Author Topic: inexpensive bushcraft knives  (Read 1363 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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inexpensive bushcraft knives
« on: January 28, 2017, 09:37:27 AM »
  As most of you here at B&B that follow my posting already know,  I'm not usually a big fan of junk or fad knives,  that said, not all inexpensive knives are junk,  the Mora line of outdoor knives is a good example of that,  Mora knives have gained a pretty darned good reputation for being tough, sharp, and capable woods knives, and that reputation has been well earned.
  Back many years ago Mora hunting and fishing type knives were my go to blades of choice,  that's before Bushcraft was invented and Battoning campfire wood came into vogue, and before Mora transitioned from comfortable ergonomically shaped Birch handles and leather belt sheaths to painted hardwood or molded plastic handles and cheap plastic sheaths.
  Now that's not to say that Mora knives can't handle those kinds of tasks, it's been proved and accepted without question that they can and do,  what they can't do however (IMHO) is look classy doing them,  at this point I'm sure someone reading this is saying "What cha talken 'bout dude",  well the answer to that is that I have a personal bias towards plastic, I hate the stuff, and for allot of valid reasons that I won't get into.
  What I'd like to do is get a conversation going about "other" inexpensive fixed blade knives on the market that perform well as woodsman's knives and look good doing it,  I'm going to kick off the discussion with one of my likes as far as bushcraft and woodsman's knives go,  for the sake of this discussion the deciding factors include price, performance, looks, and ability.
  In the last 18 or so months I've had a chance to try out some knives from Condor Knife and Tool Co.,  one of the knives is owned by me, the others are owned by friends who are into the type of outdoor hobbies that require a fixed blade knife,  mine happens to be a Condor Kephart that I did a review of here a couple of years ago,  the others that I have had some experience with are the Condor Bushlore,  Condor Bushlaw, (to different knives) and the Condor Final Frontier.
  Before going any further it should be noted that Condor K&T Co. is not noted for it's high quality control standards, truth is it sucks and many people have been disappointed with fit and finish and with uneven edge grinds as most of the work on these knives are done by hand on bench grinders and belt sanders,  the steel used is 1075 instead of the 1095 we are used to,  that said their heat treat has been very good and their blades take and hold a decent edge, not on a par with high end customs, but decent for their price point.
 If you choose to buy a Condor knife from Amazon or E-bay you pay your money and take your chances that you will get one with a nice finish and a good edge grind,  I suggest you look into Baronyx Knife Co.,  they sell Condor knives as well as other popular brands at less than full retail and prices comparable to Amazon,  but the owner hand selects every knife that comes into his store and rejects and sends back any knife that doesn't meet his strict standards,  and he offers a service that is an extra select inspection and an edge refinish that insures the edge will be perfect and shaving sharp for a fee of $3.00 dollars extra,  and well worth the extra three bucks IMHO.
 More on my thoughts on these knives later, but my suggestion if you're in the market for an inexpensive ($30.00~ $70.00 bushcraft type knife is to do a search on line for video reviews of the different Condor offerings,  I think you might just be impressed as another option to a Mid priced Mora.

 If you have suggestions for other inexpensive brands of woods knives feel free to note them on this thread. 
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Offline madmax

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2017, 09:50:24 AM »
While I love my custom knives from the likes of Red and Crash,  I took a wilderness survival course with a Opinel folder.  Didn't baton red oak or chop down trees but did fine.  I have a #2 fixed blade Opinel in my pack right now.  My thoughts are if you can afford it get a good custom.  You won't regret it.  But if you don't have the money... I've gone out with an Old Hickory butcher knife and was fine.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2017, 10:02:56 AM »
While I love my custom knives from the likes of Red and Crash,  I took a wilderness survival course with a Opinel folder.  Didn't baton red oak or chop down trees but did fine.  I have a #2 fixed blade Opinel in my pack right now.  My thoughts are if you can afford it get a good custom.  You won't regret it.  But if you don't have the money... I've gone out with an Old Hickory butcher knife and was fine.

 Excellent choices,  I have a vintage Case butcher knife and also an old no name high carbon steel butcher knife that I've modified to look like Kephart styled knives and also did an Old Hickory that I gave to one of my sons that are all really good outdoors knives and are allot of fun to modify,  also have a vintage #9 Opinel that I'd never part with.
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Offline xj35s

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2017, 01:56:58 PM »
Thanks for the baryonyx site I've never seen that before.


I've mentioned before how much I love my Schrade. I'm still batoning all my kindling in the house for the wood stove and it shows very little use after 3 years.

This knife, Winchester from TSC. It was originally $30+, but I got it on clearance for $12. On a whim because I liked the handle. 150th year anniversary tin/display case came with it. I shaved some hard wood dowels into a type of crochet hook trying to make tire spoons.(didn't work) It didn't really dull the blade at all. I was very impressed by that. It says stainless steel but doesn't specify 440. It  has nice balance too. China made yes. I'll beat it up for a while.

« Last Edit: January 28, 2017, 02:06:18 PM by xj35s »
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Offline upthecreek

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2017, 02:20:14 PM »
Very inexpensive, not a custom nor a brand name. Made in America. Very effective cutter. Liables to kill for it in a survival situation.



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Offline gizamo

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2017, 02:59:58 PM »
At $55 on sale the new Mora Garsberg is another option. I bought it with the multi mount....for the canoe. I'll get around  to making a leather sheath for it someday.  For now it's the truck knife.  Want to get out this Winter and put it through its paces.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2017, 03:29:14 PM »
Thanks for the baryonyx site I've never seen that before.


I've mentioned before how much I love my Schrade. I'm still batoning all my kindling in the house for the wood stove and it shows very little use after 3 years.

This knife, Winchester from TSC. It was originally $30+, but I got it on clearance for $12. On a whim because I liked the handle. 150th year anniversary tin/display case came with it. I shaved some hard wood dowels into a type of crochet hook trying to make tire spoons.(didn't work) It didn't really dull the blade at all. I was very impressed by that. It says stainless steel but doesn't specify 440. It  has nice balance too. China made yes. I'll beat it up for a while.



  I've had some good experiences with Chinese made knives,  two that come to mind are Gerber made,  one is a Profile model fixed blade,  it was sold to me by accident for $20.00 bucks at Walmart, I had ordered a Bucklite skeleton knife and ended up with the profile,  I used it for several bushcraft trips and was really impressed with the knife,  so much so that when Woods Woman was asking about what kind of knife she could get on a tight budget I gifted her the profile,  that was about three years ago and as far as I know she's still using it.
 The other was a Bear Gryll's Ultimate Survival Knife (also from Gerber),  I beat the hell out of it and it never failed me,  it was the Gen.ll model with the partially serrated blade,  it's in my truck's emergency kit,  I actually bought another one with a full plain edge blade,  it too has been a great user woods knife.
 I also have a few Chinese made Rough Rider pocket knives that I can't say anything bad about,  they've actually been allot better quality than my newer Case Made knives.
 
 I opened this thread talking about but not limited to Condor knives,  what's renewed my interest in Condor is because of a couple of friends that belong to the same local (So. New England) bushcraft group that I hang with,  they started buying Condor blade blanks that are totally finished in the white for under $20.00 dollars,  they have been playing with modifying them a little and adding their own scales,  some have turned out to be beautiful semi custom knives with very serviceable blades.
 I bought my Condor Kephart a couple of years ago from Amazon for about $30.00 dollars,  when it arrived it wasn't perfect, nor did I expect it to be,  the walnut scales were smooth but unfinished, the blade was moderately sharp but the grind wasn't right,  the blade where it met the handle tapered on the right side from 1/8 th. to the about 3/32 at the tip.
 I reshaped the edge and sharpened it to a keen edge,  it's a great slicer and excels at food prep and as a game knife but it's not a strong bushcraft knife,  I have battoned small pieces of wood for the fire but I doubt it would hold up to doing it on a regular basis,  I gave it a good review when I first got it but I'm reluctant to give it any rough use.
 However, other guys that bought theirs from Baronyx Knife Co. haven't experience such problems and been pretty much satisfied with their knives,  I have a custom Woodlaw model coming in around the middle of the week and I'm looking forward to giving it some use,  it started out as a blank blade,  Tan Micarta scales with green and yellow spacers were added to it and a matching fire steel is coming with it,  if it runs as good as it looks I should be quite happy with it,  and the price is right.
 If it works out ok I'm thinking of ordering a Woodlore blade and customizing it myself as a winter project.

 BTW- I'm pretty sure that OP has one of those Winchester fixed blades and it's one of his favorite knives for harvesting his rabbits.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2017, 03:32:35 PM »
At $55 on sale the new Mora Garsberg is another option. I bought it with the multi mount....for the canoe. I'll get around  to making a leather sheath for it someday.  For now it's the truck knife.  Want to get out this Winter and put it through its paces.

 Good price on the Garsberg,  let us know how it works for you.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2017, 03:33:26 PM »
Very inexpensive, not a custom nor a brand name. Made in America. Very effective cutter. Liables to kill for it in a survival situation.



Creek

  Have you tried battoning with it yet ?
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Offline xj35s

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2017, 03:47:56 PM »
Probably not but I bet he can feather the hell out of a match stick!!!!
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Offline Unknown

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2017, 04:14:52 PM »
Probably not but I bet he can feather the hell out of a match stick!!!!

And check it out- made in the U.S.A.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2017, 08:43:56 PM »
Unlike the last time this subject was addressed, I'm pleased to hear some of the comments about the Gerbers.  This Winchester knife, made for Gerber, was gifted to me by my son who got tired of me borrowing HIS knife for gutting and skinning deer.  I'm so pleased with its performance on fish, fowl, fur and wood that I in turn gifted my 50 year old Buck Special to my other son, and made this Winchester my go-to field knife.  It retailed at Wal-Mart for $14.95 at the time of purchase.

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Offline xj35s

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2017, 11:00:10 PM »
 :cheers:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2017, 11:39:29 PM »

  I've had some good experiences with Chinese made knives, ....

 BTW- I'm pretty sure that OP has one of those Winchester fixed blades and it's one of his favorite knives for harvesting his rabbits.
Yup, Moe. Just posted about that. As for Chinese knives, all that glitters is not junk.  After all, the Chinese have been folding steel for over 2,000 years.  They're bound to have got something right in all that time.  Their metallurgy certainly surpasses anything developed in the middle ages in Europe.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2017, 07:57:51 AM »

  I've had some good experiences with Chinese made knives, ....

 BTW- I'm pretty sure that OP has one of those Winchester fixed blades and it's one of his favorite knives for harvesting his rabbits.
Yup, Moe. Just posted about that. As for Chinese knives, all that glitters is not junk.  After all, the Chinese have been folding steel for over 2,000 years.  They're bound to have got something right in all that time.  Their metallurgy certainly surpasses anything developed in the middle ages in Europe.

 The way I look at it is that when a business can't compete in the market place it can do one of two things,  model it so that it can compete or close it's doors,  I'll agree that some Chinese made goods are junk,  some have in the past been down right dangerous like some of their imported food products,  kids toys and some cookware that contain lead and other toxic stuff, and some of their cutting tools are made from poor quality steels.
 In my opinion those are either made by Chinese owned companies that either don't have the money to invest in modern factories or by Companies who just want to sell cheaply made goods by volume for a healthy profit and then move on to something else when their market goes dry,  also, now that China has become a world leader in manufacturing and distribution it's putting out much better products than it did a decade ago.
 A good example is Harbor Freight,  ten years ago everything they sold was junk, today most of their tools are pretty darned good,  my youngest son is a mechanic,  in his job he uses various air tools, he just bought another impact driver,  he replaces it and other air tools usually once a year,  he could buy Craftsman or Snap-on power tools that would last much longer, but they're up to 10 times the price of Harbor freight tools in some instances.
 Another thing to consider which brings us back to this conversation and I'll use Gerber Knife Co. as an example,  Gerber could no longer produce much of it's cutlery line in the US and still compete on the low end knife market so they moved it to China where the cost of labor is much lower and the regulations that work against business are much less,  but Gerber still runs the operation, still controls the materials and tooling that goes into their products and still maintains a strong quality control and inspection division, an excellent customer service policy, and that's the difference.
 No legitimate company goes into business in order to fail,  there are a lot of American and foreign companies who either want to maintain or build a good reputation and are in business for the long haul,  I'm as patriotic as the next guy and more so than many,  but I'm also a realist,  so I recognize that there are some products that I need that are no longer made in the USA or that cost more in the US than I can afford to pay,  so I support those businesses that afford me good quality goods at affordable prices, it's what makes the free market work.   
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Offline hayshaker

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2017, 08:56:50 AM »
as for jnk chinese knives don't blame them. they manufacture products as the coutomer requests,
you want s*&t knives they'll make'em. you want to pay for quality they can do that too. really.
what it all boils down to is the bottmline, stock share price and company exec's pay package
and the annual share holders meeting.

in america manufactoring has went down and its our own fault, period. the stock market
has more todo with than anything else. our own greed did us in.

Offline Orbean

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2017, 09:56:08 AM »
as for jnk chinese knives don't blame them. they manufacture products as the coutomer requests,
you want s*&t knives they'll make'em. you want to pay for quality they can do that too. really.
what it all boils down to is the bottmline, stock share price and company exec's pay package
and the annual share holders meeting.

in america manufactoring has went down and its our own fault, period. the stock market
has more todo with than anything else. our own greed did us in.

The stock market has nothing to do with the production of cheap made in China knives, consumers are responsible. They make what the market desires.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2017, 10:32:22 AM »
as for jnk chinese knives don't blame them. they manufacture products as the coutomer requests,
you want s*&t knives they'll make'em. you want to pay for quality they can do that too. really.
what it all boils down to is the bottmline, stock share price and company exec's pay package
and the annual share holders meeting.

in america manufactoring has went down and its our own fault, period. the stock market
has more todo with than anything else. our own greed did us in.

The stock market has nothing to do with the production of cheap made in China knives, consumers are responsible. They make what the market desires.
I disagree that the American market desires inferior products.  But manufacturers will gladly sell junk to people willing, or too ignorant, to buy it.  The American consumer seems willing to buy the junk imported as long as it's inexpensive.  You're right that the consumer is responsible for this.  It goes back to what Moe said about the mind-set where a cheap foreign tool that lasts a year can be thrown away and replaced.  The market thrives because of this "disposable society" we've embraced.  I have Stanley tools handed down from my father that are many decades old, and better built than the same brand these days. 

Sorry...I feel a rant coming on...
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Offline Orbean

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2017, 10:48:55 AM »
Market responds to demand, econ 101. Without demand there is no reason to produce
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Offline wolfy

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2017, 11:59:04 AM »
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Offline xj35s

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2017, 12:18:46 PM »
Stop. This is about bushcraft knives that don't break the bank. Some are made in Indonesia and Pakistan.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2017, 12:55:57 PM »
Market responds to demand, econ 101. Without demand there is no reason to produce

 Yes but only to a small extent,  and it can go both ways,  some thing are better today,  many of us lament that cars are too complicated today,  often you can't even work on them because you can't buy brand specific tools or the expensive diagnostic tools needed to find the problems,  yet those simple cars of the '40's, '50's, and '60's needed allot of maintenance, frequent oil changes and tune ups,  and were pretty well finished at 80,000 miles.
 Today most cars will go 100,000 miles without having to have the drive train worked on,  cars and light duty trucks with 250,000 miles on them are not uncommon,  bias thread tires were good for about 25,000 miles for the high end models,  I just bought a new set of mid priced tires for the wife's Volvo that have a 60,000 mile warrantee.
 On the other end of the spectrum,  Back in the '50's, '60's, and '70's Buck knives were the go to quality sportsman's blade of choice,  I have a vintage Buck Skinning knife I bought back in the '60's that been through more game than I can remember and even did duty as my main woods knife for several years,  outside of a faded finish it's still like new,  hard to sharpen, but takes a good edge and hangs on to it like few knives I have in my collection,  I also have a Buck special that one of my grandsons gave me as a birthday gift,  it's still made in the US still looks the same as a sixty year old Buck special,  but it won't take a decent edge, and it dulls after a few light uses,  hard use results in chipping and or rolling of the cutting edge,  in other words, it's junk compared to my vintage Buck knives.
 My point is that while demand does drive the market, it's industry that sets the standards for the goods they produce,  and as long as we the buying public continue to buy the junk they turn out,  we will continue to have to choose which brand of junk we want to buy.
 When talking about Chinese made knives two companies that stand out  as far as being tuned to the demands of it's customers and putting out consistently good quality low priced cutting tools Gerber is one and Schrade is the other, and I'm pretty sure that Schrade makes knives for the Winchester and Colt brand knives,  I watched a good Gauntlet review video by "bushcraft on Fire" just yesterday that tested and reviewed a new Schrade hunting styled fixed blade knife,  it had a 4" inch hollow ground blade of 440C Stainless, heat treated to a Rockwell rating of 59,  was full tang, had burled Ironwood scales with nickel steel bolsters and pins,  the fit, finish, and edge grind were flawless,  just a beautiful knife.
 The testing included slicing, battoning, feather sticks, and lastly as is the norm with Brian on Buchcraft on Fire he threw the knife half a dozen times at a tree trunk in his back yard,  the knife came away undamaged and still shaving sharp,  not bad at all for a Chinese made knife,  oh, and the price on Amazon is $28.99 including a high quality wet formed leather belt sheath.

 My aim here is not to diminish high end knives or to take away from custom made knives,  it's to suggest that there are options out there for those who can't afford to lay out a hundred dollars or more for a high end production or custom made woods knife other than rubber handled plastic sheathed Mora styled knives.     
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Offline 1066vik

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #22 on: January 29, 2017, 03:30:23 PM »
The Schrade Frontier series are pretty nice - 1095, functional designs with handles that are comfortable in a variety of grips, heaths that don't totally suck, and reasonable prices.
such as the SCHF42D & SCHF55

Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2017, 07:12:00 AM »
  Another inexpensive and fun option is to make your own from a blade blank,  I got to see a kit that came from Dave Canterbury's Pathfinder Knife Shop,  I don't know the model number,  I think he offers the blade in three different lengths and two thicknesses,  this one had a 5" inch long cutting edge, was 3/16" thick, 1095 steel,  the blank was left with the forged/heat treat finish which can be sanded of and buffed or left natural,  it comes heat treated, the edge is scandi ground and sharpened to a wire edge and ready to be finished with a strop or finish stone.
 The kit came with the blade pre drilled,  a set of pre shaped walnut scales, a 1/8" pin, and a 1/4" lanyard tube,  what's required to finish the knife is to sand the inside of the grip panels and handle frame,  then glue up the frame and handles, insert the pin and lanyard tube, put he scales in place and clamp them down for as long as it takes for the glue to day,  best to leave them cure over night.'     
 All that's left at that point is the final shaping of the scales,  some kind of finishing oil to seal the wood, and a strop on the edge.
 From what the owner told me the blade has an excellent heat treat, takes a scary sharp edge, and it loves to be beat on,  the spine is squared and throws showers of sparks off a ferro rod and sparks great with flint or chert,  the finished blade blank alone sells for about $30.00 bucks,  unfinished scales in walnut or cherry wood are $15.00  dollars a set,  the brass handle pin and lanyard tubes are $5.00 each.
 I didn't ask if the parts were sold only individually or can be bought as an assembled kit,  either way it's a good deal for a really good general purpose woodcraft/bushcraft knife,  the blade is available in  4-1/4" and 5" cutting edge drop point in 3/16" stock or in a 5-3/4" broader blade camp knife design.
 I'm thinking of ordering the 5" model blade blank,  I have some really nice cured curly maple that would make beautiful scales,  I also have some 1/8" brass rod and 1/4" brass tube laying around in my shop somewhere to use for attaching the scales.
 You can buy the knife finished with a good quality leather sheath from the Pathfinder store for $120.00 plus shipping,  or you can build it yourself for just over $30.00, pop another $30.00 for a sheath and have a good quality bush knife for just about half the store price.
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Offline Orbean

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2017, 07:45:09 AM »

 Yes but only to a small extent,  and it can go both ways,  some thing are better today,  many of us lament that cars are too complicated today,  often you can't even work on them because you can't buy brand specific tools or the expensive diagnostic tools needed to find the problems,  yet those simple cars of the '40's, '50's, and '60's needed allot of maintenance, frequent oil changes and tune ups,  and were pretty well finished at 80,000 miles.
 Today most cars will go 100,000 miles without having to have the drive train worked on,  cars and light duty trucks with 250,000 miles on them are not uncommon,  bias thread tires were good for about 25,000 miles for the high end models,  I just bought a new set of mid priced tires for the wife's Volvo that have a 60,000 mile warrantee

That is not a good analogy, the reason being the auto industry is highly regulated.

I purchased a cold steel Canadian belt knife, it was $15.00 and IMO was a good buy, takes an edge, works well. Did not care for the sheath but that easily fixable. Bought a rough rider folder in desperation, was working out of town and needed a replacement work knife, was pleasantly surprised as it was a well made knife that kept an edge and stood up to a fair amount of abuse.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #25 on: January 30, 2017, 01:04:18 PM »
  Another inexpensive and fun option is to make your own from a blade blank,  I got to see a kit that .....

Always keep your eyes open to possibilities.  I was visiting the Fort Nisqually Historical site, and prowling the gift shop.  I found a Randall "Buffalo Skinner" blank, packaged with the rivets. All that was needed was wood for the scales of my choice.  I believe I paid $10 for the 'kit'.  I finished it off with Zebra Wood.  Wish I had a picture of it, but the knife disappeared along with my ex-wife. :(

I made one other kit.  The whole package was under $20 mail-ordered.  Unknown source. I believe I've posted it before.  It has proved to be an adequate skinner.  I don't know the steel, but it takes a lot of work to put an edge on it, which holds it's sharpness an equally long time.



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Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #26 on: January 30, 2017, 04:14:46 PM »

 Yes but only to a small extent,  and it can go both ways,  some thing are better today,  many of us lament that cars are too complicated today,  often you can't even work on them because you can't buy brand specific tools or the expensive diagnostic tools needed to find the problems,  yet those simple cars of the '40's, '50's, and '60's needed allot of maintenance, frequent oil changes and tune ups,  and were pretty well finished at 80,000 miles.
 Today most cars will go 100,000 miles without having to have the drive train worked on,  cars and light duty trucks with 250,000 miles on them are not uncommon,  bias thread tires were good for about 25,000 miles for the high end models,  I just bought a new set of mid priced tires for the wife's Volvo that have a 60,000 mile warrantee

That is not a good analogy, the reason being the auto industry is highly regulated.


  While the auto industry has to adhere to a great many government regulations,  they are Caf? regulations that apply mostly to fleet average miles per gallon requirements, emissions, safety standards, and Manufacturing EPA regulations, as far as I know their are no regulations governing R&D, design, or improving technology,  that is the industry working to keep ahead of competition.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2017, 04:37:09 PM »
  Another inexpensive and fun option is to make your own from a blade blank,  I got to see a kit that .....

Always keep your eyes open to possibilities.  I was visiting the Fort Nisqually Historical site, and prowling the gift shop.  I found a Randall "Buffalo Skinner" blank, packaged with the rivets. All that was needed was wood for the scales of my choice.  I believe I paid $10 for the 'kit'.  I finished it off with Zebra Wood.  Wish I had a picture of it, but the knife disappeared along with my ex-wife. :(

I made one other kit.  The whole package was under $20 mail-ordered.  Unknown source. I believe I've posted it before.  It has proved to be an adequate skinner.  I don't know the steel, but it takes a lot of work to put an edge on it, which holds it's sharpness an equally long time.





I remember that knife, Ol'P.    I remember when they came out and can maybe can shed a little light on it.  They were marketed by CVA (Connecticut Valley Arms) as a finished knife and in kit form.  Obviously, they were a knockoff copy of Buck's 'Kalinga' model at a more attractive price.  Not too bad a blade I've heard. :thumbsup:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #28 on: January 30, 2017, 05:08:50 PM »

  I've got the Bowie model of that series,  I bought the kit and finished it myself when I ran my gun shop,  the salesman at the time told me that the blades were made by Western Cutlery,  I made a wooden display for it and hung it on the wall,  It's still hanging on the wall in my work shop,  I've never used it but it does have a factory sharp edge and looks like good quality steel,  probably 1095, I thought it might be stainless,  but one of my customers who bought one blued the blade with cold blue,  stainless doesn't take cold blue, so it's got to be carbon steel.
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Offline hunter63

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #29 on: January 30, 2017, 05:47:14 PM »
  Another inexpensive and fun option is to make your own from a blade blank,  I got to see a kit that .....

Always keep your eyes open to possibilities.  I was visiting the Fort Nisqually Historical site, and prowling the gift shop.  I found a Randall "Buffalo Skinner" blank, packaged with the rivets. All that was needed was wood for the scales of my choice.  I believe I paid $10 for the 'kit'.  I finished it off with Zebra Wood.  Wish I had a picture of it, but the knife disappeared along with my ex-wife. :(

I made one other kit.  The whole package was under $20 mail-ordered.  Unknown source. I believe I've posted it before.  It has proved to be an adequate skinner.  I don't know the steel, but it takes a lot of work to put an edge on it, which holds it's sharpness an equally long time.





I remember that knife, Ol'P.    I remember when they came out and can maybe can shed a little light on it.  They were marketed by CVA (Connecticut Valley Arms) as a finished knife and in kit form.  Obviously, they were a knockoff copy of Buck's 'Kalinga' model at a more attractive price.  Not too bad a blade I've heard. :thumbsup:

I remember them as well....from CVA.
Built the "Bowie" and the "Russel Green River" from the kits......did look at that Skinner.
Bowie...
http://cochisefirearms.net/product/2133/


The Russell GR. is still my Rondy. "Go to"...but I lost it last year....Vanished!..Gone for over a year.
Just found it under my table saw last week.....can't tell you how good it made me feel....was like finding an old friend that went everywhere with me for 30+ years.

Any love for a Wahoo Killer $1.98 knives.....?

« Last Edit: January 30, 2017, 07:36:09 PM by hunter63 »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #30 on: January 30, 2017, 08:28:10 PM »
Thanks, guys, for the info.

That Wahoo looks suspiciously like my Mora Clipper.... Wonder if it performs as well?
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2017, 08:33:44 PM »
....
I remember them as well....from CVA.
Built the "Bowie" and the "Russel Green River" from the kits......did look at that Skinner.
Bowie...
http://cochisefirearms.net/product/2133/

Thanks for that link. Deja Vu from an earlier post, same vendor.

http://cochisefirearms.net/product/winchester-small-fixed-blade-knife-wood-handle/
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Offline hunter63

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #32 on: January 30, 2017, 09:37:40 PM »
Thanks, guys, for the info.

That Wahoo looks suspiciously like my Mora Clipper.... Wonder if it performs as well?

They are a "BIC" Mora....LOL

Well, have one next to my recliner, for mail, apples, potato chip bags, opening boxes, and finger nails.
Used to use a Mora #1, but dogs ate tha handle and sheath.....

Used one to clean my turkey last fall......
Currently may have 2 dozen scattered in every vehicle, boat, 4 wheeler, coat, tool box, screw drier rack,...stuck to posts just about any where.....
Actually one of the few knives I would baton...and not worry about.....and did use one to cut 1/4 half round strips off square.

At about $2.00 each, you could use them for tent stakes.....
Don't get me wrong ...love my Crashblades, and other custom knives, Mora's (old and new) Herters Green River....Old Hickory, Buck Knives, Schrade... etc, etc, etc..... ......
But these do have a place in my world.

http://www.chkadels.com/Wahoo-Killer-Knife-1038

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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #33 on: January 30, 2017, 11:22:39 PM »
They are a "BIC" Mora....LOL

....
Currently may have 2 dozen scattered in every vehicle, boat, 4 wheeler, coat, tool box, screw drier rack,...stuck to posts just about any where.....
Actually one of the few knives I would baton...and not worry about.....and did use one to cut 1/4 half round strips off square.

At about $2.00 each, you could use them for tent stakes........

 :lol: :rofl:
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Offline hunter63

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #34 on: January 30, 2017, 11:51:06 PM »
This was the kit I built used for 30 years as go to Rondy and primitive everything knife.

Lost for a year...and found last week.



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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #35 on: January 30, 2017, 11:54:39 PM »
This was the kit I built used for 30 years as go to Rondy and primitive everything knife.

Lost for a year...and found last week.


Good period design. Slab of steel, sharp on one edge, handle.  What more does a guy need?
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Offline Unknown

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #36 on: January 31, 2017, 12:35:15 AM »
This was the kit I built used for 30 years as go to Rondy and primitive everything knife.

Lost for a year...and found last week.



I thought it too much to ask. Your dedication to the thing made me wonder how it looked v. RusselGr. Thanks for the pic!

I could stab with that.

The ray grain on the handle reminds me again of the stock on my cvaky rifle.... yeah the one with the 2 piece stock. CVA, I'm sure, did make some things good. ( sounds like Trump making a clarification) obviously some of their merch bordered on the ridiculous, like kyrifle and some other things. The GR Hunter, how many more names did it have?

Offline hunter63

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Re: inexpensive bushcraft knives
« Reply #37 on: January 31, 2017, 07:44:06 AM »
These knife kits, horns possibles bags......as well as rifles shotguns, pistols, along with Dixie Gun Works.....did a lot fill in the need for merchandise that became popular because of he movie , Jeremiah Johnson, The mountain Men, The Alamo and few others.

Many people started on these inexpensive kits...and moved on to knife making as well a firearms up grades.

The original scales were set aside to make a custom set on that knife.
I had cut them out of a slab of cherry wood, worked down....using a hand belt sander, upside down in a vice to do the sanding...(use what you have?)
It caught and flew out of my hand, "sanding" the heal of my hand in the process....major road rash.

Finished it, ....taking it to the first, "primitive camp" in a baker tent,.. in my buckskins........fi nally getting my "Outfit" going.
Took it down to the hawk log.....was invited to the knife throw....threw it once...hit handle first...shattered!...
All my work and blood...that I was soooo proud of.....Gone......LO L

Pieces were committed to the Fire Gods that evening...with a group of friends (many of whom have "gone under")....along with the necessary dose of magic apple pie, and other mysterious offering in jugs.
 
Wrapped blade handle with leather lacing ...for a year or two..the used the pine(?) scales that came with it.

Relating that story...you can understand my feeling of loss...when it went missing...
And found!!!!
Early leather work...and Navy Arms revolver made from a kit.


 
 
 
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Offline Moe M.

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Another moderately inexpensive bush knife
« Reply #38 on: February 06, 2017, 06:00:11 AM »
  Another introduction in the world of relatively inexpensive Bushcraft specific knives that's getting allot of notice first abroad and now in the USA is imported by Boker Knives,  several online stores including Amazon are carrying the knife for sale.
  The maker calls it's company Real Steel which is a relatively new company,  but the parent company has been in the knife business for over fifteen years making folding tactical knives for the foreign market as most of their designs are automatic or quick opening folding knives that are outlawed in China.
  Real Steel will be concentrating on producing a line of sportsman's knives,  the Real Steel Bushcrafter came out in 2015 made in 440 C stainless and gained a pretty good reputation,  but calls for the company to make the knife available in Carbon steel prompted the company to try to achieve the best of both worlds, so in 2016 they began making their bush knife in D-2 tool steel with a Rockwell of 59~60, and renamed it the Bushcraft II.
  I honestly don't know how the company can make and market this knife for the price point they sell it for,  it's made of quality D-2 Steel, the blade is about 4-1/4" long, handle is the same for an over all length of 8-1/2" inches long,  the drop point blade is about 3/16" thick, the scales appear to be contoured very comfortably and are made of G-10 with red liners, the scales are glued and pinned, and it comes with a lanyard tube.
  The knife comes with a sheath made of Kydex and has a multi position belt clip,  there are allot of field test video reviews on line on this knife and all give it flowery reviews
 
  The selling price is about $60.00, Amazon's price today is south of $55.00 
 
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