Author Topic: Is it really worth it ?  (Read 575 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Is it really worth it ?
« on: September 29, 2017, 09:21:33 AM »
  I know we've had this discussion before on the knife threads,  custom knives vs. production knives,  some members (I'm one of them) prefer one over the other,  we have some very talented knife makers on this forum who offer beautiful as well as very functional high quality knives,  but hand made is usually expensive, it's not uncommon to see examples ranging from $150.00 ~ $250.00 dollars or more.
 The question presents itself every now and then, Are they really worth the price in a practical way,  or is it more a pride of ownership thing,  some say they are, others argue that they aren't,  and their opinions are not without merit, who can honestly argue that some of Moraknives HD models priced from about $25.00 upwards to just over $60.00 can't do the same job, and as well as that custom hand made knife costing four times as much can do ?
 So since we're in the Axes and tomahawk section, the question here is are higher priced axes selling for $100.00 or more worth the price when you can shop Ace Hardware, Walmart, or Home Depot and find hatchets and axes for $30.00 or less ?
 In my opinion the old saw that says "you get what you pay for" holds true, more so for axes than for knives,  and I'm exempting vintage hatchets and axes from this discussion, I'm only talking about those that can be purchased new in todays market place.
 This discussion gets even more involved when one considers that some US makers have been improving the quality of their offerings and increasing their prices accordingly,  some American makers are now challenging foreign makers like Gransfors Bruks, Whetterlings, and Hults Bruks,  but are they as good or as ergonomically comfortable to use ?
 I'll reserve my thoughts on that question after we get a discussion going.   
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2017, 10:21:43 AM »
  Much to my chagrin I have another thread going that kind of resembles this new one that I had completely forgot about, I should have surfed this section before posting a new thread,  but this new thread will I'm hoping be a bit more specific, my older thread was more general and included rescuing vintage axes,  this one is more about what's still being produced and sold new.
 In the old thread as in this one I questioned the difference between low priced big box store axes vs. the high priced offerings on the market,  Really Big Monkey brought up middle of the road quality and pricing,  which is a good point of discussion.
 A couple of makers, Council Tool and Snow and Nealey have been starting to offer higher end hatchets and axes that are kissing the $100.00 or more mark,  making them competitive price wise with Gransfors Bruks and Wetterlings.
 
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Offline Punty

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2017, 10:30:24 AM »
  The same question can be asked for firearms, for the record.

   I am a fan of a guy on youtube, Nutnfancy, and I think he makes a good case for this sort of question, which I will briefly summarize here.

   There are two kinds of cool.

First kind of cool = Does it work? Does it perform? Is it reliable? Is it durable?  Does it offer good value for the money?

Second kind of cool = Do you like it? Does it give you satisfaction and enjoyment when you use it? Do you just dig the way it looks, or feels? Does it turn you on in some way, say for craftsmanship, aesthetically? Does it represent something that turns you on, say in historical value, whether real or replicated? Maybe it has sentimental value? Maybe you like it just because it is different, odd, or unique?

   First kind of cool can be argued, but really it is for you, the user to decide.

  Second kind of cool cannot be argued. It either turns you on, or it doesn't. You may be toting around a 1980's Rambo knife with a hollow handle. No matter what anyone else says, maybe you liked Rambo as a kid. Maybe your dad gave it to you and he has since passed away. Maybe you just don't care about knives really, and you like it and think it's cool, and like using it. Bottom line, it makes you happy despite all of it's faults.

   Ideally, you can get both kinds of cool in the same item.

  A Mora knife and Estwing hatchet both, I think, inarguably meet the criteria for first kind of cool, they just get the job done and have great value. Noone can reasonably debate that.

  But, hey...maybe you have an old US made marine Kabar. It's not the ideal knife for bushcrafting, but it's just cool to use and talk about, to contemplate it's history while you carve feathersticks, or whatever. Maybe making feathersticks with a Mora is a task, but with your trusty old kabar, it's a joy. Same thing with your $300 custom handmade knife with super steel and antler grips. Do you need that to make freaking feather sticks? No, a $12 Mora will work just fine. But it's not fun with a Mora like it is with your $300 handmade blade. You can't show off a Mora and talk about it like that $300 blade.

  How do you argue the value of joy? You can't.

  So, if you want to spend $500 on a bushcraft knife that you don't really need, all you have to do is claim second kind of cool and the argument stops there. Noone can tell you what brings you joy and satisfaction, or whether you are getting your money's worth of satisfaction out of it. Only you can answer that.
If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2017, 01:26:19 PM »
Thanks for that, Punty.

Moe, since we're discounting vintage restorations, my venerable Kelly DB drops out of the equation, although it fits both Cool One and Cool Two.

I have a SB True Temper from the hardware store I bought back about ought-'68. It has a lot of miles on it, holds an edge...and it's the last choice of the entire family for processing firewood. It's far from my favorite, also.  But it fits Cool I.

My daughter bought another True Temper a couple years ago, in a Jersey pattern, used it on one camping trip and gave it to me. It hefts about 3 1/2 lbs. Since nobody is allowed to use my Kelly, it's the first choice now for poppin' rounds and splitting cord wood. It does a fair job on small kindling, due to its weight. The grind is shallower than the old SB, so it chops adequately, also.  Not my go-to ax, but because it was a gift, it's Cool II.

I have not had the privilege of using any of the high-end foreign jobs, so I can't make a legitimate comparison.

But I must go along with Punty, and Nutnfancy when they say "Is it worth it?" is up to the user. I like the use of the phrase "Does it turn you on?". If a person strips it back to the reason WHY it turns them on, we get closer to answering 'is it worth it?'. Peeling the onion even further, it would seem it either comes down to ego, or heart.  Pride in Ownership can come from either.  Is it 'braggin' rights', or nostalgia? 

Probably didn't come close to answering the question in the OP.  Oh, well...it was thought provoking.
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Offline xj35s

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2017, 03:06:53 PM »
I personally say no. I just can't get myself to spend the money. There have been some custom knives on here for sale at a real good price but I couldn't do it.  I'm happy with my cheap stuff. Schrade, Fiskars, Mora, and Garage sale specials. My x7 is still shaving sharp 5 years old. The dogs did chew the handle, so I am in the market for a new hatchet...
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Offline Keith H

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2017, 03:56:09 PM »
In my opinion no. I have a lot of years under my belt now, a lot of experience. I started off buying a variety of special classy looking knives, but when it came down to it they just did not do it for me. I carry three knives, a hunting/butcher knife, a short bladed legging knife as a back-up, & a friction bladed clasp knife that I made myself. For heavier work I carry a tomahawk/trade axe. I have lived off grid for most of my life, growing my own food & supplying meat for the table by hunting. I found a long time ago that no one knife will do all jobs efficiently, & a butcher knife is still the best blade to use for hunting.
Keith.
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Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2017, 05:47:00 PM »
Well said, Punty.  I have a GB small Forest Axe but it has become so expensive I hesitate to use it.  My CT Boys Axe is my favorite because it fits me and I can replace it for $30.  I polished all the paint off of it and put a fruitwood stain on the haft.  I like it.
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Offline upthecreek

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2017, 09:08:19 PM »
The price of quality tools is astonishing regardless of the field in which they are used. If you rely on a tool, price is secondary to its durability. If a cheap tool works, use it. If you demand more you will pay more. Status symbols have always been expensive. I have a pile of axes. Some are expensive and some are not. I don't justify owning them based on their price.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2017, 12:26:35 AM »
In my opinion no. I have a lot of years under my belt now, a lot of experience. I started off buying a variety of special classy looking knives, but when it came down to it they just did not do it for me. I carry three knives, a hunting/butcher knife, a short bladed legging knife as a back-up, & a friction bladed clasp knife that I made myself. For heavier work I carry a tomahawk/trade axe. I have lived off grid for most of my life, growing my own food & supplying meat for the table by hunting. I found a long time ago that no one knife will do all jobs efficiently, & a butcher knife is still the best blade to use for hunting.
Keith.

++1, Keith!
It's probably heresy to say this on a blades forum, but I notice how many brand names are dropped like falling rain. Since we're talking about axes, I have to say a brand name means much less to me than the pattern of the head, and its efficiency for the task at hand. I've also noticed that a lot of knives are presented as copies of styles used by woodslore legends (e.g., Kephart, Nesmook, etc.)

I think there is one class of knife that is valid, but ignored, and that's a "utility knife".  The name says it all. It's any knife that is not made for showing off, or bragging about what it cost. It's made to do what's asked of it, and do it well.  The same can be said for axes.

I have a few summers under my belt like Keith. If I saw two people in the woods, one with a shiny, unblemished GB, and the other with a bruised and battered True Temper or Tramantina ax, I'm afraid I'd make a snap decision on which owner had the most experience, and skill.
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Offline buzzacott

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2017, 12:33:01 AM »
Just like anything people spend their precious recreation time and dollars on there'll always be a market for top shelf, individually crafted, custom designed, quenched in unicorn urine steel tools with luxurious woolly mammoth leather sheaths. No doubt that the quality is there with these $500+ custom knives and axes, and it's none of my business what people spend their hard-earned cash on. Heck, I'm not a collector, but I tend to spend a lot of cash on vintage equipment, so I do get where folks are coming from when they have to have the best and greatest toys.

When it comes to me personally and the knives and other edged tools I use, I am pretty basic in my tastes - vintage workmanlike tools or new production variants of vintage workmanlike tools. I got all excited the other week when I purchased a new-production Sheffield-made, six inch traditional beef skinner. It cost all of A$35 (US$27) but each to their own. Everyone's tastes differ.

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Offline Punty

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2017, 07:44:35 AM »
Well said, Punty.  I have a GB small Forest Axe but it has become so expensive I hesitate to use it.  My CT Boys Axe is my favorite because it fits me and I can replace it for $30.  I polished all the paint off of it and put a fruitwood stain on the haft.  I like it.

  Yeah, this is what deterred me from buying myself a really nice handmade knife.  I settled on a pair of knives from Varusteleka, the smaller Jaakaripuukko with sheath, https://www.varusteleka.com/en/product/terava-jaakaripuukko-carbon-steel/56524, and as my large chopper the Skrama with sheath, https://www.varusteleka.com/en/product/terava-skrama-carbon-steel/30189.  I love them, they are good quality, look nice together, and both under $100 so I'm not afraid to use them or get them scuffed.

  Same with my axe....I would love a GB, a Wetterling, or a Hults Bruk, but I bought the Husqvarna  forest axe for $65, and couldn't be happier.  For me, the under $100 is key...more than that and I may want to baby my gear and not use it roughly.
If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
Ecclesiastes 10:10

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2017, 01:06:39 PM »
 When I started this thread I tried to be specific about what we would be discussing,  it wasn't to steer discussion in my favor,  It was because when we get into knives it much harder to find a metric for measuring price affecting quality,  there are quite a few inexpensive knives on the market that are (in my opinion) high quality yet inexpensive.
 I also tried to keep vintage axes out of the mix because again, it sidetracks the point of this thread,  I have vintage axes that I have rescued from flee markets and yard sales and rehandled that cost me very little in total but are every bit the equal and in some case better than some of the high priced axes on the market today.
 Maybe some back story will help,  For a lot of years my woods bumming was period trekking, my "axes" were Hawks or a Ft.Meggs axe, about the same time frame we lived in a log home that we built and we heated with wood, so full sized axes and splitting mauls were the order of the day,  we also did quite a bit of camping, mostly state forest camp grounds, my camping axe was a vintage Norlund Hudson Bay axe.
 When I retired from LE things change a little and I got into bushcrafting,  so I needed to rethink my gear (or so I thought), so I went out and bought a new hatchet, it cost me about $20.00 bucks at Ace Hardware, a Collins, the first axe that I had bought new in over thirty years,  1-1/4 pound head on a 14" handle and dull as a butter knife,  I striped off the paint and varnish,  put a good edge on it, and made a mask for it,  the first time I used it to chop seasoned fire wood the edge chipped and rolled and the handle was tiring to use, in short it was a true POS, made in Mexico.
 The next one I purchased was from Lowe's, a Kobalt (store name), another twenty dollar piece of Schitt, a friend of mine and I attended a three day bushcraft meet in NH, while there he let me borrow his Gransfors Bruks Wildlife hatchet,  I was sold and soon laid out $120.00 for a new one of my own,  a little while later I wanted a bigger hatchet, I looked at Hultafors, Husky, and Sthil axes at a local equipment store, I'm sure they were good quality axes, they were priced middle of the road between POS and expensive,  but they all felt clumsy and unbalanced,  so I bit the bullet and ordered a Gransfors Bruks Small Forest axe from LL Bean,  another winner.
 Since then I'm a believer in the buy once, cry once adage,  especially when it comes to buying new axes.     
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Offline Unknown

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2017, 01:09:15 PM »
I read the product details on your knife Punty. Sounds good and looks cool. I like it.

Of course price comes into play when tooling up. I like hand tools a lot and enjoy using them most of the time. However I don't see myself buying any big box axe.

The vintage market is full of similar tools in most of the USA. So other that emergency convenience there's not many scenarios that would require me to purchase one.

In the speciality market it's a little different. Carving axes, broad axes, adzes and such I think there are choices often better than trying to find something old. Lamnia had Wetterlings double bevel broad axe for 135 bucks.i hesitated and it went out of stock about a year ago. Same thing happened with GB Swedish carver.
I'm not sure what's going on with these companies but the variety of former days appears diminished.

Offline Punty

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2017, 04:43:51 PM »
  Not really on point, but related. I discovered that the "palm to pit" rule for the proper handle length for an axe just doesn't work for me. In use, it just feels short. I can use an axe with that length, but one of the things I like about my Husky, is that the handle is "too long" by common wisdom standards.
 
  You know, that bushcrafty axes tend to handles that are around 20 inches in length.  For whatever reason, that feels awkward to me. My Husqvarna has a 26 inch handle that feels perfect. I actually have an old wetterling hatchet that I found at a yard sale that someone glued a cheap, varnished hammer handle into it. Jeezus....  Anyway, I rehandled it with a 19 inch handle. That's my hatchet. I just prefer longer handles.

   That's something to consider when buying, I guess.

  Incidentally, Husqvarna axes are made by Hults Bruk, but not finished very well. You have to put a little elbow grease into them.
If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2017, 04:51:11 PM »
To answer the OP directly...no, they are not worth the price...at least not to me.
I'm a simple man. The last new ax that's come into my possession in over 45 years was the gift from my daughter, which most here would consider a notch above a club.
I use an ax a lot, but only for processing firewood for the wood stoves a few months out of the year.
My old True Temper was my camp mate for about a decade. Again, only used to split cord wood. We'd find a dead-fall, or leaning dead tree and dismember it with a buck saw. The same saw cut it to length, and then it was time to split it.

When it was time to upgrade, I could have bought a $200, top-of-the-line felling ax.  A chainsaw cost $250. The chainsaw won.

This year my Kelly DB (sorry...rescued, not bought) will be processing kindling only. I just finished splitting 4 1/2 cords of firewood and didn't raise an ax. New electric logsplitter.  I'm in love!

Yes, I'm lazy and always have been.  :rolleyes:

Some people collect stamps, others collect model trains, others still collect axes. More power to them all!

So, for me to consider buying an expensive ax would be frivolous. I just don't have a need for something extravagant these days.

A not-so-side-story:  I started SCUBA diving 15 years after the Aqua-Lung was invented. Within a year, I was working in a dive shop and giving lessons. Then I got into light salvage work.  Operative word is "work".  I loved diving. I wanted to become a marine biologist. By the end of three years, I dreaded the thought of even getting wet again.  THAT'S how I feel about processing wood now.

I go into the woods to relax, and commune with Nature, not work. And the less work involved in staying warm, the better, IMHO.
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Offline upthecreek

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2017, 05:18:47 PM »
Moe, I'm not sure if you are looking for support for your purchase of a quality axe or help with justification. I have a 400$ double that I used today within arm shot of the chair I'm sitting in now. I'm fortunate to be able to own it and feel no reservation about using it. It works great. Tomorrow, I'm going to finish some cleaning along the south side of my house and will use a True Temper boys axe for most of it and a Wetterlings 32H for the rest of the project. I might sell ya all 3 for 800$ if you're interested. You will have to figure out for yourself, by using them, if it worth it. Vintage varieties offer superb performance. You need the knowledge to restore them which I'm sure you possess. Value is in the opinion of the purchaser, not the arm chair analyst.
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Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2017, 06:14:07 PM »
When I bought my GB axe I paid $69.00 for it.  I have used it to cut Kudzu vines 4" thick and hickory and pine firewood.  It is not worth the $198.00 they get for them now.  They don't cut any better now than they did 10 years ago.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2017, 06:19:23 PM »
I own 3 commercial axes.....all made by Plumb.  My very first was a hatchet-sized Plumb that my parents gave me when I entered Boy Scouts.  It's exactly like the official B.S.A. model....except for the $5 logo that Plumb stamped in the side of the poll for sale in the Scout catalog.  It was, and still is a very nicely designed tool that has always given me good service.  It seemed like a 'top of the line' brand at that time because I wasn't aware of any other 'name brands' that were better.

My second axe was also made by Plumb because I always liked the way the first one performed in comparison to some of the hatchets my buddies owned.  It's a half-axe, boy's axe or whatever other name they hang on them these days.  It is a very good $15 tool that's had lots of use and was carried over many a portage trail in the canoe country of Minnesota and Canada.  It's still being used and has the original red-stained hickory handle with the 'Permabond' epoxy that seals the head to the handle.

My third Plumb is a full-sized double-bit that is my work axe.  I profiled it with a choice of differentialy profiled sides for chopping or splitting.  It works just like it's supposed to.  :thumbsup:

The only axe I own that is not stamped 'Plumb' is my REAL workhorse.  It was FREE....found in the middle of a gravel road. :banana:   It's been used to chop steel drums in half, remove portions of body panels from a '67 VW bus, cut steel cable, cut barbed wire and trim cinderblocks to a more usable size.  It probably needs a new handle, but so far the electrical tape works on the handle-splits and the nails and screws keep the head from flying off. :chopwood: :lol:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2017, 08:21:21 AM »
Like some of you my axes are mostly American brands, some of which are no longer made.  I use them for splitting kindling or limbing a fallen tree.  Not much else.  I wouldn't know the difference between a $200 axe and the one Wolfy found in the road as far as performance goes.  I use a Plumb that has the original handle with a big glob or epoxy attached to the bottom handle right behind the head so that I don't keep damaging the handle when I overreach the target.  It has worked that way since 1973, the year I bought a Stihl Wood Boss chain saw.  With those two tools I cut enough firewood to keep our wood stove going for a several years.

Today I live on a small farm and cut trees that die or are diseased or victims of the wind.  I use a chain saw and split with a hydraulic splitter.  I still use one of several axes to split kindling but that is about it.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2017, 11:46:31 PM »
I own 3 commercial axes.....all made by Plumb.  My very first was a hatchet-sized Plumb that my parents gave me when I entered Boy Scouts.  It's exactly like the official B.S.A. model....except for the $5 logo that Plumb stamped in the side of the poll for sale in the Scout catalog.  It was, and still is a very nicely designed tool that has always given me good service.  It seemed like a 'top of the line' brand at that time because I wasn't aware of any other 'name brands' that were better.

My second axe was also made by Plumb because I always liked the way the first one performed in comparison to some of the hatchets my buddies owned.  It's a half-axe, boy's axe or whatever other name they hang on them these days.  It is a very good $15 tool that's had lots of use and was carried over many a portage trail in the canoe country of Minnesota and Canada.  It's still being used and has the original red-stained hickory handle with the 'Permabond' epoxy that seals the head to the handle.

My third Plumb is a full-sized double-bit that is my work axe.  I profiled it with a choice of differentialy profiled sides for chopping or splitting.  It works just like it's supposed to.  :thumbsup:

The only axe I own that is not stamped 'Plumb' is my REAL workhorse.  It was FREE....found in the middle of a gravel road. :banana:   It's been used to chop steel drums in half, remove portions of body panels from a '67 VW bus, cut steel cable, cut barbed wire and trim cinderblocks to a more usable size.  It probably needs a new handle, but so far the electrical tape works on the handle-splits and the nails and screws keep the head from flying off. :chopwood: :lol:

Like some of you my axes are mostly American brands, some of which are no longer made.  I use them for splitting kindling or limbing a fallen tree.  Not much else.  I wouldn't know the difference between a $200 axe and the one Wolfy found in the road as far as performance goes.  I use a Plumb that has the original handle with a big glob or epoxy attached to the bottom handle right behind the head so that I don't keep damaging the handle when I overreach the target.  It has worked that way since 1973, the year I bought a Stihl Wood Boss chain saw.  With those two tools I cut enough firewood to keep our wood stove going for a several years.

Today I live on a small farm and cut trees that die or are diseased or victims of the wind.  I use a chain saw and split with a hydraulic splitter.  I still use one of several axes to split kindling but that is about it.

LOL! I'm glad to know I'm not the only freak around this campfire! Maybe it's a function of age?  :shrug:
You guys made my day!

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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2017, 08:16:39 AM »
Moe, I'm not sure if you are looking for support for your purchase of a quality axe or help with justification. I have a 400$ double that I used today within arm shot of the chair I'm sitting in now. I'm fortunate to be able to own it and feel no reservation about using it. It works great. Tomorrow, I'm going to finish some cleaning along the south side of my house and will use a True Temper boys axe for most of it and a Wetterlings 32H for the rest of the project. I might sell ya all 3 for 800$ if you're interested. You will have to figure out for yourself, by using them, if it worth it. Vintage varieties offer superb performance. You need the knowledge to restore them which I'm sure you possess. Value is in the opinion of the purchaser, not the arm chair analyst.

  'Creek,  I guess I'm not explaining myself correctly,  I'm not looking for support for my purchase nor justification,  and again, like you, I have high quality vintage axes that while not expensive when new and certainly not expensive when rescued are by anyone's standards high quality tools.
  I was asking about new axes, put simply,  the question was and still is, do you (the guy that actually uses his axes) think it's worth spending upwards of a $150.00 for a high quality working axe, or is an Ace Hardware Collins Axe or Lowe's Kobalt brand $25.00 axe good enough to meet your requirements.
 A couple of weeks ago while at my local Ace Hardware I stopped by the garden department to look at there replacement handles, rarely will you find a good one, but once in a great while you get lucky, while there a guy that looked to be in his mid thirties and dressed like an accountant on his day off, was hefting a couple of store brand axes and asked my opinion,  I told him he'd have better luck moving over to the Husky display,  but if he wanted a really good axe for a reasonable price he should try the Grafton Flee market and buy a vintage axe that's in good shape.
 My point is that he didn't know anything about axes,  and that seems to be the norm for most people today that haven't been brought up using tools, and that I believe is why manufacturers put out junk,  to most people today an axe is an axe,  to them a Collins made in Mexico selling for $25.00 is going to win out over the Husky selling for $50.00 bucks most of the time.
 IMHO the folks who frequent this forum know the difference, but the question still remains, are you satisfied with a low quality axe for cheap money or do you prefer an axe with better quality and are you willing to pay for that kind of quality ?
     
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Punty

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2017, 09:38:13 AM »
  I think I'd like to throw something else into the equation;

  "Expensive" axes tend to be better designed. "Cheap" axes tend to be what I would basically call a "wedge on a stick", which is probably adequate for most homeowners' needs, but may be clunky and awkward for a "woods person's" needs...regardless of quality of build. So, it;s not necessarily ONLY about quality of metal and tempering, for example.
If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
Ecclesiastes 10:10

Offline upthecreek

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Re: Is it really worth it ?
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2017, 04:10:42 PM »
Moe, my answer is yes.

Creek
Axes Rock!