Stir and fry the rice until you see a few grains starting to turn translucent or even brown. Slowly pour in your pre-measured cold water. Yes, stand back!  The cold water fractures the hulls of the hot rice and 'pops' them slightly. Bring to a boil and proceed as usual.  You'll notice when you get to the fluffing stage, that the rice is the least sticky you've probably ever seen, and the grains are wonderfully tender.

  Thanks, I'll give that a try,  I generally make my rice in a SS covered sauce pan,  when I'm in a hurry or if I'm making specialty rice like my oriental rice I might use my rice cooker,  the thing make great rice,  but it's actually easier to just clean the SS pan than to get out the cooker, plug it in,  and then have to clean the cooker pot and the rubber seal around the top of the cooker,  mostly I use it as a small stew pot , steamer, or pressure cooker.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Yeoman on February 19, 2013, 12:56:45 PM
Something I found a few years ago is that frozen meat keeps pretty well on the trail.
I discovered this by two accidents.
I was doing a five day hike on the Juan De Fuca Trail on Vancouver Island. I had frozen a small steak and put it in a ziplock bag and planned to eat it that night. Problem was that it was still frozen solid after a day in my pack in +25 deg C (80ish F) weather. I boiled it.
A few days later I discovered something else. The area inside my pack, next to the outer side of my pack was cold. Not cool, cold. My socks and my sweater were in the clothing bag at that spot and they felt like they had been in a fridge. I couldn't get over it until I was packing up the next day and lashed 2L soft resevoire to the outside of my pack. Aha! evaporation. Got it.
I thus experimented with keeping frozen food in my pack against the redneck a/c. I've kept a steak frozen for three days. Bacon and ground beef or veggie ground round don't seem to have the mass to stay frozen as well or as long but they'll last many days longer than you'd think.
I wrap a steak or pork chop in cling wrap then a layer of newspaper and then put the whole thing in a baggie. This goes into the food bag. If I have a sweater or a towel then I wrap the whole food bag in it and position it in my pack to be against the outside wall right next to the water bladder.
It makes for heavier food loads but hey, yummy!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: xune on February 19, 2013, 01:14:09 PM
Wow Yeoman, didn't think that a steak could stay frozen for so long in such weather! Thanks for the tip, I'll have to try that out!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on February 19, 2013, 03:04:55 PM
Something I found a few years ago is that frozen meat keeps pretty well on the trail.
I discovered this by two accidents.
I was doing a five day hike on the Juan De Fuca Trail on Vancouver Island. I had frozen a small steak and put it in a ziplock bag and planned to eat it that night. Problem was that it was still frozen solid after a day in my pack in +25 deg C (80ish F) weather. I boiled it.
A few days later I discovered something else. The area inside my pack, next to the outer side of my pack was cold. Not cool, cold. My socks and my sweater were in the clothing bag at that spot and they felt like they had been in a fridge. I couldn't get over it until I was packing up the next day and lashed 2L soft resevoire to the outside of my pack. Aha! evaporation. Got it.
I thus experimented with keeping frozen food in my pack against the redneck a/c. I've kept a steak frozen for three days. Bacon and ground beef or veggie ground round don't seem to have the mass to stay frozen as well or as long but they'll last many days longer than you'd think.
I wrap a steak or pork chop in cling wrap then a layer of newspaper and then put the whole thing in a baggie. This goes into the food bag. If I have a sweater or a towel then I wrap the whole food bag in it and position it in my pack to be against the outside wall right next to the water bladder.
It makes for heavier food loads but hey, yummy!

  You are right,  it is amazing how long some foods will stay frozen and thaw slowly enough to keep them fresh for an extended period even in warm weather,  about eight years ago six of us did a three day primitive camp out in central CT., it was in late August,  the weather was damp and hot,  the bugs were the worst problem at night,  but the days were not bad.
  We had planned our food around stuff that didn't need refrigeration except for the first night,  we had planned to have ribeye steaks w/baked potato and greens,  Marshall was in charge of getting the steaks at his local butcher shop,  he picked them up the week before the trip and froze them wrapped separately in plastic wrap then placed in a zip lock freezer bag.
  The morning of the event he wrapped the bag in news paper just in case they leaked through the freezer bag when thawing,  he then wrapped that in his rain jacket and put it in his pack,  that evening he took the steaks out and they were still froze solid,  we made something else and decided to see how long the steaks would stay frozen,  we ended up having them on the third day,  but we had to take them out of their news paper wrap to get them to finish thawing in time for dinner.
  I have no doubt that they would have been thawed by day four,  but cold enough to have been fresh enough to cook on day five.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on February 19, 2013, 03:20:23 PM
That's standard operating procedure in the BWCA, too.  Chicken is usually taken for the first night out and steaks for the second night, but there have been times when we had to eat one of our dehydrated meals the first night and then have the chicken and beef for the 2nd & 3rd night's meals because they were still frozen.  Usually the steaks are just this side of having ice in them on third night, too :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on February 19, 2013, 05:21:44 PM
Thanks Moe M., for your tips on making a rice dish "out in the sticks". Your description of how you make it in a G.I. canteen cup was a pretty darn good description/recipe, for those of us who use them.
 :thumbsup:


The "finger" rule that ... I think Old P. mentioned is a good one to remember also.
 :)


 I can handle rice every once in a while, & it is easy to carry, & fairly non- perishable...  but I am not a good "rice" cook/chef. I can cook/BBQ/etc. a lot of things, open fire/pit stove top etc...but I am a crappy "rice" guy. Must be that I am Scots-Irish...
Give me Meat & Potatoes.. no troubles.. Rice...not so good.. Particularly brown rice..


Thnx again for your mention of it here, in the "Trail foods & camp cooking" topic.
It is a great subject. Your post earlier, to help all of us in knowing a good recipe & idea to try, using rice, is a great addition to the topic, IMO.
 :D


BTW...Yeomans talking about bringing meat along ona trip, is more along the way I do things. I much prefer eating what is provided thru your own efforts, on trips where you can hunt or fish, more than trips where I have to bring things. I am definitely not a fan of things you add boiling water in the bag/pot, in order make it edible.  Although, I will use them "in a pinch",or on a short trip.
 :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Anubis1335 on February 19, 2013, 05:41:04 PM
Boneless chicken breasts (or thighs) or hamburger wrapped in foil w/ onion and potato is pretty good grub.  bell pepper or jalapeno added is great w/ it too.  Put ingredients in foil wrap up place near fire. 

A good lil ez dessert is a dump cake in a DO.  If you're packin in the DO the ingredients weight is no big whoop. 

Can of crushed pineapple or two depending on DO size
2 cans of fruit pie filling...cherry, blueberry, blackberry etc
box of white cake (use the mix dry...do not add any of the ingredients to make it a cake)
some melted butter or margarine.  (im assuming since you are packin that heavy @ss DO, you got an ice chest too)

LINE YOUR DO W DO LINERS!!! 
then place all the ingredients in the order i typed them...
Drizzle w/ melted butter or margarine
Bake til bubbly. 

Pretty EZ "cobbler". 

MY mini-me absolutely loves it <3
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on February 19, 2013, 06:33:30 PM
Anubis, I wonder if we could figure out a way to do single servings of that dessert?   Like using frozen blueberries and frozen chunks of pineapple with a handful of mini marshmellows in the bottom of the GI mess kit, a 1/4 cup of that cake mix spread over and drizzle with butter?  Bake in that closed mess kit like you would a DO with a few coals on top?   Parchment paper could be cut to fit for a liner.
 
What do you think?  Will this work?   I wish I wasnt hiney deep in snow up here.. I'd go out and try it. :)
 
WW.
 
 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Anubis1335 on February 19, 2013, 06:40:45 PM
i bet it sho 'nuff would work WW. 

I have said usgi mess kit and the canteen cup...and i also have a german mess kit that it may work in as well...HMMMMMMM.... seems like an experiment is in order

actually you could just whittle down the canned ingredients...i bet the extras would keep well in the fridge.  and the cake mix you just have to put a decent layer over...no idea how that would translate into measurements.  and the extra could be kept in a ziplock baggie as well


Really cool idea WW!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Draco on February 19, 2013, 06:43:42 PM
I just find Dr. McDougall's soups and Asian (Ramon Noodles) cups.  The dry ingredients can be taken out of the cups and put in zip lock.  They are not as cheap as regular Ramon Noodles but they are much less than Mountain House.  They are pretty good.  At least they are different as I am getting pretty tired of the two or three Mountain House ones I like.  ;) 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on February 27, 2013, 10:47:47 AM
Thanks Moe M., for your tips on making a rice dish "out in the sticks". Your description of how you make it in a G.I. canteen cup was a pretty darn good description/recipe, for those of us who use them.
 :thumbsup:


The "finger" rule that ... I think Old P. mentioned is a good one to remember also.
 :)


 I can handle rice every once in a while, & it is easy to carry, & fairly non- perishable...  but I am not a good "rice" cook/chef. I can cook/BBQ/etc. a lot of things, open fire/pit stove top etc...but I am a crappy "rice" guy. Must be that I am Scots-Irish...
Give me Meat & Potatoes.. no troubles.. Rice...not so good.. Particularly brown rice..


Thnx again for your mention of it here, in the "Trail foods & camp cooking" topic.
It is a great subject. Your post earlier, to help all of us in knowing a good recipe & idea to try, using rice, is a great addition to the topic, IMO.
 :D


BTW...Yeomans talking about bringing meat along ona trip, is more along the way I do things. I much prefer eating what is provided thru your own efforts, on trips where you can hunt or fish, more than trips where I have to bring things. I am definitely not a fan of things you add boiling water in the bag/pot, in order make it edible.  Although, I will use them "in a pinch",or on a short trip.
 :)

   Mtn.Spts.,  I may have mentioned it here somewhere before but it's worth mentioning again,  I like regular rice as opposed to minute rice for several reasons, first is that I think I can control the outcome of the rice better,  but more important is that when I'm camp cooking I often make a one pot rice meal,  it's filling and satisfying,  and I dress it up with fillers that make it a meal and not just a bowl of rice,  which works out good because of the extra cooking time of the regular rice over minute rice.
  My grub bag usually contains some fresh produce,  a potato, onion, and a couple of carrots for sure,  and usually a zip lock sandwich bag of assorted dried vegetables of some kind,  I also pack either a small summer sausage, pepperoni stick, or double smoked polish sausage,  all of which keep very well unrefrigerated for up to a week if kept out of the hot sun.
  For a solo meal such as with rice my USGI Canteen cup is ideal,  it works well over coals,  with my alcohol "cat" stove,  and if I'm careful my pocket rocket stove works well also,  but with the PR stove you have to keep an eye out that it doesn't burn the bottom of your rice.
  One of my usual recipes calls for one cup of washed white long grain rice,  two cups of water,  and what ever else I plan to put in it.
  I get my ingredients ready ahead of time,  usually it's one good teaspoon of granulated chicken bullion,  about 1/2 cup of fresh chopped onion,  1/2 a cup of dried veggies (soaked in warm water for about ten minutes), about 1/4 cup of what ever meat you have,  salt, pepper, and a little cayenne pepper to taste,  and one tablespoon of light olive oil.
  I bring the two cups of water to a boil in my canteen cup,  pour in the oil,  then add the seasonings and all the veggies and the meat,  i let it come back to a boil and stir in my rice,  then cover the cup and lower the heat so that I get just a gentle simmer,  it's usually cooked in about 15 or 20 minutes,  take it off the heat, remove the cover and fluff up the rice, making sure to stir up the veggies (they sometimes settle),  replace the cover and let set for another 5 to 8 minutes,  and it's ready to eat.
  Using this recipe you will end up with a full canteen cup of rice entree,  it's filling, so count on having some for breakfast,  covered and cooled it'll keep very well overnight.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on February 28, 2013, 06:41:53 AM
Thanks Moe!
:)


  I will try that recipe/method some time when I am out & about, and remember to bring the other items with me. Looks like a good one!
:thumbsup:


Thnx again!
:D
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on February 28, 2013, 10:24:46 AM
MNSport..    I dont know if you do the cooking at home or not, but every time you or your wife chop up the onions/peppers/carrots ect. for home cooking put a small amount in a baggy and freeze it.   That way you can just grab a frozen baggy full of veggies on your way out the door.   You can do the same for the meats your having at home.  Just save 1/4 cup of it for a GI meal like described above.  Premeasured rice in a baggy in the freezer will help in grabbing up 'dinner' with it right there ready to go. 
 
I've been doing simular at home here.  I've got small bags full of choppped gr.pepper/onion.. or onion/celery/carrots.   And the other night I saved three strips of bacon out of the pound I needed to fry up and cut those into thirds and froze them raw.  I've got chopped cooked chicken and ham ready to go too.
 
I'm ready for spring outdoor cooking.
 
WW.
 
 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on March 08, 2013, 06:59:43 AM
    I did a search for "pressure cooker" in the search here at B&B. But, none of the posts talked about using one out in the field. I saw one being packed in the video/film that OutdoorEnvy posted in this topic here: Winter Camping: "Sub-Artic Winter Bivouacking"
 (http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,5003.0.html)
   But, we never packed or used one, back when I was in doing CWT, & since no one seems to have mentioned using one out in the woods/bush, I thought I would ask here in this topic, about "Trail foods & Camp Cooking", started by Moe, rather than start a new topic.


Anyone ever used a pressure cooker when out in the woods/bush?
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: BUSHYBEARD on March 08, 2013, 07:24:23 AM
MNSport..    I dont know if you do the cooking at home or not, but every time you or your wife chop up the onions/peppers/carrots ect. for home cooking put a small amount in a baggy and freeze it.   That way you can just grab a frozen baggy full of veggies on your way out the door.   You can do the same for the meats your having at home.  Just save 1/4 cup of it for a GI meal like described above.  Premeasured rice in a baggy in the freezer will help in grabbing up 'dinner' with it right there ready to go. 
 
I've been doing simular at home here.  I've got small bags full of choppped gr.pepper/onion.. or onion/celery/carrots.   And the other night I saved three strips of bacon out of the pound I needed to fry up and cut those into thirds and froze them raw.  I've got chopped cooked chicken and ham ready to go too.
 
I'm ready for spring outdoor cooking.
 


WW.

WW. just remember to "BLANCH" your veggies/fruit before freezing them this will insure keeping there texture

http://www.ochef.com/617.htm

MnS. YA, i noticed that as well, why not? saves on time and fuel etc.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 08, 2013, 11:30:56 AM
Thats an interesting thought on pressure cookers, MnSport.   
 
I wonder if its because a camp dutch oven is easier to maintain heat and opened to check progress more often than a pressure cooker? 
 
But on the other hand less time means less fuel... I like that idea.  :)
 
I have a pressure pot.. I should haul it out and make friends with it again and maybe give that a try over a wood fire.   What are your thoughts on side heat hurting the gasket/handles/ release valve?
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on March 08, 2013, 11:38:50 AM
I can see all the advantages to a pressure cooker for camping. However, I would personally only use it on a gas stove. The integrity of the seal/gasket is critical, and being aluminum, it might be very easy to damage it in a cooking fire.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on March 08, 2013, 01:00:32 PM
I KNOW I have seen a small model PC built for outdoor high-altitude cooking, but I haven't done a search.   They're out there, though!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on March 08, 2013, 01:00:48 PM
    I did a search for "pressure cooker" in the search here at B&B. But, none of the posts talked about using one out in the field. I saw one being packed in the video/film that OutdoorEnvy posted in this topic here: Winter Camping: "Sub-Artic Winter Bivouacking"
 (http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,5003.0.html)
   But, we never packed or used one, back when I was in doing CWT, & since no one seems to have mentioned using one out in the woods/bush, I thought I would ask here in this topic, about "Trail foods & Camp Cooking", started by Moe, rather than start a new topic.


Anyone ever used a pressure cooker when out in the woods/bush?

  I've never used a pressure cooker in a camp setting,  I have seen pressure cookers made for camping advertised,  but no reviews.

  However,  while watching Dave Canterbury's series ' The journal of the yurt' he mentioned in passing when reviewing some of his pack gear,  that he's used his MSR Seagull pot as a pressure cooker.
  I do have and use a more modern electric pressure cooker at home so I was a bit intrigued by the thought of using a common covered pot as a make shift pressure cooker.
  As OP mentioned in one of his posts above,  pressure cookers depend on a tight seal that holds the steam created in the pot to do the actual cooking,  BUT, a pressure cooker also has a pressure relief valve to insure that the pot doesn't blow up when too much pressure built up.
  I have the same MSR Seagull pot that he was referring to,  in looking it over and doing a little testing I found that the pot lid fits pretty tightly,  it has no seal or gasket
that would cause a real seal,  but it does have a handle that folds over the top of the lid, the handle is notched and fits over a raised lid lifter protrusion on the lid which kind of acts to keep the handle centered on the lid,  the end of the handle is held tightly in place by a hook and toggle type lock.
  I filled the pot half full of water,  put the lid on the pot and latched it closed,  then I turned the pot over and was surprised to find that I had very little leakage of water from the lid,  next I put the pot over my small single burner Coleman propane stove and brought it to a boil,  what I got was a minimal amount of steam escaping from the pot during the boil time,  I'm assuming that the little steady escape of steam would prevent any danger of the pot blowing up and causing any injury,  it just wouldn't be as efficient as a real pressure cooker.
  A pressure cooker is designed to raise the temp of the cooking liquid past the 212 degrees at which water turns to steam to about 240 degrees or so I believe,  and the pressure relief valves are most likely designed to achieve the proper temp while eliminating the danger of too high a pressure.
  That done,  I emptied the pot and put in about one cup of water,  a cup full of stew meat (beef) and a cup full of chopped celery, carrots, and onion, and 1/2 a diced medium potato, some salt, pepper, and 1/2 a teaspoon of granulated beef bullion,  I brought the water to a boil, reduced the heat and placed the cover on loosely,  and let it simmer for about one hour.
  At the end of the hour I took the pot off the heat and checked my stew,  it was cooked,  the veggies were tender and the meat was cooked through but still a bit chewy, which is typical for cheap cuts of meat that need longer braising times,  over all it was very good.
  Next,  I assembled the same ingredients in the pot,  then brought it to a boil as in the previous test,  but this time I took the pot off the heat and lowered the flame to where it was in the simmering process,  I placed the cover on the pot and this time I latched the handle down over the lid causing a pressure fit to the pot and cover,  then I put it back on the stove and timed it for one hour as in the previous batch.
  After the hour was up I shut the burner off and continued to get steam escaping from the pot for about 40 seconds after the burner was Shut off telling me that I did have some trapped pressure left in the pot,  the end result was that everything in the pot was a bit more tender and the meat was no longer chewy,  the flavor of the broth seems to be more intense than the first batch was.
  So my thinking is that while the little Seagull pot didn't equal a pressure cooker,  it was a definite improvement over just a pot and loose fitting lid.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on March 08, 2013, 06:27:08 PM
Old P. The one I have is steel. I think it is a "Regal". I will check & reply when I do.
I "Know",  it is not aluminum.

Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on March 08, 2013, 06:31:41 PM
Moe, I was talking about a "rocker"or a "gauge" style pressure cooker,not a "lets trythis/halfazzed", type cooker. I appreciate your last post. But it is not what I was asking about.
 :D


Although I have that same type pot. I may have to try that method sometime.
Maybe with some rice...
;)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on March 08, 2013, 09:33:55 PM
Old P. The one I have is steel. I think it is a "Regal". I will check & reply when I do.
I "Know",  it is not aluminum.
I cook with heavy gauge aluminum all the time, so that doesn't bother me. My concern was that the rubber gasket in a pressure cooker and the flames from a cook fire might not play well together.  A person would just have to be careful, that's all.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on March 09, 2013, 02:40:01 AM
This one is a "Presto", not a Regal. it is small, (4 qt. I think) compared to our other one we use for canning. I think that larger one is aluminum though. It is stored away at the moment.


I agree Old P. The seal & handles would be my greatest concern. I think "stovetop" might be a better way to use them out in the sticks. I'm not going to ruin mine to find out what open fire/coals would do...
;)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on March 09, 2013, 09:02:00 AM
This one is a "Presto", not a Regal. it is small, (4 qt. I think) compared to our other one we use for canning. I think that larger one is aluminum though. It is stored away at the moment.


I agree Old P. The seal & handles would be my greatest concern. I think "stovetop" might be a better way to use them out in the sticks. I'm not going to ruin mine to find out what open fire/coals would do...
 ;)

LOL! Yeah, I forgot all about plastic handles! That's enough reason to keep it out of the coals!

My cooker is a Mantra. It's spun aluminum. It's set, really. The big pot is 7 qt. There is a fry pan that is marked "3-8 qt", but is really 2.25 qts. (?)  It came with a bunch of racks and dividers so you can supposedly cook a bunch of different foods at the same time, including a 'rice steamer'.  I call it my "poor man's microwave".

Our big canner is a 20 qt Presto, also spun aluminum. It's a good ol' work horse, and has been through 3 gaskets and 2 gauges in about 30 years.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on March 09, 2013, 09:03:19 AM
Moe, I was talking about a "rocker"or a "gauge" style pressure cooker,not a "lets trythis/halfazzed", type cooker. I appreciate your last post. But it is not what I was asking about.
 :D


Although I have that same type pot. I may have to try that method sometime.
Maybe with some rice...
;)

  JB,  I know what you were talking about,  as I said I have no experience with pressure cookers in the wild,  and remembering the number of accidents that happened with them in the "old days" I'm pretty much still leary of them today, I have a modern programable one that's only good for cooking (pretty much useless for canning),  and I don't use that one much either.
 My post wasn't so much to answer your question as much as it was to offer a possible alturnative to actual pressure cooking in the field and a fun try.

  That said,  I'll try very hard in the future not to stray from the specific when replying to your posts,  I know how hard you try at not being grumpy,  I don't think you're quite there yet,  but keep up the good work.   :thumbsup:   :rofl:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on March 09, 2013, 09:07:18 AM
I was trying hard, Moe...I really was... I just haven't "aged" enough yet...LOL
 :D


I really did appreciate the story & idea, though! Really... I will try this sometime soon. I want to try the "rice" cooking anyway.. I really suck at cooking rice.. I have to try it soon... Maybe next outing..
:)
 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 09, 2013, 09:44:38 AM
My Grandmother had one of those pressure fry pans.   Thats the pan she'd fry snapping turtle in.  So tender you could cut it with a fork.   I wish I had one of those pans..I'd try that out on a fire. 
 
As for trail foods,  our Family Dollar has a bunch of different bags of dried fruits I'm going to purchase and make Gorp bags.   I'll keep them in the freezer for a 'grab and  go'.    I'll pick up the ones that would go good in bannok or oatmeal.
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on March 09, 2013, 09:54:03 AM
My Grandmother had one of those pressure fry pans.   Thats the pan she'd fry snapping turtle in.  So tender you could cut it with a fork.   I wish I had one of those pans..I'd try that out on a fire. 
 ....

Here's one in action, WW. Great for quick 'n' dirty meals for 1 or 2 people.

Drunken Turkey Neck (http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,741.msg12415.html#msg12415)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on March 09, 2013, 11:10:23 AM
I was trying hard, Moe...I really was... I just haven't "aged" enough yet...LOL
 :D


I really did appreciate the story & idea, though! Really... I will try this sometime soon. I want to try the "rice" cooking anyway.. I really suck at cooking rice.. I have to try it soon... Maybe next outing..
:)

  You do know that I'm just poking a little fun at you i'm sure,  and you are a good sport (most of the time  :) ).
 
  Rice is really easy if you remember to do a few things that will help it come out good, 1, washing your white rice will keep it from getting overly sticky,  just put it in a strainer and run it under clear cool water,  in camp, just soak it while moving it around with a spoon,  strain the cloudy water out and rinse one more time.
  2, add your oil or butter, salt and pepper and what ever other seasoning you want to use to your water, then bring it up to a boil.
  3, add the rice to the boiling water,  lower the heat to a slow simmer,  and time it for 15~ 20 minutes,  resist the temptation to lift the lid and give it a stir,  it'll come out better if you don't.
  4, Check your rice at the end of the 15~ 20 minutes, if all the water has been absorbed,  take it off the heat,  fluff it up, cover it again,  and let it stand for another 8~10 minutes.
  5, It's ready,  Eat.  :) 

  I have a great rice cooker,  and it does a lot more than just cook rice perfectly,  but most of the time I find it easier just to make it in a covered sauce pan.
 
  I made the recipe I posted last night with oven fried boneless skinless chicken breasts that I cut in half length ways and then butterflied and pounded to about 1/4" thick,  then used flour and egg wash and Panko breadcrumbs to coat the chicken.
  Next I pan fried the chicken in a 1/4" of oil until the crust was golden brown,  then placed them in a 350 oven on a cookie sheet for about 15 minutes to finish baking.
  Serve with a drizzle of honey mustard sauce............

              Equal parts of  Honey, yellow mustard, and mayo,  whisk until smooth.

  Serve over the chicken or in small dipping dishes on the side.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on March 10, 2013, 07:56:34 AM
:D  All is good. Thnx for the rice tips!
:D
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: ro n d on April 11, 2013, 11:42:25 AM
I think my all time favorite was chunks of moose meat on a stick roasted over the coals. 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: werewolf won on April 11, 2013, 11:58:30 AM
I think my all time favorite was chunks of moose meat on a stick roasted over the coals.

Simple is often the best!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on April 11, 2013, 12:44:50 PM
I think my all time favorite was chunks of moose meat on a stick roasted over the coals.

  I loves Moose meat,  but I've never had the pleasure of having it roasted on a stick over coals,  my mouth is watering just thinking about it   :drool:.
  I have had Venison that way (Heart & Liver) from fresh kills,  and it is always fantastic,  thanks for activating my rememberer.   :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Yeoman on April 12, 2013, 10:37:24 AM
My buddy and I will often arrive at a campsite in the woods quite late on a Friday after work. We'll set up the fire and and skewer a small roast on a stick and put it on an angle over the fire. We'll then work on the shelter. Every once in awhile we'll just cut off a hunk of the outside cooked meat. Kind of like a hunk of donair meat in a pizza shop.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on April 12, 2013, 10:45:12 AM
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
:D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
:)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Yeoman on April 12, 2013, 12:39:29 PM
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
:D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
:)

Yeah, of course it's the best way. It has to be. It's the way that causes cancer. ;)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: MnSportsman on April 12, 2013, 08:17:50 PM
Then I figure I'm in Big trouble.
:D
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on April 12, 2013, 09:54:14 PM
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
 :D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
 :)

Yeah, of course it's the best way. It has to be. It's the way that causes cancer. ;)

Yeah...the FDA takes the fun outta everything.  Are eggs good for us, or bad for us this week???
Title: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Bearhunter on April 12, 2013, 09:58:25 PM
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
 :D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
 :)

Yeah, of course it's the best way. It has to be. It's the way that causes cancer. ;)

Yeah...the FDA takes the fun outta everything.  Are eggs good for us, or bad for us this week???

LOL...
I hope they're good for us this week, I had 4 today :P
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on April 13, 2013, 12:27:57 AM
Funny how they can say that about charred meat when thats the OLDEST way of cooking meat , man has had.
 
I think it was the burning of paints, chemicals, teflons, briquet bonding agents....that rang up the 'danger' on meats.... 
 
Or maybe they did the study using chemically treated railroad ties...  bawaaha ha
 
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on April 13, 2013, 12:55:22 AM
Funny how they can say that about charred meat when thats the OLDEST way of cooking meat , man has had.
 
I think it was the burning of paints, chemicals, teflons, briquet bonding agents....that rang up the 'danger' on meats.... 
 
Or maybe they did the study using chemically treated railroad ties...  bawaaha ha
 
 
WW.

I'll just cast my vote for chemical additives in food, freeways too close to the backyard BBQ, and a general effort to divert attention from the real causes of cancer in our modern society. But that's just me.....
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on April 13, 2013, 08:06:00 AM

  No matter what you eat,  it's going to kill you anyway,   there's a story about an Indian who firmly believed that eating was a bad habit,  and he set about to prove it,  when his first child was born he decided to prove his idea,  so they didn't feed the child except for water.
  The child died after about four days,  one of his close friends was trying to console the father by telling him that the child was in a better place and surrounded by the elders that had gone before them,  the dad remarked that he understood that, but was diappointed that the baby wasn't able to grow up to prove his belief that eating was just a bad habit,  citing that It was too bad because he was just getting used to not eating.   
                         :shrug:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on April 13, 2013, 09:36:51 AM
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on April 13, 2013, 09:51:38 AM
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
:shrug: I don't know what 'story' you're referring to, WW, but you've caused me to shake my head a time or two yourself! :taunt:

You're pork steak D.O. dish sounds a lot like something my brother and I do a lot when we're busy out at the farm and want something hot out of the oven for lunch.  Good stuff!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on April 13, 2013, 10:22:07 AM
Who me??    :P      The story of your Indian and the habit of eating had me shaking my head. 
 
Tonight I plan on making a tator tot casserole in the dutch oven.   I would think it would make an ok camp dinner since its not overly important for the tots to be frozen by then.
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on April 13, 2013, 10:30:40 AM
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
:shrug: I don't know what 'story' you're referring to, WW, but you've caused me to shake my head a time or two yourself! :taunt:

You're pork steak D.O. dish sounds a lot like something my brother and I do a lot when we're busy out at the farm and want something hot out of the oven for lunch.  Good stuff!

  I think she's reading too fast.   :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on April 13, 2013, 10:35:53 AM
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
:shrug: I don't know what 'story' you're referring to, WW, but you've caused me to shake my head a time or two yourself! :taunt:

You're pork steak D.O. dish sounds a lot like something my brother and I do a lot when we're busy out at the farm and want something hot out of the oven for lunch.  Good stuff!

  I think she's reading too fast.   :)

Something's out of synch, for sure! :P
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: WoodsWoman on April 13, 2013, 10:50:37 AM
Nope..  my problem is not having my glasses on and not paying attention to who's telling the story.  SOrry about that guys.   :(
 
I'll go find something constructive to do now....     :-\
 
WW.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on April 13, 2013, 11:22:13 AM
Nope..  my problem is not having my glasses on and not paying attention to who's telling the story.  SOrry about that guys.   :(
 
I'll go find something constructive to do now....     :-\
 
WW.

  Don't run away, you've been scarce lately.   :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: OutdoorEnvy on November 12, 2013, 09:40:32 AM
Here's some camp cooking from a hog hunt yesterday.  Hunt yielded no hogs.  But venison fajitas were a nice consolation prize

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7298/10822142933_33422d82d1_b.jpg)

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3757/10822142563_4e3c83c796_b.jpg)

Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on November 12, 2013, 09:53:29 AM
Do you blend your own frajita seasoning, or use a commercial mix? Years ago my BIL got some mix from a restaurant supply outfit, and I've never found anything as good since.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: OutdoorEnvy on November 12, 2013, 10:19:11 AM
Do you blend your own frajita seasoning, or use a commercial mix? Years ago my BIL got some mix from a restaurant supply outfit, and I've never found anything as good since.

For steak meat of any kind I don't like to use seasoning.  For this one I threw in some red pepper but usually do a jalapeno but didn't get one for this trip.  I like to taste the meat and fresh veggies in my fajitas.  Then add a good salsa mix of some kind.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Yeoman on November 12, 2013, 10:26:36 AM
I tried something a bit different the on Sun and Mon while out in the woods.

Sun I did 2 X ramen noodles with their spice packs (veg and spicey chicken) and added a small can of chili tuna. I just boiled water in my little kettle, added the noodles and covered to let them sit for 5 minutes. I drained them a bit, added the spice and tuna, stirred and ate. Hot, hot, hot!

Yesterday, I just mixed a couple of handfuls of brown rice, a handful of quinoa, a small handful of flax seeds, a hand full of corn meal, a handful of lentils and a handful of couscous and a tea spoon of salt. I mixed it all up in a bag and then brought 3/4 of a cup of the mixture with me and a small can of lemon and pepper tuna. I boiled about 2 1/2 cups of water and added the grain mixture and the tuna. I then simmered it over the fire for over an hour until all the grains were cooked (brown rice took longest I suppose). The oil from the tuna kept it from sticking/burning. Very yummy and filling. Something a little different anyways.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: kanukkarhu on November 12, 2013, 11:08:57 AM
I like tuna, and I'm gonna try that, Yeo. Thnx.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Yeoman on November 13, 2013, 05:39:23 AM
KK,
Hope you like it. Those little cans are very convenient. I just burned the can out on the fire afterwards and then after it cooled wrapped it in the zip lock I brought the mixed grains in. The day before I just wrapped it in the Mr. Noodles wrappers.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on November 13, 2013, 09:01:15 AM
I tried something a bit different the on Sun and Mon while out in the woods.

Sun I did 2 X ramen noodles with their spice packs (veg and spicey chicken) and added a small can of chili tuna. I just boiled water in my little kettle, added the noodles and covered to let them sit for 5 minutes. I drained them a bit, added the spice and tuna, stirred and ate. Hot, hot, hot!

Yesterday, I just mixed a couple of handfuls of brown rice, a handful of quinoa, a small handful of flax seeds, a hand full of corn meal, a handful of lentils and a handful of couscous and a tea spoon of salt. I mixed it all up in a bag and then brought 3/4 of a cup of the mixture with me and a small can of lemon and pepper tuna. I boiled about 2 1/2 cups of water and added the grain mixture and the tuna. I then simmered it over the fire for over an hour until all the grains were cooked (brown rice took longest I suppose). The oil from the tuna kept it from sticking/burning. Very yummy and filling. Something a little different anyways.

  I like tuna right out of the can,  I usually buy White Albacor packed in water,  but I can't warm up to tuna mixed in Ramen Noodles,  it's a personal thing I guess,  There is one thing I make once in a while that might sound strange for some but it's not bad for my taste,  I make up a couple of servings of instant mashed potatoes and when done I layer the tuna between two layers of potato and dump a small personal sized serving can of green peas over the top.

  I hear some people complain about instant potatoes being bland tasting,  when I make mine in camp I start with about a cup of water to which I add a pinch of salt, black pepper, a pat of margarine,  a shake of dried onion bits (or powder),  and a heaping table spoon full of powdered milk,  I let that come to a simmer then take it off the heat and add the instant potatoes and stir it up,  then cover and let it set for a few minutes,  give it another stir and adjust for texture if needed.
 A lot of folks just use water and a little salt and they end up with a bland mushy paste,  but done my way they are almost as good as the real thing.

  BTW,  not to sound untraveled  :),  what is Chili Tuna ? 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Yeoman on November 13, 2013, 10:43:35 AM
I like your potato recipe Moe. I don't mind instant potatos but I'm sure I'd prefer them more if they were like yours.
As for the chili tuna, you're not untravelled; I'd never seen them before this past weekend. Its just a little tiny can of tuna packed with some chili peppers in the oil. It's quite spicey. There are a whole variety of flavours now. It's like what they did with sardines and kippers 25 years ago to make them more marketable.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: kanukkarhu on November 13, 2013, 05:19:57 PM
Fish in a can... Mmmmm!

I like kippers, sardines, tuna etc., but haven't tried many warm recipes with it. - especially outside. But once, a couple from Indonesia made something wrapped in banana leaves that was essentially tuna in coconut milk flavoured rice. It was warm. And spicy. And it was A-mazzzzing! Never had a warm dish with tuna since that was its equal.

"Tuna noodle casserole, avec kd" is about the extent of my warm tuna repertoire.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on November 13, 2013, 05:37:09 PM
I like your potato recipe Moe. I don't mind instant potatos but I'm sure I'd prefer them more if they were like yours.
As for the chili tuna, you're not untravelled; I'd never seen them before this past weekend. Its just a little tiny can of tuna packed with some chili peppers in the oil. It's quite spicey. There are a whole variety of flavours now. It's like what they did with sardines and kippers 25 years ago to make them more marketable.

  LOL, thanks Yeoman,  I was trying to picture tunafish swimming in a pool of Mexican Chili,  and I just couldn't wrap my head around that.   :rofl: :cheers:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 04, 2014, 08:59:26 AM
 
  Pancakes,   whether at home or in camp they are a quick, easy, and filling meal,  the makings carry well especially if you have the mix with water kind.

  (Personally I prefer to prepare my own by mixing the ingredients myself,   I've had the packaged stuff and some of it is great,  but I'm one of those guys who likes to control what goes into my food as much as possible,  I have some kind of sensitivity to some of those additives that go into prepared packaged food products,  you know,  the ones that are listed on the ingredients label that you can't pronounce the names of  :),   I even get bothered when I eat out sometimes.)

  Any who,  how I mix the batter is pretty much routine,  I like to use Bisquick baking mix,  I add a pinch of salt to taste,  eggs,  milk,  and a little melted butter,  what makes mine different (and better for my taste) is that I add stone ground corn meal to the dry mix,   then add the liquid and fold it all together (I don't beat the lumps out,  it overworks the flour) and let it stand for about five minutes or so before grilling.

  How much corn meal to flour that you use is up to your personal taste,  I've found that 2/3 baking mix and 1/3 corn meal works good for me.

  If you've never tried it,  give it a try, you might like it,  I also add stone ground corn meal to my Bannock and biscuit batter.   
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on May 04, 2014, 10:44:01 AM
I don't know if it's been mentioned before, or not, but I came up with the obvious solution to field expedient recipes that call for milk.
The ratio for making milk out of powdered milk is basically 4:1 (1 cup water + 1/4 cup powder = just a tad over 1 cup "milk".
So when I make up biscuit or pancake dry mix from camping, I add powdered milk in proportion to how much milk is required for the batch, and then just substitute water for milk in the field.
The math is pretty simple when you break it down into Tablespoons.  I have one recipe that makes a dozen baking powder biscuits. It calls for 3/4 cu milk. 3/4 cu = 12 Tbs, so I put 3 Tbs of powdered milk in the dry mix, and eventually add the 3/4 cu water when I mix it up at the campsite.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on May 04, 2014, 11:01:18 AM
........or you could use THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL recipe 8)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 04, 2014, 12:48:39 PM

  OP,  I do use powdered milk from time to time,  but I add it into the baking mix or mix it with water as I need it,  I've found that if it's mixed into the baking mix ahead of time it has a tendency to separate because the milk powder weighs less than the flour in the baking mix,  other times I carry evaporated milk,  I use it in my coffee as a substitute for 1/2 & 1/2,  mixed with water it works well in place of milk.

  Wolfy,  when we were car camping with the kids every other weekend I went through a lot of baking mix,  back then I mixed my own as you suggest,  but now it's just the two of us or I solo camp,  so a large box of Bisquick will last me at least a month using it for home and on the trail,  I find it's easier to just buy it already mixed,  and the difference price wise isn't all that much different,  a large box of Bisquick is close to 4 pounds and costs just under $5.00,  a five pound bag of flour is close to $4.00 and when you add the cost of the salt, baking powder, and lard to make the mix you aren't too far off.
  Now if I was using enough to buy the flour and other stuff in bulk there would be a good savings,  my problem is that it would go bad or get bugs before I got to use it all.

  That said,  what to think about trying the corn meal ? 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on May 04, 2014, 12:55:18 PM
If I have it mixed up, I always use a cup of it in my cornbread when we're baking in the Dutch oven on camping trips......seems to make the texture of the cornbread less 'crumbly' :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 04, 2014, 01:02:18 PM
If I have it mixed up, I always use a cup of it in my cornbread when we're baking in the Dutch oven on camping trips......seems to make the texture of the cornbread less 'crumbly' :thumbsup:

  Use what ?,  baking mix in your cornbread ?
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on May 04, 2014, 01:34:39 PM
Yup :drool:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 04, 2014, 01:51:11 PM
Yup :drool:

   How about drifting down to the new Cornbread Recipe thread and giving us your recipe.    :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on May 04, 2014, 02:52:56 PM
Yup :drool:

   How about drifting down to the new Cornbread Recipe thread and giving us your recipe.    :thumbsup:
I just asked Heather what we used for a recipe.  She said :shrug: "I don't know that we ever had one."   As I recall, we used a couple of cups of baking mix, added maybe a half cup of corn meal, a couple of eggs, some milk, maybe a little sugar, poured it into the preheated Dutch oven & baked it until the top was nice & brown.  Tasted good to us. ???
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 04, 2014, 03:51:44 PM
 
  My recipe..........

                              1-1/2 cups of Stone ground yellow cornmeal.
                              1-1/2 cups of All Purpose unbleached white flour.
                              1- tsp. course salt.
                              3- tsp. of double acting baking powder.
                              1/2 - of sugar.
                              1/4 -cup of melted butter.
                              1-1/4 cups of milk.
                              1- large egg (beaten)

    *preheat oven to 425*F.  (put cast iron skillet in the oven when the oven is cold and let it come to temp.)

                               Mix all the ingredients in a bowl  (don't over beat the batter,  some lumps are OK ).
         
    * when the oven beeps take out the skillet and butter it well,  pour the batter in and put it back in the oven.

                               Bake for 20 ~ 25 minutes and check with toothpick,  if it comes out clean it's done.

   My wife loves it warm out of the oven for breakfast topped with apple sauce or strawberry jam.

    * If you have leftover cornbread after a couple of days,  beat a few eggs,  add a teaspoon of vanilla extract, 1/4 cup of sugar,  and 1-1/2 cups of milk,  beat and pour over crumbed cornbread,  bake in a water bath at 350*F.  for 30 minutes (until it's loosely set up),  take it out, let it cool,  makes a great cornbread pudding. 
                               
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on May 04, 2014, 04:24:10 PM
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why do most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on May 04, 2014, 04:26:48 PM
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on May 04, 2014, 04:29:07 PM
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[

Huh?  1/3 of a tablespoon is 1 teaspoon. 3 tsp = 1 Tbs. And measuring once is more accurate that measuring 3 times for the same volume.
You lost me, Wolfy.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: wolfy on May 04, 2014, 04:35:18 PM
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[

Huh?  1/3 of a tablespoon is 1 teaspoon. 3 tsp = 1 Tbs. And measuring once is more accurate that measuring 3 times for the same volume.
You lost me, Wolfy.
If you didn't like that one, how 'bout this.........In the their zeal to eliminate extra weight in their backpacks, ultralight backpacking zealots carry only the smallest spoon in the set that is practical to eat with and still cover all the bases. :shrug:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 05, 2014, 04:58:32 AM
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[

Huh?  1/3 of a tablespoon is 1 teaspoon. 3 tsp = 1 Tbs. And measuring once is more accurate that measuring 3 times for the same volume.
You lost me, Wolfy.

  Jeeze guys,   it's six of one, or half a dozen of the other,  or,  3 of one and 1/4 0f the other,  it's three little teaspoons,   get to that measure any way it pleases you,   hell,  who even checks to make sure their measures are accurate in the first place.
  It would be interesting to see just how many people don't even own a set of measuring spoons,  one couple we know uses a tea spoon,  a soup spoon,  and a coffee cup as measures,  they just guesstimate for in between measures,  which is probably why their coffee sucks.        :lol:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on May 05, 2014, 07:46:08 AM
...
  Jeeze guys,   it's six of one, or half a dozen of the other,  or,  3 of one and 1/4 0f the other,  it's three little teaspoons,   get to that measure any way it pleases you,  ...
That's why I said it was a rhetorical question. Who cares? But it's just one of the little things I always notice. Like a recipe that calls for "4 Tbs" instead of 1/4 cu.  Or people who always say "have to" instead of "need to".  :lol:
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Moe M. on May 05, 2014, 01:21:37 PM
...
  Jeeze guys,   it's six of one, or half a dozen of the other,  or,  3 of one and 1/4 0f the other,  it's three little teaspoons,   get to that measure any way it pleases you,  ...
That's why I said it was a rhetorical question. Who cares? But it's just one of the little things I always notice. Like a recipe that calls for "4 Tbs" instead of 1/4 cu.  Or people who always say "have to" instead of "need to".  :lol:

  I know what you're saying and I agree,  it would be a much more simple world, especially for old guys like us if the academics didn't feel a need to complicate everything they get close to,  for some reason they thing that every problem can be solved by turning it into a Math equation.
  Combine that thinking with "new speak" (the art of talking faster than the human ear and mind can understand), and you find yourself in a constant state of saying "What",   what really makes me pause is when I read a recipe then go to the directions and find that one or more ingredients have either been added or omitted either in the list of ingredients or in the directions.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Old Philosopher on May 05, 2014, 01:43:18 PM
...
  Combine that thinking with "new speak" (the art of talking faster than the human ear and mind can understand), and you find yourself in a constant state of saying "What",   what really makes me pause is when I read a recipe then go to the directions and find that one or more ingredients have either been added or omitted either in the list of ingredients or in the directions.
That is especially evident in broadcasting, where the narrator has to get 5 minutes worth of disclaimers jammed into a 15 second commercial.  :P

Ah, yes...the 'mystery ingredient'.  I know it well. What really drives me nuts is the person writing the directions who is semi-literate and can't organize their thoughts, and the editor who doesn't see anything wrong with it.
For people who are used to cooking, and know how stuff is supposed to go together, it's not so bad. But for new cooks who rely upon recipes, it can spell disaster when they get all the ingredients in the bowl, and then find out at the bottom of the directions that there were supposed to combine the liquids and dry ingredients in separate bowls before mixing them. Arrrggghhh!
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: diogenes on July 12, 2014, 05:08:08 PM
I've been making this as a quick snack for years and after having some just now I realized that it'd make for pretty good trail fare.

Garbanzo Beans & Tuna Salad

This is a very simple Italian dish (ceci con il tonno) that can be altered/ added to very easily. The basic recipe is this:

1 can garbanzo beans, drained
1 can tuna, drained
salad dressing (I make my own, but store bought Italian dressing should be fine)
salt & pepper

Just toss the ingredients together and it's ready to eat. Usually with some bread or crackers. For trail eats I'd keep it pretty basic but when I make it at home I usually throw some minced garlic & chili flakes in it and maybe some fresh parsley and chopped scallions. I just had it with pine nuts in it too. Delicious.  8)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: TN Griller on July 30, 2014, 06:08:44 AM
diogenes, your garbanzo beans and tuna salad is indeed good eating. I like mine with lemon pepper seasoning.
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: diogenes on July 30, 2014, 07:25:02 AM
diogenes, your garbanzo beans and tuna salad is indeed good eating. I like mine with lemon pepper seasoning.

Thanks! That sounds great.   :)
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Orbean on February 21, 2015, 07:19:51 PM
I have my staples ; white chocolate peanut butter, dried cherries with peanut m&ms, emergen-c pack, and an assortment of granola/fruit/energy bars. I am a huge fan of an instant full cream milk powder called NIDO it is a nestle product. I purchase it from a middle eastern grocery store. It tastes so much better than the low fat instant milk. I drink lot of hot herb tea when camping in the colder weather.
Title: My new Bannock recipe
Post by: Moe M. on July 02, 2016, 08:26:17 AM

 I often make bannock while in camp instead of packing bread that has a tendency of getting mould pretty quickly in humid weather,  the problem I have with bannock is that most recipes call for simple ingredients like flour, baking powder, a pinch of salt, and water,  and what you get if you don't burn it is a facsimile of pretty bland primitive bread.
 Yes, I know that it's a primitive food,  but my tastes seem to have gotten allot more sophisticated over time from that of my early ancestors,  so I decided to go on a quest to find a more palate pleasing "Bannock" recipe.
 What I found was several ideas that got me experimenting with different ingredients and this is what I came up with that is easy to make ahead of time and keeps well in storage and transit.

 Bannock Mix (I tried to break it down into parts to make it easier than measurement).

   You can use any unit of measure you please,  mine is based on 1/4 cup per part.

   2 parts Quaker inst. oatmeal.
   2 parts Bisquick baking mix or equivalent.
   1 part brown sugar.
   1/2- tsp. salt.
   2 tsp. baking powder.
   1/4- tsp. of crushed black pepper.
   1/4- tsp. of dried thyme.
   Water enough to make a loose dough.

    I ran the oatmeal through my small food processor,  you could also use a coffee grinder,  just to break it down to a smaller texture,  it doesn't have to be powder.

    * Mix all the dry ingredients in a zip lock bag and store,  when ready to bake your Bannock take out what you need and mix it with just enough water to make a loose dough,  and bake it like you normally would,  at home I bake it in my oven at 400*f. for 20 minutes.
  In camp I usually wrap it on a debarked stick or make a thin loaf on a small plank cut from pine or cedar and placed by the fire to slow bake.

   When it's done it tastes kind of like a fluffy oatmeal cookie.    :banana:

   PS,  if you happen to have any bacon fat left from frying your bacon, a couple of Table spoons full mixed into the dough adds another layer of flavor.

  Enjoy
 
 
Title: Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
Post by: Quenchcrack on July 02, 2016, 09:47:40 AM
Not peeled potatoes baked in hot ash. I'm used to pull them out before they are cooked, make a hole in each and fill it with raw egg. Then I put them for a moment back into hot ash. Seasoned just with salt and pepper. It's tasty and filling meal. Remains of mass, hollowed out from potatoes can be used into stew or soup.


We did this OFTEN when I was in college.  Just toss the spuds into the hot ashes, open a can of beans and put the can in the ashes, too.  When all is done, cut the spud in half, top with beans.  Chile works well for this too.