Author Topic: Bushcraft Knife Safety  (Read 1589 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 414
    • NatureOutside
Bushcraft Knife Safety
« on: September 17, 2016, 10:42:27 AM »


I teach modern wilderness survival classes for California State Parks and other nonprofit organizations.  During classes students use knives to help construct shelters, prepare tinder, and start fires.

Many students live in suburban and urban areas.  Using a knife outdoors is not part of their daily lives.  So needless to say, I dedicate a portion of each class to learning knife safety and sound technique.  The students are attentive and I've never had an unsafe situation in class.

But it's a lot of material for students to remember.  I worry that they won't retain the information once they leave the class.  So I created a knife safety article/cheat sheet online for students to refresh what we learned in class.

Here's a link to the article, below.  You may find it helpful if you instruct youth or adults new to using a knife outdoors.

http://www.natureoutside.com/bushcraft-knife-safety-9-tips-to-avoid-accidents/


Can you suggest any additional knife safety tips?

  - Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 17395
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2016, 12:55:02 PM »
I can't think of any right off hand.  That's a well done comprehensive list....Thanks, woodsorrel! :thumbsup:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrea.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Orbean

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 925
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2016, 01:04:38 PM »
Great post. I will pass it on.
Nice matters

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 414
    • NatureOutside
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2016, 01:59:16 PM »
Thanks, Wolfy and Orbean!  I really appreciate your opinions.

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 7713
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2016, 05:17:48 PM »
Thanks, Wolfy and Orbean!  I really appreciate your opinions.

- Woodsorrel

  Thanks woodsorrel,  I'm going to try your donut recipe asap.    :thumbsup:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline U.W.

  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 672
  • Charred Cloth Challenge
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2016, 06:21:33 PM »


Here's a link to the article, below.  You may find it helpful if you instruct youth or adults new to using a knife outdoors.
http://www.natureoutside.com/bushcraft-knife-safety-9-tips-to-avoid-accidents/

Can you suggest any additional knife safety tips?

  - Woodsorrel


Nice looking knife.  Is it an Aurora?


As to safety tips.  For the same reason "a sharp knife is a safe knife" - Any time you find yourself having to "push hard" or exert a lot of force while using a blade, or cutting something - STOP -.  Evaluate, or Re-evaluate what you are doing, or trying to do.  Make sure it is safe, or figure out a different way that is.  A sharp knife is a safe knife however, if you are exerting a lot of force -  it can become a very dangerous knife. 
I have cut myself very horribly in the past because I did not follow that simple rule.  My knife(s) are indeed very sharp. 
Likely there is a better way to say, or summarize all that...


u.w.

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 414
    • NatureOutside
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2016, 07:47:33 AM »

  Thanks woodsorrel,  I'm going to try your donut recipe asap.    :thumbsup:

Moe, it's wonderful to wake in the wilderness and hear the birds' morning chorus.  But it's even better with a piping hot glazed doughnut!  :)

Let me know how it works for you.  If you have any suggestions to improve the recipe or instructions, that would be great.

For people not familiar with the recipe Moe is referring to, here it is:  http://www.natureoutside.com/the-secret-to-make-piping-hot-doughnuts-while-camping/.


  - Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 414
    • NatureOutside
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2016, 07:54:18 AM »

Nice looking knife.  Is it an Aurora?

As to safety tips.  For the same reason "a sharp knife is a safe knife" - Any time you find yourself having to "push hard" or exert a lot of force while using a blade, or cutting something - STOP -.  Evaluate, or Re-evaluate what you are doing, or trying to do.  Make sure it is safe, or figure out a different way that is.  A sharp knife is a safe knife however, if you are exerting a lot of force -  it can become a very dangerous knife... 


You're right on target, U.W.!  It's a Bark River Aurora, in A-2 steel, with a spalted maple burl handle and black pinstripe liners.  I have a black JRE dangler sheath for it so I can wear it with low-riding backpacks.  I also think the black sheath better matches the knife. (Vanity, I know)

I like your point about stopping and assessing the situation if you feel yourself exerting too much force on the knife.  I'll try to incorporate this in the section that talks about keeping a sharp knife.

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline Unknown

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2649
  • Alcholocost of Gibberish
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2016, 08:31:32 AM »
Thanks for sharing your lesson plan Woodsorrel. To continue with the idea of making a forceful cut in a safe manner, I think you have it in there. Using a backstop provides the potential to make some of the strongest cuts.

I don't have much contact with beginners. So I'm not sure if it is even approiate to talk to them about making strong cuts. I do think it is a necessary and desirable thing. Trying to make any cut that does include a specific methodology or technique to stop the blade from cutting the user should the blade slip is never a good idea.

Offline wsdstan

  • Supporting Member
  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 7764
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2016, 02:20:12 PM »
I used the palm of my hand as a backstop this morning when cutting a taped plastic tube to remove it from the irrigation pipe.  Don't do that.  It not only hurts it bleeds a lot.   :-[
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline U.W.

  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 672
  • Charred Cloth Challenge
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2016, 02:45:19 PM »
I used the palm of my hand as a backstop this morning when cutting a taped plastic tube to remove it from the irrigation pipe.  Don't do that.  It not only hurts it bleeds a lot.   :-[


Dang!  I hope it wasn't too bad.  I've got 'a few' of those scars myself....  On me, For me - I call'em dumb-dumb wounds/scars, and I've got to many of them.  I got'em 'cause I was being dumb at the time. 
It is surprising how long they can bleed - another "benefit" of an extremely sharp blade, lol. Those cuts just bleed and bleed and bleed.  Though good blood flow does irrigate the wound, it's not necessarily always ideal - lol. 
Staying calm/relaxed, elevation, direct pressure, and if possible ice, or something nice and cold, in the pressure application - is what I've found to make it stop the best.  Unless of course you nicked, or went through something major - that's a whole different ball game though.  Some honey on/in it is what I've found will heal it fastest too.


Quote from: woodsorrel
It's a Bark River Aurora, in A-2 steel, with a spalted maple burl handle and black pinstripe liners.  I have a black JRE dangler sheath for it so I can wear it with low-riding backpacks.  I also think the black sheath better matches the knife.

Well it certain is a beautiful knife to my eye, and BRK&T is outstanding quality in my experience. I've got a few.

u.w. 

Offline wsdstan

  • Supporting Member
  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 7764
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2016, 04:00:12 PM »
LOL, dumb dumb is exactly the right name for what I did.  Perfect description.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 414
    • NatureOutside
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2016, 06:27:47 PM »
I used the palm of my hand as a backstop this morning when cutting a taped plastic tube to remove it from the irrigation pipe.  Don't do that.  It not only hurts it bleeds a lot.   :-[

Ouch!  I hope you're alright wsdstan

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline Usingmyrights

  • Mill File+
  • *
  • Posts: 40
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2016, 06:48:47 PM »
A lot of firearm safety can be transferred over to sharps. Being awareleased of what's around the blade, what's going to get cut if a slip were to happen, etc. My worst cut was with a folder at a mall knife shop. 5 stitches and some embarrassment later I was good to go.
Autocorrect hates me and I rarely proofread so whatever sounds good is what I actually meant.

Offline wsdstan

  • Supporting Member
  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 7764
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2016, 07:14:27 PM »
Thanks Woodsorrel, I am fine.  Living on a farm I expect a disaster every week or so.  Sometimes it is me, sometimes my truck. 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 414
    • NatureOutside
Re: Bushcraft Knife Safety
« Reply #15 on: September 18, 2016, 07:20:26 PM »
... Sometimes it is me, sometimes my truck.

Sounds like the title of a country song! :)

Glad you're alright.

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om