Author Topic: black walnut for spoons>  (Read 587 times)

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Offline hayshaker

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black walnut for spoons>
« on: December 11, 2016, 08:10:30 AM »
i have  a few pieces of blk'walnut when cutting into one
the outer flesh seemed to resemble olivewood light in color
yellow stripes what i would do for a bqand saw right now.
so does anyone here ever use the outer flesh when carving
spoons and such? or knife scales even. just wondering.

Offline Unknown

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Re: black walnut for spoons>
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2016, 10:43:15 AM »
Is it still green?

Asking because often coloring will change after drying out.

Right off hand I can't think of a reason you couldn't use the sapwood. It's not going to be heavy and dense as olive wood. It should be relatively soft and easy to carve; it will shrink more than heartwood- not a big deal for spoons, I'd think. Best luck.

Offline U.W.

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Re: black walnut for spoons>
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2016, 11:30:46 AM »
i have  a few pieces of black walnut.  when cutting into one piece,
the outer flesh seemed to resemble olive wood: light in color, and
yellow stripes.  what i would do for a band saw right now.

so does anyone here ever use the outer flesh when carving
spoons and such? or knife scales even. just wondering.


I've carved Black Walnut a bit, both the heartwood (inner flesh?) and sapwood (outer flesh?).  It works just fine for such things as spoons and such.  I have zero experience with using it for knife scales.
Just my own humble opinion here, but don't use a band saw...  for carving spoons and such, that is.  Stick with the hand held axe, and knife (bent, or hook, and straight).  Totally your choice for sure of course, and I'm not judging one bit either way - just saying.
It is a pretty wood definitely, and yes the sapwood can have that 'yellow-ish' or 'cream-ish' color to it.  Once you start looking more at it more you'll also see the pale, subtle purplish coloring that ranges all the way to and thru the very deep, rich coffee browns also. 


u.w.

Offline hayshaker

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Re: black walnut for spoons>
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2016, 04:47:16 PM »
let's see one the wood is a few years old
and i mentioned band saw that was i reference to cutting knife scales.

Offline Unknown

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Re: black walnut for spoons>
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2016, 07:03:16 PM »
That's cool then. I agree with UW, shouldn't need a bandsaw to knock off a spoon blank. Then see how it carves. Hopefully it's not decayed and crumbly.