Author Topic: stiching sheaths  (Read 945 times)

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Offline hayshaker

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stiching sheaths
« on: December 12, 2016, 06:24:36 AM »
i've ben looking for some time at the threads posted of peoples
sheaths theyhave made and appear  to be machine done.
where do iind a inexspensie sewing machine to do this?

Offline Moe M.

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2016, 07:33:57 AM »
i've ben looking for some time at the threads posted of peoples
sheaths theyhave made and appear  to be machine done.
where do iind a inexspensie sewing machine to do this?

  Finding an inexpensive HD sewing machine that will sew 9~12 ounce leather is like finding a an 1800's uncirculated  double eagle in an old box of tools you bought at the local junk shop,  it just don't happen regularly.

  Anyhow,  most home crafters and high quality leather workers making small leather projects like sheaths, holsters, belts, fire kit bags and such hand sew their work,   it looks better, lasts longer,  and rarely comes apart over time and under stress.
  Use waxed cotton carpet weight thread or artificial sinew,  use two saddle needles and lock your stitches,  cut out your pattern,  glue the parts together with contact cement,  mark the holes with a stitching wheel, if you don't have one a regular kitchen fork will do, use an awl to make your holes, but a small bit on the end of a Dremel tool is faster,  if you're going to dye the leather do it after you've finished the sewing and rounded the edges.
  Before you start google "how to make a leather knife sheath" and watch the videos,  you'll end up with a better result if you take the time.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Dano

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2016, 07:54:29 AM »
I'm not sure there is an inexpensive machine for stitching leather  :-[   

I try to look at it from a couple different perspectives.  First, look at the investment cost vs the payoff.  Is a machine going to pay itself off in enough time to make the investment worth it?  And do you have enough leather work to do, that an investment like that is beneficial to your endeavors?  By that mostly I mean can you afford to invest that kind of money to have it just sit there when you don't need it/use it?  Or could that money be better invested in other things to allow you to open other avenues of interests?

Secondly, I look at the stitch quality.  While a machine stitch looks great, I don't consider it to be as strong as hand stitching.  It's something that gets debated rather heavily, but research the pros and cons of both types of stitching and decide from there.

A machine stitch uses a "lock stitch", where one side goes through and the other wraps around it before getting pulled back through.  If either side breaks, the entire line of stitching will lose it's tension over time.  If it is something that has pressure pulling on it, the stitching will loosen rather quickly.  Each stitch is relying on the integrity of the other to hold up.

Traditional saddle stitching by hand has each side of the thread passing through the holes, one after the other.  You can cut one side and the other will still hold.  Yes it can loosen, but it takes a much longer time.  You don't have the unraveling effect like with a machine stitch, and you can repair it much easier.  Simply back up two or three holes, insert and center a new thread, and resew the damaged area.  The new thread will hold the old thread in place.  If a machine stitch breaks, you mostly have to re do the entire line of stitching.

I'm sure there are those that disagree with my thoughts, and I hope they chime in to offer their opinions.   Machine stitching will certainly increase your productivity, but at a much higher cost.   JMHO

Offline wolfy

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2016, 09:35:04 AM »
Moe & Dan gave you some excellent advice.  Here's a very good tutorial that's been here almost as long as the forum has been in existence.  It comes from one of the 'stickies' at the top of this section....

http://bladesandbushlore.com/index.php?topic=16.0

Don't forget to check on these valuable, but often overlooked 'stickies' for really good information.  They exist in almost every section of the forum. :cheers:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2016, 09:38:52 AM »
Woops.....double tap. :-X  :-[
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrea.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2016, 10:39:26 AM »
All great responses so far.

I use a small drill press attachment for a dremel tool to drill holes after marking them with an overstitch wheel. Then follow up with a saddle stitch.

Offline Sarge

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2016, 11:16:26 AM »
Good advice here.

I've never tried a machine. I do the saddle stitch mentioned above. I've punched holes with a mallet and awl, and I've used a drill press. Just have to find a good size awl or drill bit for the needle and thread you use. I use Tandy Harness Needles (Size 000, I think) and a 1/16" drill bit. I've bought several different awls but my favorite is just an old ice pick. Holes need to be large enough to allow the needle/thread to pass through relatively easily but small enough to allow stitching to tighten up and to hide the holes.

Well, sorry I didn't answer your question about finding a machine but maybe some of the info and the link to the tutorial will help until you can find one. 
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Offline hayshaker

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2016, 11:55:08 AM »
wolfy i printed out that sticky and i wish to thank everyone for thier insight and input.
i guess some times OLD SCHOOL is best. thank goodness i have a load of artificial sniew
from when i was making the stone and bone knifes. as well as some of the tools
cause at one point i was putting tools together to make shoes.

Offline wolfy

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2016, 02:43:25 PM »
Here's a really helpful source for budding knifemakers that may be of help to you, too......17 pages of good suggestions on all facets of building. :thumbsup:

http://www.northcoastknives.com/northcoast_knives_tutorials_hints_tips.htm
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrea.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline hayshaker

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2016, 07:00:22 PM »
wow wulfy that was exasusting thanks.

Offline Unknown

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Re: stiching sheaths
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2016, 08:15:17 PM »
I've ordered a few things from NorthCoast. Don't recall if it was the only place or first place I found the junior size loveless bolts, and got other stuff. I was happy with prices and service, shipping cost.

I think hand stitch looks better than machine  too, even with drilled holes, but I try to avoid doing that.