Author Topic: not that long ago  (Read 640 times)

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Offline hayshaker

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not that long ago
« on: February 11, 2017, 08:24:05 PM »
i remember when my MIL was sill alive. i was asking her about the old days here in rural western MN.
as for electric this area did not recieve power utilities till the middle of the 1940's.
before that folks used windmills to pump water, candles for light wood and coal for the stove.
and everone canned food .durring the depression they would haul milk to town as we as eggs,
and trade for goods like coffee and other  goods        not produced on the farm.
many folks sewedthier own clothes, store ought clothes were speny and money was tight.
my wifes grandfather was a blacksmith. yes indeed the ol'days were something,
i kno many folks out here now that pretty much live that way .nowout here.
i found myselfdoing many of these things is damm hard work at times,
but the exerience and rewards were great.

Offline Pete Bog

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2017, 09:05:37 PM »
 I also grew up in Northwestern Minnesota. We got electric power in 1962, by then I was 11 years old. We were in a heavily wooded area and windmills did not work. Water was pumped by hand or a small gas engine was used to power the pump jack. Electric generators were call "Light Plants" and the standard through the '30's and 40's was 32 volts DC. We had a 32 volt DC light plant and there were 16 glass battery cells to be charged up to store the electricity. Each cell was a flooded lead acid battery, about 6x6x16 and rated at 2 volts each. They were connected in series to provide the 32 volt power. There were all manner of appliances designed for that power standard. Light bulbs, electric motors, clothes irons, etc. I saw all the equipment but never saw it in use. It had fallen by the wayside by the time I was old enough to remember such things. Refrigeration  was propane powered and quite small. Maybe 10 cubic foot. Radio was tube type, powered by dry cell. Catch the news, maybe a radio play in the evening and then it was off to conserve battery power. Lights were kerosene or Coleman lantern. Hand crank cream separator. Winter food storage was Ball and Mason jar canning and a root cellar. Aaah--- you get the picture. Been there done that, skills are rusty but I'm glad to have experienced it. 

Offline wolfy

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2017, 10:19:59 PM »
You guys are bringing back a lot of memories of my childhood on the farm here in Nebraska.  Those Wincharger systems were pretty popular around my neck of the woods because the factory in Sioux City, Iowa was just down the road about 25 miles from me.

Here's a pretty good source for information on them.... http://www.wincharger.com/
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Offline hayshaker

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2017, 06:33:09 AM »
well as for me     way back when i was just a youg pup we used to keep fire burning at the entrance
to the cave. It kept the bears away. we'd flintknap arrow and spear points at night.
then went hunting in the morning, yeah thats the ticket. fur clothing was the in thing then.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2017, 06:46:07 AM »
well as for me     way back when i was just a youg pup we used to keep fire burning at the entrance
to the cave. It kept the bears away. we'd flintknap arrow and spear points at night.
then went hunting in the morning, yeah thats the ticket. fur clothing was the in thing then.

 Well, you sure got Wolfy beat.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline hayshaker

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2017, 06:57:07 AM »
there's  movie called sweetland it was filmed right here. it's a movie about farm  life in
post ww1 rural mn. low budget but very well done. if you wan to see farm life durng that era
i highly reccomend this film. the land they plowed in the movie belongs to a nieghbor,
as well as the house that oleg torvik lived in.

Offline xj35s

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2017, 07:05:33 AM »
Too funny Hayshaker. Your screen name sort of tells a different story. HA,HA,!!

I love hearing these things. It is hard for me to fathom my great grandfather living in the 1800's. It seems so long ago.

My Maternal Great grand mother was a full blooded Mohawk Indian. It's like she didn't exist. It was still taboo to marry a redskin then.

I saw a sign in North Syracuse yesterday, First plank road built in the U.S. in 1846. Yup! for horse and buggy!!
pessimist complain about the wind. optimist expect the wind to change. realist adjusts the sails.

Offline hayshaker

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2017, 07:15:39 AM »
xj35 the post fire at the cave as you know was satire,
i grew upwith indoor plumbing..

Offline Moe M.

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2017, 07:59:49 AM »
there's  movie called sweetland it was filmed right here. it's a movie about farm  life in
post ww1 rural mn. low budget but very well done. if you wan to see farm life durng that era
i highly reccomend this film. the land they plowed in the movie belongs to a nieghbor,
as well as the house that oleg torvik lived in.
  LOL,  Thanks,  I grew up in the '40's and '50's,  farms were everywhere back then,  we had electricity and town water,  but I knew people who didn't in my area,  outhouses were still common,  most farms and gardens were turned by tractor power,  but mules were still used to pull plows.
  My folks and grand parents kept a root cellar and canned veggies in Mason jars, also put up preserves and made their own salt pork in large crocks,  my grand parents used a real ice box up until the '50's,  the Ice Man came twice a week,  the local pig farmer picked up the swill from "honey" buckets we kept in the ground in the backyard with a horse drawn wagon once a week,  the Rag man also bought and sold rags by the pound from a horse drawn wagon with a big old scale hanging off the side,  we also had a bread man and a milk man who delivered a couple of times a week,  one of my uncles had a small dairy farm, he was pretty modern for his time,  I would often ride with him in his chain drive Reo delivery truck,  he carried raw milk in five gallon milk cans and refilled customers bottles with a ladle from the milk cans.
  Most of the roads in town were still graveled,  we had three general stores, and one hardware store in our town, most no bigger than todays average living room,  the feed and grain store was pretty big though,  and we had a huge Ice House in town,  my dad's first job at 11 years old was driving a team of horses pulling sleds of cut ice off the lake not for from the ice house.

  Actually,  living was physically harder back then,  but it was also less stressful and simpler, in many ways it was easier,   neighbors helped each other in times of need,  kids were kept busy learning to be self reliant and to be responsible,  people coped with life much differently, ours was a more personal world in many ways,  almost all news was local,  we had news papers and we had radio, and we had books, sand lot baseball, built forts in the woods, made camps, built down hill racers, and fished and hunted after school and after chores were done,  families were closer and had allot more time to spend together back then,  truth be told ( I know that some people didn't have it as well as I did) I could do without the electronic gadgets we think make our lives easier, do without todays politics,  high taxes, costly permits,  and power hungry officials,  I could do without cable TV, microwave ovens and Ninja blenders,  I'd trade it all for the days when my phone didn't ring fifteen times a day from callers I don't know trying to sell me stuff I don't need,  or stand in line at a super market check out while someone shuffles through discount coupons and argues with the clerk that their credit card is still good, TRY IT AGAIN. eeerrrrrr

  There more,  but I've gone on too long already.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2017, 08:42:56 AM »
You guys are bringing back a lot of memories of my childhood on the farm here in Nebraska.  Those Wincharger systems were pretty popular around my neck of the woods because the factory in Sioux City, Iowa was just down the road about 25 miles from me.

Here's a pretty good source for information on them.... http://www.wincharger.com/

Thanks for posting that site Wolfy. 

A friend of ours lived out by the Montana and South Dakota border when she was a youngster.  Her father had a general store and bar/restaurant North of Alzada Montana.  He sold those Winchargers to a lot of folks back in the days before you could get "store bought electricity" in most of the rural areas around here.  They ran the lights and a radio.  As Moe notes, life was simpler in those days and there is a feeling of nostalgia in looking back on that time.  I read about the men who died young, a lot of them from heart attacks, about women were wore out when they were forty, and about a lot of kids didn't make it to their teens.  Those who did make it all the way to old age have good memories of life on the farm or at the general store. 

For the folks that like to live out in the remote areas Winchargers would still make sense today. 
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2017, 06:00:51 PM »
  Thanks Hayshaker, for the "Sweetwater" Correction, "Sweetland" movie reference. I just watched it.
Very good!
 :)


 :thumbsup: 5X
 ;)


  My parents grew up in the "Hoover times"/Depression. Dad was born in '23 & Ma in '24. Dad was born in a log cabin just outside West Augusta, Va.. Dad is buried +/- 500 yds from his birthplace, in W.Augusta Cemetery. Ma was born in a one room place on the outskirts of Staunton, Va. just West of where Gypsy Hill Park is. Just off Grubert Ave, and a little more than a block up from Hwy. 250 that heads West to W. Augusta. They went to Robert E.Lee High school together.. Ended up being married, honorably. Dad was in the Navy in WWII.. Then, there were children....


 I was just out there to see them both in August of last year. Dad passed away in '84. Ma is still alive & not kickin', but sure enough raising Cain when need be, at 92, goin on 93 in June. She is one helluva gal, even now. ;) Bless her heart.




  Tough times they went through, & tough folks did it without much complaint. It was just "Doin'", and some , "get 'er done".


  Thanks for the link to the movie'  made me remember my folks & how they were the "Greatest Generation" in most folks eyes, & the ones who came before them might have even been tougher & better.


  If you are under 80 or so, you had it good, compared to them & the ones before, IMO....


We are all blessed in one way or the other. But we sure have to give a hand to the ones who came before us..
 ;) 


Edit: Put the wrong name of the movie... :shrug:  I do like "Sweet water", though. ;-)


« Last Edit: February 14, 2017, 07:11:02 PM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Unknown

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2017, 06:54:46 PM »
I'll be looking for that movie; is it Sweetwater or Sweetland, one word?

"We" could take our new tech, develop new and better tech, and still have a place or lifestyle very similar to the one Moe described. Those stories sound good to me, though I don't think the difference then and now is because electronics.

One person bouncing out to live off the grid, that's great, just not a solution imho.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2017, 07:09:28 PM »



I corrected it... See above if it matters. ;)

I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Unknown

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2017, 07:52:45 PM »
That makes it easy. Thanks.

Offline Unknown

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Re: not that long ago
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2017, 06:30:42 PM »
there's  movie called sweetland it was filmed right here. it's a movie about farm  life in
post ww1 rural mn. low budget but very well done. if you wan to see farm life durng that era
i highly reccomend this film. the land they plowed in the movie belongs to a nieghbor,
as well as the house that oleg torvik lived in.

I had some trouble getting attached to it, the characters. I didn't understand their corn harvesting either.