Author Topic: Trail foods and camp cooking  (Read 51718 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Trail foods and camp cooking
« on: May 18, 2012, 08:43:14 AM »

  I was going to put this into the Just Recipes section as that seems to be stalled a little,  but on second thought most to the recipes in that section center around cooking on the BBQ grill,  smoking,  or in the home kitchen.
 What I'd like to discuss here are the meals that we prepare on the trail or in camp,  while we all use quicky prepared foods like Ramen Noddles,  Mountain House dried meals,  MRE's and the like,  I'd like to hear about the more inventive ways in which some of us cook healthy good tasting meals over a camp fire with backpacking cookware,  hobo pots or small mess kits.
 To get it started,  one of my favorites is beef stew,  since I usually cook for just myself (usually the friends that I camp with bring their own,  we might mix and match or share some stuff,  but generally cook for ourselves) taking along some fresh veggies and a frozen piece of beef or small bag of stew meat isn't much of a problem,  add a couple of cups of water and some granulated boullion,  a little salt and pepper in a small pot or canteen cup and your on your way to a good meal.
 Another favorite is campfire beans,  I use my mom's recipe for baked beans for the cooking liquid,  molasses, yellow mustard, brown sugar,  salt & pepper,  and put it in a medium canning jar,  in camp I soak the beans overnight,  the next morning I rinse them,  then cook up some bacon and use the drippings as a base for the beans,  I put the beans in a small pot with the bacon drippings,  add the flavoring liquid,  top off with water to cover the beans,  I bring it to a boil then move it just far enough from direct heat to get a slow simmer when covered.
 I let them slow simmer for four or five hours checking the water level once in a while,  when the beans are tender I take the cover off the pot,  as the liquid reduces the beans thicken up a bit,  the finished beans are almost as good as oven baked overnight. 
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2012, 09:18:22 AM »

We try all sorts of things, but prefer to grill food "skewer"/ "kabob" style. Many times we will cut up some venison/beef at home & bring it along with an onion & a green pepper or two. Or sometimes just bring a package of frozen venison/meat we have, & cut it as it thaws. Potatoes are a common addition too. We have also par-boiled some chicken at home & then freeze it & bring that to "finish" on the fire. Of course we also try to camp near fishing spots, ( which n Minn. is rather easy) so fresh fish for any meal is common. Fried in a pan, wrapped in green leaves/watercress or foil, or 'Planked/stick grilled ( can't remember the name of the method right now as it escapes me,but your put sticks thru the fish, binding it to a main "handle" stick.) Sometimes we dig a hole into a river bank, build a fire to coals, then put a light layer of dirt on coals & then wet watercress/grn leaves on the covered coals Then the cleaned fish, many times stuffed with wild leeks or even wintergreen or edibles like that, then more wet stuff, then cover with dirt & wait & fish some more. Then uncover later on & eat the cooked fish.. Good stuff.
 ;)
Many times early in our trips, when we still have bacon, eggs & sometimes cheese, we sometimes make "Omelets n a sack" for breakfast. We place 2 pieces of bacon into a paper bag, laid on the bottom, & add an egg on top of the bacon, & sometimes we add cheese or, our favorite ingredients, then fold sack down to close it, in about 1 inch folds, then skewer the folded part with a sharp stick. Hover over the coals (not fire/flames) for about 5-10 minutes & then eat the results. ( try it if ya haven't done it, it works. If ya don't let the sack too close to the coals)
 ;)
Bacon-cheese dogs are good too. Ya take a wiener slice it length wise not quite all the way thru & then stick lil pieces of cheese in the cut & then close. Wrap & bind with bacon spiraling around the wiener from one end to the other to hold in the cheese, & place lil whittled toothpick in thru the endsto hold the bacon on the wiener. Then skewer on a sharp stick & cook over flames or coals...
 :)


I have a lot more like the ones I wrote about, but I better wait & let some others post too.
If.. ya want more ideas of things "I/we" do for eating out in the sticks.
 :)
 I do not want to spoil others input, & ramble on....
I will say that we eat pretty good when we are out. & a lot of this stuff we do, is light & easy to carry in, rather than hauling a lot of cookware & gear. We try to use what is available "out there" that Nature provides ( & practice skills),more than depend on lots of stuff, unless we are truck/car camping, then worrying about toting things on our body, isn't any worry. Got some recipes/ideas for that type of camping too. As I said.. I don't want to spoil this for others.
 ;)
Great topic Moe! Thnx!
 :thumbsup:


 
« Last Edit: May 18, 2012, 09:24:40 AM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2012, 10:03:42 AM »

 Great post,  just what I was hoping for,  thank you.
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2012, 12:12:00 PM »
To share a few of my favorites:

bacon and eggs in a cast iron skillet

fried fish and hush puppies in a cast iron skillet

venison tenderloin (or venison steaks) and a baked potato.  The venison I like to sear on a log that's been burning for awhile and the potato you can wrap in foil and just put on the edge of the fire for 1-2 hours or so. 

All these are MUY BUENO at camp   :stir:
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2012, 12:37:55 PM »
I've rolled more stuff in tin foil and tossed it in the coals than I can remember.  A pretty common item is fruit (apple, pear or peach) cored and stuffed with raisins brown sugar and cinnamon.  Great treat.

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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2012, 09:03:56 PM »
I bought a small mess kit from Walmart.  I'd love to see some pictures or ideas on what to use with that tiny set.    I have this feeling foods are going to stick quite badly.

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Forest Turtle

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2012, 02:53:42 AM »
Not peeled potatoes baked in hot ash. I'm used to pull them out before they are cooked, make a hole in each and fill it with raw egg. Then I put them for a moment back into hot ash. Seasoned just with salt and pepper. It's tasty and filling meal. Remains of mass, hollowed out from potatoes can be used into stew or soup. 
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2012, 04:34:41 PM »
I bought a small mess kit from Walmart.  I'd love to see some pictures or ideas on what to use with that tiny set.    I have this feeling foods are going to stick quite badly.

WW.

  It depends on which mess kit you bought,  the hard annodized set they sell for about $25.00 is pretty good from what I've heard,  the thin aluminum "boy scout" type kits from Coleman and a few other brands that sell for anywhere between $5.00 and $10.00 dollars are sure to burn food and be hell to clean.
  Personally I'd suggest using Stainless Steel,  preferably the same or better quality as the USGI mess kit,  usually one can find good quality small used cookware at thrift shops that nest,  are easy to pack,  and priced cheap.
  Also if you can find a 5~6 inch cast iron skillet they are great for personal trail cooking,  combined with a small covered pot they make a fine minimalist kit.

  Last tip,  cook over low to moderate heat,  never on high heat unless you're just boiling water.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2012, 07:46:01 PM »
aack... I bought the 'cheap' one.    I've been shopping and shopping ...trying to find a good set.   I definately want a frypan that goes with it.   It seems its either all pots.. or just a fry pan for an average priced set.

I've seen that oval set (mess kit) , that one makes sense to me.

Ok guys. pop in some pictures.. we wanna see some grub cookin!    :)   

WW.
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Offline Forest Turtle

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2012, 01:35:13 AM »
Woods Woman, don't be disappointed, I have aluminium mess kit for long years and for cooking (can't say for frying too) it's good. I don't say "best," but it works well.


(illustration)
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 01:37:12 AM by Forest Turtle »
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2012, 03:46:38 PM »
Woods Woman, don't be disappointed, I have aluminium mess kit for long years and for cooking (can't say for frying too) it's good. I don't say "best," but it works well.


(illustration)

  I prefer Stainless over Aluminum because Stainless is nonreactive,  but there's a difference in quality when comparing cookware,  your set for example looks like it's made of thicker material than the cheapy Walmart Chinese Boy Scout type kit,  and most likely cooks very well,  trying to fry eggs, bacon, sear a steak, or pan fry fish in something in the thickness range of a beer can ain't going to get it done.
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Offline Forest Turtle

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2012, 04:22:09 PM »

I prefer Stainless over Aluminum because Stainless is nonreactive,  but there's a difference in quality when comparing cookware,  your set for example looks like it's made of thicker material than the cheap Walmart Chinese Boy Scout type kit,  and most likely cooks very well,  trying to fry eggs, bacon, sear a steak, or pan fry fish in something in the thickness range of a beer can ain't going to get it done.

Thanx for explanation, Moe M. I had never thinking about like this. And maybe there are differences between stainless kits too, because mine experiences were horrible. Food burned quicker than in aluminium kit. Aluminium is heated uniformly, not like stainless. But ordinary I don't sear steaks or fry fish on trails so you'll be right anyway.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 04:29:27 PM by Forest Turtle »
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2012, 06:02:02 PM »
Cooking using natural materials is less likely to burn any food, Unless ya aren't payin' attention, & when ya are done there is nothing to clean... Ya just burn yur stuff ya used to cook that Ma Nature provided, & make more "cookware/utensils, later, if ya need it..
 ;)



  What I'd like to discuss here are the meals that we prepare on the trail or in camp,  while we all use quicky prepared foods like Ramen Noddles,  Mountain House dried meals,  MRE's and the like,  I'd like to hear about the more inventive ways in which some of us cook healthy good tasting meals over a camp fire with backpacking cookware,  hobo pots or small mess kits.
 


The merits of different cookware & how it is used , I thought was a different topic.. Forgive me if I am wrong.
 :)


I like to have a Peanut butter & Jelly sandwich on Toasted bread before I go out to fish in the morning. It goes good with me coffee, tea or hot chocolate.. Only problem is that I don't want to make them in the morning...
So I make them over the fire the night before , If... not in bear country.
I use what they call a "Pie-iron"... I'll try to find a pic, or go take one of ours later. One of ours is square, & the other is round. They work good with pie fllings & even have beeen used for omelets & Beef stew... They are great to have if you are not packing them. Otherwise, ya have to use another, non - cookware/utensil method like "ash cake" or "bannock" style.
 :)
Anyone know what I am talking about... & have some other recipes?
 ;)

I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2012, 06:45:31 PM »
I know what your jabberin' about, MnS.......those little hinged 2-piece sandwich toasters that look like a pair of aluminum clay pigeons w/ long handles, right?    Ours are some my Dad passed down to me and he used to use them over the gas range burner flame to make a quick jelly-filled treat on a cold evening.  I've even seen cast iron versions, round ones and square ones, lined with Teflon (ours are unlined), and even one that had tube shaped interiors that would 3 tube-steaks at a time.  I have even seen a website devoted to recipes for them.......some of them pretty exotic and involved :)

I was wondering about the square ones.......do they seal the edges of the sandwich as well as the round ones?  I always felt it was a bit wasteful to have to trim away the excess bread sticking out past the edges of the round version, but it does seal the sandwich or pie filling inside the toasted bread very well 8) :fire2:


P.S.     Here's one...... http://www.pieiron.com/recipes.htm
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 06:50:00 PM by wolfy »
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #14 on: May 21, 2012, 06:58:49 PM »
I know what your jabberin' about, MnS.......those little hinged 2-piece sandwich toasters that look like a pair of aluminum clay pigeons w/ long handles, right?    Ours are some my Dad passed down to me and he used to use them over the gas range burner flame to make a quick jelly-filled treat on a cold evening.  I've even seen cast iron versions, round ones and square ones, lined with Teflon (ours are unlined), and even one that had tube shaped interiors that would 3 tube-steaks at a time.  I have even seen a website devoted to recipes for them.......some of them pretty exotic and involved :)

I was wondering about the square ones.......do they seal the edges of the sandwich as well as the round ones?  I always felt it was a bit wasteful to have to trim away the excess bread sticking out past the edges of the round version, but it does seal the sandwich or pie filling inside the toasted bread very well 8) :fire2:


P.S.     Here's one...... http://www.pieiron.com/recipes.htm


Ours are "un-lined" & yes you are describing exactly what I was talkin about. Yes the square ones work fine.. Actually, less waste if ya buy the square bread loaves. That link is about the same things. I am gonna try & take some pics.. Kids are fond of them. I luv em when we use em.


 :)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2012, 10:10:13 PM »
I have a pie iron!!  :)      I have this recipe of two cake mixes mixed and you just use a 1/3 cup with 3 Tbs. water to nuke in a bowl for a quick cake.   I've played with that idea to make brownies in the pie iron...  mmm.. nummy.

Apple pie is still the fave here tho.


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On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2012, 09:23:02 AM »

I prefer Stainless over Aluminum because Stainless is nonreactive,  but there's a difference in quality when comparing cookware,  your set for example looks like it's made of thicker material than the cheap Walmart Chinese Boy Scout type kit,  and most likely cooks very well,  trying to fry eggs, bacon, sear a steak, or pan fry fish in something in the thickness range of a beer can ain't going to get it done.

 


Thanx for explanation, Moe M. I had never thinking about like this. And maybe there are differences between stainless kits too, because mine experiences were horrible. Food burned quicker than in aluminium kit. Aluminium is heated uniformly, not like stainless. But ordinary I don't sear steaks or fry fish on trails so you'll be right anyway.

  Actually we are both right,  if you were to take a peek into the kitchen area of your favorite eatery you'd find thick aluminum and stainless steel cookware being used by those masters that prepare your favorite dishes,  you would also find very few of them that have burned food in them.
  The why is that they are quality cookware,  the aluminum is thick and conducts heat evenly,  the same for stainless, it has to be a minimum if 18/10 stainless to conduct heat for the proper preperation of food without burning it.
  That said,  eveything depends on the heat used under the pan or pot,  too much heat will burn food and have it sticking to the best of cookware,  I have a couple of friends who have GI mess kits just like mine,  they are always caked with burned bits on the bottoms,  and the guys are always complaining that they're junk only fit for burning good food,  I don't have that problem with mine,  I think they are the best designed and highest quality cook kits you can find.
  The difference between mine and there's is that it's mine,  I don't cook over flames,  I don't cook right on top of coals,  I don't cook over heat that's high enough to burn the oils that i'm cooking in. be it butter, bacon grease,  or olive oil,  once you burn the oils the food is next to burn and stick to the cookware,  it's that simple.

  I've cooked steak over a campfire using aluminum foil for a pan and it turned out great,  but given a choice I'd much rather have a cast iron grill skillet,  but much of the time I use my GI mess kit because it's a good compromise,  and it works.

  Control the heat and the food will cook itself quite well.

  I cook with a frying pan or skillet at least as often as I do on the grill top or in a pot,  that's one of the reasons I'm drawn to the GI mess kit,  throw in the canteen cup and cover and the cup stove and it's a perfect set,  for my needs anyway.
  I've seen other sets that are nice and of high quality,  I like the little nesting set that Walmart carries,  it a series of nesting pots with covers that are made of hard annodised aluminum,  but I'd be lost with a set like that,  who can survive with only cups and pots,  and no skillet,  surely not me.   :)
« Last Edit: May 22, 2012, 09:31:15 AM by Moe M. »
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2012, 09:36:42 AM »


  Control the heat and the food will cook itself quite well. < That's the key as far as I am concerned

 
  I've seen other sets that are nice and of high quality,  I like the little nesting set that Walmart carries,  it a series of nesting pots with covers that are made of hard annodised aluminum,  but I'd be lost with a set like that,  who can survive with only cups and pots,  and no skillet,  surely not me.   :)   I can, but I surely like to have a skillet if I can.. But I use nature(green sticks)  for making grills & skewers alot though.. LOL :)


Really great topic Moe M.!
I like it a lot!
 :D
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2012, 10:55:36 AM »


  Control the heat and the food will cook itself quite well. < That's the key as far as I am concerned

 
  I've seen other sets that are nice and of high quality,  I like the little nesting set that Walmart carries,  it a series of nesting pots with covers that are made of hard annodised aluminum,  but I'd be lost with a set like that,  who can survive with only cups and pots,  and no skillet,  surely not me.   :)   I can, but I surely like to have a skillet if I can.. But I use nature(green sticks)  for making grills & skewers alot though.. LOL :)


Really great topic Moe M.!
I like it a lot!
 :D

  Thanks,  I think it's interesting,  but I'm biased  :).

  It's also interesting to me what we as individuals get out of our outdoor experiences,  for some folks the views are the high,  for others it's the solitude,  some of us just love to sit by a fire a carve kurska's, spoons, and wood spirits.
  I enjoy the overall experience as much as anyone else,  but a big part of my camping pleasures come from a well designed fire and some good grub (not to be confused with Mad Max's wood grubs).
 Like you,  I enjoy roasting on a stick,  baking on a flat stone,  or broiling a nicely seasoned fish on a cedar plank,  but I also get a kick out of using small skillets and pots converted to campfire cooking to see how well they work.
 I been pleasantly surprised at just how well these mostly discarded pieces have performed over the expensive high tech wonder ware that is being marketed to backpackers and campers today.
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Offline Forest Turtle

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2012, 11:25:18 AM »
Skillet.. I don't have any. Me and my friends have on trails a "Silesia pan," replica of cookware that was used by ancient Slave nation which used to live in Central Europe. It can be used instead plate on top of the primitive oven or as a frying pan. Handle is usually carved on campsite. We have never burn food on it yet... basting every meal is worth needed. Bread cake baking (or bannock)is possible too.



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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2012, 01:54:28 PM »
Forest Turtle...     OH I want one of those!!  :)     I've been wanting what they call here a discus, wich is very simular but heavier than the one you show  by the looks of it.     

Umm...is that anchovies in with the eggs?   

And kidneys being fried up? 

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Forest Turtle

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2012, 02:16:20 PM »
WW: Silesian pan is great piece of kit, if cooking for all trip company is needed.

It is bacon with eggs for breakfast.. yummy! And chicken being fried up in bear sauce and chilli I believe. :-)
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #22 on: May 22, 2012, 04:55:17 PM »
Moe  M. ,



  Thanks,  I think it's interesting,  but I'm biased  :) .

  It's also interesting to me what we as individuals get out of our outdoor experiences,  for some folks the views are the high,  for others it's the solitude,  some of us just love to sit by a fire a carve kurska's, spoons, and wood spirits.

I agree, very interesting.. :)

  I enjoy the overall experience as much as anyone else,  but a big part of my camping pleasures come from a well designed fire and some good grub (not to be confused with Mad Max's wood grubs).


I can understand... we'll all give & take due to what we enjoy!
:)

 Like you,  I enjoy roasting on a stick,  baking on a flat stone,  or broiling a nicely seasoned fish on a cedar plank,  but I also get a kick out of using small skillets and pots converted to campfire cooking to see how well they work.


Over time... I reckon I will also. But at this time, I just enjoy using many of the thing Ma Nature provides, with a lil modification from "us". :D

 I been pleasantly surprised at just how well these mostly discarded pieces have performed over the expensive high tech wonder ware that is being marketed to backpackers and campers today.



 IMHO...I am "All for" using older "techniques/technologies"before moving on to the newer ones. 2 reasons... One is to be able to do things, without the new ones, first...("Walk" before "Run" thinking) & 2, is to be able to pass on the old things before they are forgotten because of the new stuff. I think ya know where I am goin with how I think..
:)


We agree Moe M., on much of what we aresein here in this topic.. I hope it continues.. Much good info gettng passed here!
 :thumbsup:
-----------------------------------------

Forest Turtle,
  That looks like a great "skillet"/ Piece of kit to carry. I am not sure ya would be familiar with what example I use here, but it reminds me of a "miners' pan", like they use to pan for gold in streams.
 :)


There ya go... more than one use.
 ;)


Thanx for showing me/us your "skillet"/Silesian pan, It is good thing to remember.
 :thumbsup:



I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2012, 07:43:31 AM »
Forest Turtle...     OH I want one of those!!  :)     I've been wanting what they call here a discus, wich is very simular but heavier than the one you show  by the looks of it.     

Umm...is that anchovies in with the eggs?   

And kidneys being fried up? 

WW.

  It's interesting how different people in different parts of the world adapt tools and other impliments needed in their every day lives that are so similar,  yet have likely never seen those of others.
 The pan in those pic's from Forrest Turtle is common to central Europe as she states,  yet it is very similar to the Paloli pans found in many Spanish and South American homes,  and it also resembles the shallow Woks found in much of Asian cooking.
 I reminds me a lot of a pan that drew my attention a while back when the game show 'Survival' first aired,  the contestants were given a fixed blade survival knife,  a pan similar to that of Forrest Turtle's, and a bag of rice to be used as rations to get them started in their new invironment.
 I thought at the time that it was pretty functional,  because of it's design it could be used to stir fry,  boil rice,  make soups and stews,  and it also could be used to make breads,  turned over it could be used as a make shift oven.
 I found that a pan of that design can be found in many Asian and Hispanic ethnic grocery and convienience stores for pretty cheap money,  most are nothing more than hand hamered forged sheet steel,  and that once seasoned,  cook almost as good as cast iron,  but at 1/4 the weight of cast iron.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2012, 08:14:43 AM »
I find them interesting too  Moe..    the way this one Forest Turtle is more shallow than my WOK I can see it being more 'packable'.   

My guess is that FT's pan was used for many thing other than just cooking.    Winnowing for one.   Mixing bread dough in.   Its shallow enough that yes.. like you said.. upside down its got uses too.     I've seen tortilla like breads lain on upside down woks to cook... 

I'd like to find one like Ft's ..    Or make one.  Any idea on how to go about that?  I have sheet metal here and could get more if I  need it.   

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #25 on: May 23, 2012, 08:58:21 AM »
I'd like to find one like Ft's ..    Or make one.  Any idea on how to go about that?  I have sheet metal here and could get more if I  need it.   

WW.

this instructional video might help (although it seems to be in German, it also uses another universal language)


If that doesn't look like enough fun, here's what I'd do.  I'd toss that sheet metal in a hot campfire and get it super hot.  While it's heating up, I'd find a large, smooth-ish rock to use as a sort of anvil or die.  Then I'd take the hot sheet metal, lay in on the rock, and pound the crap out of it with a mini sledge.  Move it over the rock in a circular sort of motion while you're pounding the crap out of it and forming it into a shallow wok-like shape.  My infomercial-bought wok (ca. 1993) has small hammer marks all over it, so I'll assume that's not an unreasonable finish.

After about an hour of heating and hammering, you'll probably be good to go.  Use an angle grinder to grind the edge into a circular shape.  Rectangle could work too I suppose.  Then I'd have to think there's some sort of heat treatment or tempering or something to be done.  That'll be the easy part though.  Then just season it like a regular wok.

This is all off the top of my head, with only a shade-tree tinkerer's knowledge of metalworking so take it with a grain of salt!  It's something I might try sometime though.  All I'd be out is a couple square feet of sheet metal and an afternoon in front of the fire with a hammer and a rock.

Sounds like an afternoon well spent, actually.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #26 on: May 23, 2012, 11:34:13 AM »
I find them interesting too  Moe..    the way this one Forest Turtle is more shallow than my WOK I can see it being more 'packable'.   

My guess is that FT's pan was used for many thing other than just cooking.    Winnowing for one.   Mixing bread dough in.   Its shallow enough that yes.. like you said.. upside down its got uses too.     I've seen tortilla like breads lain on upside down woks to cook... 

I'd like to find one like Ft's ..    Or make one.  Any idea on how to go about that?  I have sheet metal here and could get more if I  need it.   

WW.

  Off the top of my head WW I'd be thinking more about doing a search on the net to find a shallow Wok or Paolie pan,  if I couldn't find one,  my next step would be to get a steel Wok and cut it around the sides to the depth that I wanted then file or sand the cut edge smooth.
  One could do it pretty quickly with a cut off saw,  large metel snips or a good hack saw would take a bit longer but would still get it done
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Offline Forest Turtle

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2012, 12:36:43 PM »
Our ancestors were smart, so they made only versatile tools with many ways to use. At that time it was needed because Slavic tribes were nomadic until 6th century.

Silesian pan is about 30 cm in diameter and we usually cook in it meal for six people or so. For one person is too large and too heavy (it's about 4 millimetres thick). Besides cooking and frying it's good for digging holes for campfire or cooling hole for food (we usually travel on foot, no car fridge is near :-D). Pan can float - there isn't anything better as floating Silesian pan full of cheese and vegetables while you are enjoying cool water in hot day. ;)
And I'm sure there are many other ways to use.
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #28 on: May 24, 2012, 10:25:18 PM »
FT, you say the Silesian is 30 cm across and made of 4mm thick metal.  How deep is it?  That is the only other dimension needed to duplicate it, either by manufacturing one or finding a pan that is either the same dimensions or could be modified.  Thanks for sharing the pan and a little history with us!

Offline Forest Turtle

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #29 on: May 25, 2012, 01:34:21 AM »
OK, I measured one I have just at home. 30 cm in diameter, 2 mm thick, 3,5 cm deep. I was wrong, not 4 mm but 2 mm thick.  :-X
There is no way to happines, happines itself is the way. http://lesnizelva-galerie.blogspot.com

Half Axe

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2012, 06:54:52 PM »
Thanks, FT, for taking measurements off yours to share with everyone  :).

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #31 on: May 25, 2012, 09:27:45 PM »
Getting back to the topic.........

I have one of those oval-shaped GI mess kits.  I catch and fillet a mess of brook trout from a wilderness lake.  Use the oval-shaped frying pan from the mess kit to cook them over a camp fire in unsalted butter.  Use Old Bay to season to taste.  Never gets old.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2012, 05:41:40 AM »
cook them over a camp fire in unsalted butter.  Use Old Bay to season to taste.  Never gets old.
+1 good  stuff.
Making me hungry. Just got ta go troutfishing.Very soon...
:)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline easy_rider75

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2012, 09:37:22 AM »
I've rolled more stuff in tin foil and tossed it in the coals than I can remember.  A pretty common item is fruit (apple, pear or peach) cored and stuffed with raisins brown sugar and cinnamon.  Great treat.

Wolf

yep same here  done that a few times at home to.  Used to cook that way when  the power went out in the wood  stove  at home
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Online Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #34 on: June 05, 2012, 07:53:33 PM »
....
 I thought at the time that it was pretty functional,  because of it's design it could be used to stir fry,  boil rice,  make soups and stews,  and it also could be used to make breads,  turned over it could be used as a make shift oven.
 I found that a pan of that design can be found in many Asian and Hispanic ethnic grocery and convienience stores for pretty cheap money,  most are nothing more than hand hamered forged sheet steel,  and that once seasoned,  cook almost as good as cast iron,  but at 1/4 the weight of cast iron.
And that is why a wok has replaced most of my cast iron for camp use, unless car camping.
The "wok" is pretty much a generic name. I found a restaurant supply house that had every conceivable wok size, from 30" to 8". I have a 12" and an 8" packed away in the gear. They can do everything a cast iron "spider" can do, and 4x more...including double as a wash basin!
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #35 on: June 05, 2012, 09:27:43 PM »
OP..  will you be heading back to that store again soon?   I'm interested in a smaller wok if you can get price quotes for me.  :)

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #36 on: June 05, 2012, 10:07:34 PM »
OP..  will you be heading back to that store again soon?   I'm interested in a smaller wok if you can get price quotes for me.  :)

WW.
The store is many miles and years away. These products are readily available through Oriental cooking supply houses. I don't have any links to offer right now, though.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #37 on: June 06, 2012, 05:23:53 AM »
Ok , Thanks OP.  :)   

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #38 on: June 06, 2012, 06:41:49 AM »
Might I suggest a replacement for the wok? In a pinch, a SS dog dish works as a pan.... &/or a wash basin. ;)


I have a couple,  use them for cooking sometimes & for Duke too. Family Dollar/Dollar tree, Pamida, & such should have them & they are usually around $2. pllus or minus.
 :)


Just thought I would mention it.
 :)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #39 on: June 06, 2012, 09:46:43 AM »
Hey now.. I like that idea!   I'll go looking for dog food bowls and maybe even those stainless steel mixing bowls.     Thanks for the idea!  :)

Back on topic:

I've got plans to try doing some shishkabobs on the Sixfooter stove I have for supper tonight.  :)   Beef,onion,mushroom, and green peppers I think.      The Kabob should lay across nicely in those V cuts.  :)

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Angerland

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #40 on: June 08, 2012, 11:43:43 PM »
what a great thread! Great tips and recepies! maybe this needs a sticky so we can come back to it easily?

BTW I have been burning Google up looking for Silesian pans on line to purchase
"We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home."

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #41 on: June 08, 2012, 11:49:43 PM »
Angerland, did you have any luck finding one?     The closest I've come is the disk down in the woods... I'm still pondering on how to get those things off..... my hammer doesnt seem to do the trick.

:)

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Angerland

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #42 on: June 09, 2012, 12:55:15 AM »
No luck yet WW. I will post it up as soon as I do!
"We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home."

Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #43 on: June 09, 2012, 10:52:32 AM »
Angerland, did you have any luck finding one?     The closest I've come is the disk down in the woods... I'm still pondering on how to get those things off..... my hammer doesnt seem to do the trick.

:)

WW.



Did you try the local implement dealers, like I suggested before WW?  Hurry up before the scrap-haulers make their semi-annual runs :doh: :coffee:
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #44 on: June 09, 2012, 12:28:55 PM »
I actually checked out the John Deere place.   28.00 for one with a hole and with out they can order one in for 37.00....     yeeesh...

Sooner or later I'm going to find a welder who's willing to fill a hole for me... :)   


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #45 on: June 09, 2012, 12:48:09 PM »
I actually checked out the John Deere place.   28.00 for one with a hole and with out they can order one in for 37.00....     yeeesh...

Sooner or later I'm going to find a welder who's willing to fill a hole for me... :)   


WW.


For a JUNK one out of the scrap pile?........HOLY KRAP :doh:
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #46 on: June 09, 2012, 02:00:15 PM »
Umm...no...  they didnt say they had junk ones.   These were brand new oily lookin things.    :)

When I was standing there looking at them.. and said.. " holy crap"... he said.. " ya.. and to think some farmers have to replace four or five of them when they hit one of these granite rocks"...  uuuuufda....

And he's never heard of a discada....   I DID hint at a side biz for him...but the glazed look said I lost him.....   ha ha

Back to Moes post.    Anyone here use cereal for snacking ?  Like a gorp but can be used in heated water for a hot meal if needed?    Granola or Grape Nuts come to mind.

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #47 on: June 09, 2012, 02:07:25 PM »
.......
Back to Moes post.    Anyone here use cereal for snacking ?  Like a gorp but can be used in heated water for a hot meal if needed?    Granola or Grape Nuts come to mind.

WW.
Anything that can be heated in water, I don't like raw. Like granola cereal.
I've made cereal packs of Cheerios, Capt Crunch (or similar), a few raisins and/or some Frosted Mini-Wheats. Okay dry, and add some milk (1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water) and you have a passable breakfast.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #48 on: June 09, 2012, 02:22:45 PM »
The reason I asked was because I came across a bunch of homemade granola recipes and thought these might be good things to make, break into chunks and have in a jar in the car for emergencies.    I dont think they'd go horribly stale in the heat of the car if they are sealed in a jar.  ?      And if the emergency or 'darn I forgot to take something with to eat"  was on a chilly day , just heating up some water and dumping these chunks in would have a hot meal for the gut.

Ideas on this idea?

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #49 on: June 09, 2012, 02:54:37 PM »
I never found any cereal I could eat wet with just plain water, or rather wanted to.
Although Special K and Coke is delish! No...seriously! I tried that at the Oregon Caves snack shop when I was about 14, and have it every once in awhile just for nostalgia. It sorta "fizzes" when you chew it. Hahaha!
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