Author Topic: Burl Blanks for spoons?  (Read 2418 times)

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Offline pete28

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Burl Blanks for spoons?
« on: June 18, 2016, 03:20:44 PM »
I have been able to find plenty of blanks for pen making but none for spoon making. I really like the buckeye burl but all the blanks I have found are too short in length. I'm hoping to get pieces around 14 inches long and 1 1/2 - 2 inches thick. 2 inch is preferable. I have plenty of other wood but for some reason finding the burls for making spoons is tough. Does anyone have a favorite vendor they use? I would even be open to buying a square block that is bigger and just needs to be cut to size. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Offline MrFixIt

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2016, 06:25:42 AM »
No help here Pete, but carving a spoon from a burl blank is going to be tough!
Hope you find some, I would like to see how it turns out!
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Offline wissahickon

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2016, 02:38:20 PM »
Have you tried contacting any of the suppliers custom knife makers use?  Pete's Custom Koa, House of Burl and Burl Source are all good options for knife makers, I imagine that they'd be willing to get you what you need size-wise if you contact them. 

Offline Wisconsinwalter

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Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2016, 05:52:09 PM »
Burls are not a good choice for spoons. Because they are porous and that would harbor bacteria and that is just gross.

If looks is your goal, find some recent spalted wood. It will be easier to carve as well

You should consider green wood as well as it is the easiest to carve



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« Last Edit: June 23, 2016, 06:08:43 PM by Wisconsinwalter »

Offline Unknown

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2016, 06:27:33 PM »
Saw some on exotic woods.com and northwoods.


Offline wissahickon

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2016, 06:44:08 PM »
WisconsinWalter,

Do you have any experience with/knowledge of stabilized burls?  I would think that would protect the wood from bacteria well enough (but I'm wrong all the time).  Shouldn't be any more difficult to work either. 

Offline Wisconsinwalter

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Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2016, 06:14:28 PM »
I have plenty experience carving spoons, you can do whatever you think is right. That's your choice.  I doubt you will be able to do it with knives. Sander and Dremel maybe.

I have carved a kuska from a green cherry burl and had blisters for days.

Give it a whirl





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« Last Edit: June 24, 2016, 06:29:51 PM by Wisconsinwalter »

Offline wissahickon

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2016, 11:03:17 PM »
What I mean is have you had any experience with stabilized woods?  I'm curious as to whether or not the resin that gets sucked into the wood is able to seal out bacteria better than unstabilized wood. 

Offline pete28

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2016, 09:34:20 AM »
I should have specified that the spoon is going to be a decorative wall hanger as a gift. Thank you for all the suggestions of suppliers

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Offline pete28

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2016, 09:42:42 AM »
I haven't worked with stabilized wood but have used wood gardener on a palm fronds spoon I made just as an experiment.it was pretty solid. Only use it as a decoration

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Offline Unknown

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2016, 10:57:10 AM »
I've never used stabilized wood either. I kinda get the idea it is turned in a hard block of resin, maybe more like micarta than wood. :shrug: dunno. Never even thought of using it for woodenware.



Offline wissahickon

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2016, 12:17:22 PM »
Unknown, the stabilized wood I'm talking about is actually just normal pieces of wood with the air removed in a vacuum chamber.  When the seal is opened, the resin in the chamber is sucked into the voids left by the vacuum and is then cured in an oven.  My guess is that the wood should be protected from bacteria creeping in as well as plastic is. 

Offline pete28

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2016, 12:32:02 PM »
Unknown, the stabilized wood I'm talking about is actually just normal pieces of wood with the air removed in a vacuum chamber.  When the seal is opened, the resin in the chamber is sucked into the voids left by the vacuum and is then cured in an oven.  My guess is that the wood should be protected from bacteria creeping in as well as plastic is.

I am kind of thinking along the same lines. I'll do a bit more checking.
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Offline wissahickon

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2016, 01:30:27 PM »
Pete, I've used stabilized wood a lot for other projects.  It's very resistant to moisture and is just as easy to work as unstabilized wood.  I think, so long as the spoons get cleaned, and maybe a shot of mineral oil every once in a while, they'd be worth a shot. 

Have a look at www.knifeandgun.com , they sell buckeye burl in blocks and I have found no higher quality from another supplier.  They ship quickly and their customer service is exceptional.  I'd be surprised if they couldn't get you sorted out with the size you need. 

Offline Unknown

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2016, 01:39:29 PM »
Unknown, the stabilized wood I'm talking about is actually just normal pieces of wood with the air removed in a vacuum chamber.  When the seal is opened, the resin in the chamber is sucked into the voids left by the vacuum and is then cured in an oven.  My guess is that the wood should be protected from bacteria creeping in as well as plastic is.

Exactly. The big difference would be whether you are carving the piece and then stabilizing or carving the thing from a stabilized blank. Carving a resin impregnated block of wood, it is my guess, will be nothing like, and much more difficult than carving a blank of dried material, and even further away from starting with green wood.
 
I dont give a lot of thought to bacteria personally. They are all around and tend to mind their own business. Spoons and bowls that I cook with, eat from are almost all tight grain with small diffuse porous structure. When you wash it, it is clean enough imho. The voids, fissure, cracks that Walter was speaking about could get some little bits of food lodged in there. If the food is cooked, or a spoon used for cooking then any bacteria will be killed. I have to wonder how any harmful bacteria would find their way to any of those mini-morsels.

The biggest worry is raw meat, especially chicken, turkey, maybe eggs and ground meat, used with ring, or semi-ring porous hardwoods. Because they have large, pores bacteria can get down in there and possibly hide from the usual disinfection you might use.

That's how I see it. The danger is from transmitting bacteria from contaminated products, not from free ranging bacteria homesteading your kuksa. if you think there is a danger disinfect it. ymmv.

Offline Unknown

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2016, 01:40:39 PM »
Pete, I've used stabilized wood a lot for other projects.  It's very resistant to moisture and is just as easy to work as unstabilized wood.  I think, so long as the spoons get cleaned, and maybe a shot of mineral oil every once in a while, they'd be worth a shot. 

Have a look at www.knifeandgun.com , they sell buckeye burl in blocks and I have found no higher quality from another supplier.  They ship quickly and their customer service is exceptional.  I'd be surprised if they couldn't get you sorted out with the size you need.

just as easy using what tools?

Offline Wisconsinwalter

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2016, 03:13:26 PM »
I guess I look at spoon carving differently, I know you can you use anything for tools and material. I have came a long in carving and tend to look at treen as use of green wood.

A wall hanger using a dry or resinous material becomes fine woodworking.

Good luck with your spoon and show your results


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Offline Unknown

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2016, 03:23:38 PM »
Yep. You can end up spending as much time with finish cuts after drying, as you did in green wood rough shaping but the volume of wood removed should be vastly different.

Offline wissahickon

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #18 on: June 25, 2016, 07:22:40 PM »
Pete, I've used stabilized wood a lot for other projects.  It's very resistant to moisture and is just as easy to work as unstabilized wood.  I think, so long as the spoons get cleaned, and maybe a shot of mineral oil every once in a while, they'd be worth a shot. 

Have a look at www.knifeandgun.com , they sell buckeye burl in blocks and I have found no higher quality from another supplier.  They ship quickly and their customer service is exceptional.  I'd be surprised if they couldn't get you sorted out with the size you need.

just as easy using what tools?

In my case, a variety of saws, files, occasionally chisels, and grinders.

Offline pete28

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2016, 05:14:40 PM »
When I started carving I used any piece of wood I could find in abundance. For me at the time that was sparkle berry. For those who have not heard of it the wood is very hard but it caused me to learn the benefit of having sharp tools. Now I'll carve just about anything.  Soon as I can money wise I'll order a small slab of buckeye burl and see what I come up with.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2016, 09:23:09 PM »
I did NOT read every post in this topic, but , as ya know, I have sent ya some apple wood for some carving uses if they are suitable.
 :)


  Now,  for the "grist" of my post. I have been waiting to "harvest" a Cherry tree burl for over a year. It is about the size of a volleyball or so. The tree is dead. I do not know the condition , nor whether the burl has been taken yet (as someone has been harvesting a lot of the cherry in that ara for their own uses... :( Kinda makes me mad as they are being A-holes in their methods... Another rant somewhere else...), but I can go tomorrow, or the next few days... & harvest it to find out if it is viable for any carving uses or is just a ball of crap. I will send the whole thing to you if you like, if it might be of use to you. or, a part of it, if that is all ya might want, because I was thinking of using it to make a kuksa/cup or bowl at some time in the future. NO worries... If you want. I will go get, if it is still there..
;)


  Since I am busy this time of year in my assorted endeavors to make a buck, I would not have time to do anything with it until Fall/winter & if you are in a need & would like to try to use it for some of your carving, just try to let me know in the next day or so. Then I will go out there & if it is still there, I will harvest it & just send it to ya in a "chunk" . If it is gone.. Well we both lost out.
 ;)


Up to you now.
 ;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline pete28

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Re: Burl Blanks for spoons?
« Reply #21 on: July 01, 2016, 03:24:50 PM »
I did NOT read every post in this topic, but , as ya know, I have sent ya some apple wood for some carving uses if they are suitable.
 :)


  Now,  for the "grist" of my post. I have been waiting to "harvest" a Cherry tree burl for over a year. It is about the size of a volleyball or so. The tree is dead. I do not know the condition , nor whether the burl has been taken yet (as someone has been harvesting a lot of the cherry in that ara for their own uses... :( Kinda makes me mad as they are being A-holes in their methods... Another rant somewhere else...), but I can go tomorrow, or the next few days... & harvest it to find out if it is viable for any carving uses or is just a ball of crap. I will send the whole thing to you if you like, if it might be of use to you. or, a part of it, if that is all ya might want, because I was thinking of using it to make a kuksa/cup or bowl at some time in the future. NO worries... If you want.
I will go get, if it is still there..
;)

I love the apple wood my friend. I am working on a few different projects with it :) I say make the kuksa! Truth be told I won't have time to do any carving for a while lol. I greatly appreciate the offer though jb.


  Since I am busy this time of year in my assorted endeavors to make a buck, I would not have time to do anything with it until Fall/winter & if you are in a need & would like to try to use it for some of your carving, just try to let me know in the next day or so. Then I will go out there & if it is still there, I will harvest it & just send it to ya in a "chunk" . If it is gone.. Well we both lost out.
 ;)


Up to you now.
 ;)
The more you look with your eyes the less you will truly see.