Author Topic: The Kukri enigma  (Read 324 times)

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Offline upnorth

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The Kukri enigma
« on: August 15, 2017, 12:19:36 PM »
Sorry, but I really don't know were Kukri's fit on the knife/hatchet spectrum. Other than a few manufacturers pieces, Ka-Bar etc., decades ago.... this is my first ''real'' Kukri. I had no real demands from my first, other than it be big/tough/useful for wood processing/fire making. So in this regard my choice came out well. I grabbed this thing early winter last year. Sharpened it up enough to be useful, then took it to the edge of town one night. Made a fire, then packed it away for 3/4 of a year. I pulled it out of the tub yesterday.

My initial impressions still stand. It is a big, but not huge piece. The weight feels fine to me, it's not an irritating boat anchor in hand. The balance point is about an inch forward of the Cho, or that little cut out doohickie near the grip on the cutting edge. The tool feels basically neutral to slightly blade forward in balance, but almost imperceptibly so, I'm fine with it. The grips are very hand filling even for an XL glove. And I am considering the sanding down of the sides to narrow the grip out a tiny bit. I don't totally care for the hoe handle feel. Overall, just pulling it out and using it, no outstanding irritating flaws stand out. It is a big, thick and robust tool.There was enough grip room even for a large hand in leather gauntlets, or mitts. The spine was semi rounded off, no real sharp edges, and it tossed so/so sparks off a fire steel, out of the box. I ended up using my Speedy Sharp to ignite the natural local materials, grass etc. for the fire.

Chopping wrist thick dead wood was not a problem (Manitoba Maple I believe). Chips flew similar to one of my smaller hatchets. I haven't even put it on a belt to hump around with yet. I did swipe fire carbon all over it before I left as I hated the bright cream sheath cover. And, the sheath....The tool itself rattles around in it a little, but the kukri is so long that drop loss from the sheath is not a concern to me. The belt loop of the rawhide? is quite long and wide to accommodate pretty much any belt. And as you see it came with the traditional tiny, skinning ?, knife and sharpening tool set.

This thing was kind of a spontaneous buy out of curiosity. I believe that it was a bit over 100 Canuck bucks with shipping, which only took about 10 days or so I believe. When it arrived I saw that the handle by the base of the grip had a wood chip busted out and glued back into it. I don't care, and it will be an interesting test of their glue over time, use, and the cold, to see its retention. B.T.W., the blade was anything but sharp when I got it.

I am keenly aware of how amateurish this review is, because I read them. What is its overall weight ?, etc. I understand.... These are just my impressions of a tool that I bought spontaneously then forgot about, but actually kind of like, on second handling. I also wanted to make use of some of the pics I took of this thing late last year. It's called a British Gurka operation Iraqi Freedom Gripper Blocker, or whatever.

Here are a few specs from a site:

 Authentic Hand Forged khukuri Blades directly from Official Supplier to the Gurkhas in Nepal

Handmade by "Bishwakarmas" (Born khukuri Makers) using the top quality materials in a very traditional way with predictable tools

10" Blade with 5" Rosewood handle, Overall length 15 Inches, Thickness about 9mm at Spine

Unolished blade, sharp edge, Full tang rosewood Blocker Gripper handle, Refine Buffalo leather sheath
Razor Sharp blade, Easy to sharp, Balance water tempered.







« Last Edit: August 15, 2017, 12:24:55 PM by upnorth »

Offline wsdstan

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2017, 01:50:51 PM »
Nice pics.  Never owned one of those and never seen one being used.  They look like they would be good for batoning and taking off small limbs and shoots.
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Offline madmax

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2017, 02:40:31 PM »
Down here in most of FL they are the $h1t.  But they are heavy and can separate digits and extremities in short order if you get lackadaisical with them.  I have several including a custom monster from Crashdive123. 


"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2017, 03:23:58 PM »
I believe I read somewhere in the distant past that it was a belief, custom or unwritten law that each time one of these beasts was unsheathed it was required to 'draw blood' or bad karma would descend upon the owner.  Supposedly, that is what that little notched-out blade portion is back near the choil....the owner could nick his own finger with that little dude to avoid any bad luck.  That may be true or utter nonsense, I don't know.........take your pick. :shrug:

I enjoyed your report, BTW! :thumbsup: :cheers:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2017, 03:39:57 PM »
Nice!  A bit smaller than I'm used to seeing, but it's certainly the genuine article.
The more I understand, the less I know. Pretty soon I'll understand everything, and know nothing.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2017, 05:06:56 PM »
I think that drawing blood or bad karma comes along was the Gurkha soldiers of Nepal who used these knives.  Here is a link to that soldier and their knives.  There is a picture a little ways down of a fancy one.

http://www.eliteukforces.info/gurkhas/
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline upnorth

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2017, 12:44:18 PM »
Nice pics.  Never owned one of those and never seen one being used.  They look like they would be good for batoning and taking off small limbs and shoots.

Thanks. I'm taking it out this fall to make it pay for itself.

Offline upnorth

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2017, 12:47:02 PM »
Down here in most of FL they are the $h1t.  But they are heavy and can separate digits and extremities in short order if you get lackadaisical with them.  I have several including a custom monster from Crashdive123.

Thanks for the heads up Max. I'll use my axe/hatchet precautions with this tool.

Offline upnorth

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2017, 12:50:18 PM »
I believe I read somewhere in the distant past that it was a belief, custom or unwritten law that each time one of these beasts was unsheathed it was required to 'draw blood' or bad karma would descend upon the owner.  Supposedly, that is what that little notched-out blade portion is back near the choil....the owner could nick his own finger with that little dude to avoid any bad luck.  That may be true or utter nonsense, I don't know.........take your pick. :shrug:

I enjoyed your report, BTW! :thumbsup: :cheers:

Thanks Wolfy. I am an amateur hobbyist and come from that view point. I have a Jones to hack up a bunch of fire wood with this beast.

Offline upnorth

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2017, 12:52:45 PM »
Nice!  A bit smaller than I'm used to seeing, but it's certainly the genuine article.

Cool, thanks. That shows my ignorance about Kuri's. I see it as kind of a handful. Part of me is still interested in Kukri variations. Who knows what winter may bring my way this year, lol.

Offline upnorth

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2017, 01:02:47 PM »
I think that drawing blood or bad karma comes along was the Gurkha soldiers of Nepal who used these knives.  Here is a link to that soldier and their knives.  There is a picture a little ways down of a fancy one.

http://www.eliteukforces.info/gurkhas/

Hmmmm, looks like the weapon oriented versions are longer and lighter? As long as this thing gets my tea or coffee fire going I'm a happy duck.
 ;)

Offline Homesteader

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Re: The Kukri enigma
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2017, 01:08:03 PM »
I have the Kbar version and I'm really not using it much. I find if I carry the Kbar kukri I still want an axe and a small knife such as my Morakniv and there's no point in having all three with me. It's not a matter of it being a bad blade but instead a personal preference (and I'm too old and weak to carry it  :P ).
We are not to expect to be translated from despotism to liberty in a featherbed.   - THOMAS JEFFERSON