Author Topic: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...  (Read 6729 times)

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Offline MnSportsman

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What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out... Bushcrafting/Camping/etc...??


I know this could be a one viewpoint to another , such as "minimalist", to "all out gotta have everything" type subject. But , I seriously would like to know your thoughts on "how much is too much"?


    The reason I am asking is that all the time I see "new" & "improved" gear being pushed for people to purchase & carry out in the woods/bush. & I am of the mind that people get this stuff & don't realize how much it weighs & just how much do ya need to carry out & have fun, survive, etc.


I am going to use one example, but do not take offense that I use these particular types of gear & how I use this analogy/example. It is just something I am using to try to explain what I am talking about here...


Why have a compass & map, then have a GPS both? When the first ones are lighter in weight for the most part, does basically the same job, do not need batteries/recharger, & less likely to get damaged & still work, & from what I understand, both require about the same amount of study to use them properly...


Along the same lines... Why a coffee pot and also a metal container to cook in, when ya can boil water & make coffee in either, but the metal container is a lot easier to also use to cook & possible eat out of...
I hope ya get the idea of what I am asking here.


This topic is not about the merits of compass/map vs GPS. Or coffeepot/metal container...
 It is about at what point do "You" think that it is "Too much stuff/gear" to carry. It could be types of cookware, clothing, cordage/rope, etc. I think I am explaining what I am asking well enough.. I hope so.
;)


I know that many people have more gear than they actually need to carry in their rigs/packs. Also many have the option of choosing more than one rig/pack based on different things. But there is only so much room & so many accessory pouches, etc. till the weight gets unmanageable to carry. I think, redundancy can be a good thing, or counter-productive if ya carry a bunch of gear that you are not likely to use in the the first place, let alone the second "redundant" one.


So using the mindset that, "He's got everything ya can think of in that rig/pack, prolly including the kitchen sink" , is a good way of thinking, regarding what I am talking & asking about.


So, "How much is too much" to carry"?

I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline jontok

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When I'm having trouble carrying the pack for as far as I need to on a particular trip, THEN there's too much stuff in it. ;D
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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I'd say once you have the bare minimum to survive, then you can begin adding comfort items until the weight becomes uncomfortable (defeating the purpose of adding comfort items). ;)

Offline hushnel

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This is another subject that is heavily influenced by location. Like the compass vs GPS. Here in Florida the land is so flat that we really don't have landmarks to guild our navigation, we can roughly determine direction if the sun is visible, even topo maps have very few points of reference. The GPS will give the lat and log so you can determine your location on the topo map. But the GPS is a device that can fail so you do have to carry a compass as back up.

Imagine canoeing the mangrove around Everglades City with just a compass, For sure it can be done but you are going to spend a lot of time making entry's into the log.

We gotta have water, particularly when in the coastal flood plains. Some kind of bug net most of the year, shelter, I find the hammock pretty handy. A rain poncho or tarp for the sun as well as the tropical storms. One pot is good, food, but it's easy to rely on fishing with some dehydrated backup. Of course in a canoe it's not hard to carry extra stuff. Walking in at least a third of the weight is water, unless you can process clean water. It always seems to come down to more weight equals more convenience which equals time and energy. It becomes a fine line often determined by location.

But like the fire starter thread it will be interesting to see what is considered necessary according to locations.

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Offline kanukkarhu

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Back home, growing up, when we were out and about and wanted a boil up, we would take a big tin can and a coat hanger (used to be made outta wire, you know;)) and cobble a billy can together. One of us would carry it in. When we got to our spot, we'd use the billy for a boil up, and then after lunch (usually sandwiches and some kind of meat roasted over the fire), we'd cut off a branch in an obvious place and hang the billy upside down on the stub there for the next time we (or someone else) happened along.  And other than knife, matches, foil emerg blanket, compass (usually just to tell general direction in bad weather), and a re/-purposed juice container of water in our canvass packs (those old Woods green ones you can't find anymore), that was pretty much it. Oh, we always carried string of some kind too. Oh, and each had a
plain old mug according to what you had that was best suited for the pack. I don't recall one stainless or titanium cup...

All this other stuff I got now seems sometimes to be a result of... I dunno what. Hobby? Greed? Consumerism?

When is it too much? When you are burdened down and can't enjoy the journey. Most of my weight comes from water these days.

EDIT: Lots of stuff made a one way trip: old canoes, lawn chairs, mill felt for stands/shelter. We just carted stuff in and left it for next time. People were considered welcome to use it, as long as they cared for it. Sometimes, some snot would swipe stuff and we'd growl and dance about it, but not that often, really....
« Last Edit: May 20, 2012, 01:52:36 PM by kanukkarhu »
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Offline rogumpogum

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I'm working on this conundrum currently, and I think PW has the right idea.
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Offline Gurthy

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For me "too much" is when all the stuff you are carrying with you detracts from enjoying the outing or you feel like you're carrying it for a reason that is not your own.

I always seem to carry too many cutting tools  :shocked: Blasphemy, I know. I used to always have the cutting tool trifecta with me, even on short day trips: a hatchet, a folding saw and a knife (or three). They were necessary when i was gathering materials for bow drills, carving, etc., but most of the time I had to make excuses to use them so I could justify carrying them. That was too much like work. Since spring hit I've left the hatchet and saw behind (for daytrips, not overnighters)... I just do make many fires when it is warm out so why shlep them around? To fulfill the interweb's image of a proper bushcrafter? No thanks to that but a big "thank you" to my fellow B&B members for encouraging me to get back to my roots and just enjoy the outdoors again!

The ultralight backpackers may be onto something with this advise that I've seen in a few places:
Every time you return from a trip empty your pack and then make two piles of gear. Put all of the gear you used on the trip into one pile along with your first aid kit and your survival/emergency kit (which you hopefully didn't use)....this is your keep pile. Put all of the other stuff into another pile... that is your leave behind next time pile. After a few trips you'll be down to the bare essentials. Of course some common sense must be applied here. A lightweight extra layer is sensible, for example, even if you didn't need it last time out. Make adjustments for weather and seasons, etc.

Offline OutdoorEnvy

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I honestly have my basics and besides food and water amounts nothing changes much.  I only rethink what I'm taking if I noticed the weight being a problem on an outing.  If I'm going to be doing a lot of hiking I ditch my old rucksack for my hunting pack that carries more weight a lot better and is just flat out more comfortable with a heavy load.  I haven't gotten into a minimalist mindset.  If I don't use an item in three trips and it doesn't serve an emergency function I will take it out.  So I probably have slimmed down a little over the years. 
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Offline upthecreek

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I try not to over analyze my gear. I carry as much as I can for the situation I'm entering. I put my comfort first.
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Offline MATT CHAOS

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I try not to over analyze my gear. I carry as much as I can for the situation I'm entering. I put my comfort first.

+1  I try to make my outings comfortable but on the reverse, I do not try to pack everything and the kitchen sink.  If it is just me I go simple.  If my kids come along, I make sure they are more than comfortable so that they continue to want to camp and not get "scared" off from it.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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I just weighed my purse... holy crap... its 8.5 lbs.    I couldnt figure out why it was so heavy.. dug inside and at the bottom of the black hole was a can of pop... 

And yes.. I have a cresent wrench in there too... pliers... fire kit...  foodstuff for Hubby if sugars get low.. tons of things for tinder. 


I could live out of this thing...  ha ha ha...

So I think this means I can have a overly stuffed possibles bag and be just fine...  :)   

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Red

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Madmax can attest... if it fits in the canoe, it goes.. if it doesnt fit in the canoe, it goes in someone else canoe :P

i always make sure at the beginning of packing, that i have a container (my canteen) a pot (canteen cup) paracord, a saw and my trail hawk.. after those items are in my pack, then ill start cramming in there. once its full, i cram in some more stuff and i am ready to go :)

everyone's packs are different.. some are load bearing, and some are all you. when i put my pack on, and i can feel my circulation getting cut off in my shoulders, i go back through and start taking things out until its comfortable to wear.

we all bring crap to make life easier in the bush, and when it really boils down to it, (myself included here) we could all probably make due with only half or less of the stuff we bring on trips.
"Big drama next few hours.. But whatever happens, no matter what they tell you.. Don't let 'em take them chains off me.."

Online madmax

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Madmax can attest... if it fits in the canoe, it goes.. if it doesnt fit in the canoe, it goes in someone else canoe :P

LMAO

we all bring crap to make life easier in the bush, and when it really boils down to it, (myself included here) we could all probably make due with only half or less of the stuff we bring on trips.

I seldom go minimalist anymore.  Been there done that.  The exception wil be this fall/winter, if it works out, on a trip with a few close friends ( 'cause we can!  :))  Stay tuned for that.  So every load out now is technically "Too Much".  Don't care.  I've been hypothermic, hypoglycemic, bug bitten, hungry, injured, and wet more times than I can remember in the woods.  Heck, I thought for awhile that you HAD to suffer to be an "experienced" outdoorsman.  (God, I was young and dumb!).  I don't feel the need to "test" myself much anymore.  I like to "smooth it". 

"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There".  :)
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 06:54:32 AM by madmax »
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Offline C3 Knives

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Lot's of good comments. I say it varies to the situation. Car camping you get the kitchen sink and back packing the packing is a bit more reserved. i tend to carry more than many would consider needed, but I will not leave my thermalounger chair behind. I like my seat out in the woods. It get's old sitting on a log.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Thnx for the replies so far!
:)


I guess I should put in my "view" here.
:)


I try to carry only what I need for the particular type of trip duration, & seasonal adjustments. In all of my rigs/packs I carry , a small First Aid Kit(FAK), PSK, one fixed blade(spare), a blue tin enamel cup, a seal-able SS container, a compass(mostly only in un-familar areas), a firekit, some gloves,bandanna, & some hanks of cordage. (I think that is about it for basics. I may have forgotten to list something or 2, but ya get the drift)
 Then as the duration/season changes, I add gear to fit the circumstances. I also change rig/pack size as needed. But I limit myself a lot, since I like to make what I need, when I need it, from what is available. One thing that comes to mind as an "extra" for me, is headlamps & flashlights. When I am going to be out over-nite, I only carry a small maglite & a headlamp; Along with only one set of spare batteries for each. Nothing large/heavy. Just basic small stuff. I tend to not do much traveling at night anymore, so I have reduced my gear to that effect. That is it for electric/tronics. Everything else I carry is "utilitarian", for the best word I can think of right now. I try to only carry what I think I will "Need", & nothing else. except perhaps a book on wild edibles/medicinals &/or a woodscraft book or something like that, to read & maybe practice skills I haven't learned well enuff for my satisfaction. (Note: I , like many of you am still learning new things all the time too. Particularly with regions I am not familiar with.) So, basically, I would say I am some type of "minimalist". As far as cooking stuff goes, a USGI canteen cup, a tin cup I mentioned, sometimes a SS pot, & a old B.S. cook kit, would be added as duration lengthened. That is about it for cooking, since I can make do with that. I do have cast iron pan about 6-8" across, but it is heavier than I really want, so I don't carry it anymore. Sometimes I carry a poncho, tarp, (altho sometimes a small tent), survival blanket, a knee/butt pad, & some other misc. small stuff, depending on duration/season also. Then other than food & water, & some extra changes of clothing(Socks I almost always carry a min. of 2 extra pair.), that s about it for me & am happy with just carrying that. Anything else becomes un-necessary. (again, I may have forgotten to list something "important" here, but I am trying to make a point , not necessarily a "list". ;) )


Nevertheless, as I said, I am still somewhat of a type of "minimalist" when I go into the sticks on foot. Not saying this type is for everyone, but at this time, It suits "me". Vehicle camping is a different story. Radio, big cooler for the ice/beer/adult beverages/ice, cast iron cookware, chairs/ etc.. & if we bring one of the watercraft. there's more yet.. ;)


That is basically my "view". Glad to see what others are saying!
Thnx for chiming in here!
:D
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline zammer

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"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There".  :)


I don't think I could sum it up any better than that!... thats about the most sig worthy bushcrafting quote I've ever read, and applies to so much more as well...lol
"big fish like to live in bad places, that's how they get to be big fish"

Online madmax

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"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There".  :)


I don't think I could sum it up any better than that!... thats about the most sig worthy bushcrafting quote I've ever read, and applies to so much more as well...lol

Feel free to use it bro. :)
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
Hunter S, Thompson

Offline Mr. Tettnanger

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"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There".  :)


I don't think I could sum it up any better than that!... thats about the most sig worthy bushcrafting quote I've ever read, and applies to so much more as well...lol


+1!!!!!

Offline zammer

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"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There".  :)


I don't think I could sum it up any better than that!... thats about the most sig worthy bushcrafting quote I've ever read, and applies to so much more as well...lol

Feel free to use it bro. :)

I shall, thanks madmax
"big fish like to live in bad places, that's how they get to be big fish"

Offline werewolf won

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I've done the canteen cup and a knife, plus what is between your ears with Uncle.  It was almost fun when I was twenty.  I'd not want to repeat that drill today. To that end I always bring a minimum amount of gear, even on a simple fishing trip.  You hear the old mantra that knowledge weighs nothing.  Well, it doesn't, and I know how to make a knife from a stone, and I also know how long it takes and how much energy is needed to do that.  I'd rather take the knife, I'm old and don?t have that much time left to waste :D

I also don't have the healthy back I had as a kid, so I keep the pack weight around 20 pounds max (water, food fuel etc. included).  I'm not an ultralighter, but I am mighty gram stingy with what I'll bring.

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« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 09:18:06 AM by werewolf won »
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Offline kanukkarhu

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I should add that my response above was formulated thinking about hunting, fishing... day stuff.

Overnighters here almost always, in my world, involve a tent and lots of gear, since it involves driving or boating out to a nice spot for the weekend.  The exception I can think about is a canoe trip with a bunch of portages.  Personally, I've not done a long, multi-day canoe trip - and I'm not the only one I know of like that.  Growing up, many of us actually thought that these long, multiple portage-y canoe trips were for city folk and tourists who didn't live here... you know, "becoming one with nature" kinda thing.  Strange but true. (I don't think that anymore, FYI.)

Also, all this light and ultralight stuff - for me - is a fairly recent 'discovery', and is more about comfort than grams and ounces.

Anyway, I'm trying to clarify that camping - from a canoe or a vehicle, involves as much comfort as desired.  I too am older than I was 20 years ago, and being in my forties has caused some slowing down of body as well as made me smarter and more interested in comfort.

Good thread MN.


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Offline Wood Trekker

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Well, for me, I first figured out what things I need/want to have with me. I then started cutting them down, and replacing them with lighter items, while still keeping the same components. My three season base weight is about 18lb. My winter base weight is about 25lb.

Offline MnSportsman

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Whether you folks realize it or not... From the Catskills to the Swamps of the Everglades; & from the Blue Ridge & Smokys, to the Sierra Nevada & the Cascades of Washington, The Brooks Range of Alaska to the Sierra Madre.. Or anywhere else in the world ya want to name...


The stuff you are adding from your experiences here, help out many who do not post, or are not even members of B&B. ( Might even get a new member too! ;) )


You are providing Information to help anyone who looks for it, all over the world.That's the great thing about the internet...
:D

Anytime we can help each other learn new things... It's great!

Thnx for sharing your thoughts & knowledge...

It is likely helping folks ya don't even know, to learn more & have fun Outdoors!

Keep the ball rollin', folks!
:thumbsup:

:D


« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 05:48:32 PM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline MATT CHAOS

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"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There".  :)


I don't think I could sum it up any better than that!... thats about the most sig worthy bushcrafting quote I've ever read, and applies to so much more as well...lol


+1!!!!!

+2
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Offline wolfy

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #24 on: March 22, 2017, 10:57:35 AM »
This old thread from JB (I hope bumping it doesn't incur his wrath!) ;D is worth reading or even adding to by both newer and older members, but this quote from MadMax is pure brilliance and worth cutting in stone....

"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There"  :hail:
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Offline hunter63

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #25 on: March 22, 2017, 12:00:47 PM »
This old thread from JB (I hope bumping it doesn't incur his wrath!) ;D is worth reading or even adding to by both newer and older members, but this quote from MadMax is pure brilliance and worth cutting in stone....

"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There"  :hail:

Was reading along...seeing names I hadn't seen in a long time, or didn't know they were a part of this forum....Looked a the date...and kinda laughed.

Seems thing haven't changed much...except getting older and not want to hump too much gear.
"Onemorething-ites" is always part of it....and the fun.

Forces a decision on yeh or neh......add till you can't carrying it any more, the dump and start over.

I have seen the drill about working up your load out,..... then sort in piles when you get back...and see what you can leave behind that you didn't use.....
That rarely works.....When you leave it behind....FOR SURE you will need it....I you carry it YOU WON"T NEED IT"

I agree with Max's quote....
"Too Much" is when the "Gettin' There" ain't worth the "Bein' There.....
but would look at the the other way around....

"Too much" is when the "Bein' there ain't worth the "Gettin"  There....

 
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2017, 04:40:17 PM »
  LOL,  I was fooled also in thinking this was a new thread,  but it is as pertinent today as it was a hundred years ago.

  When I was in my prime I carried allot of stuff I never used but thought would come in handy,  I really can't say when weight became an issue,  I do remember buying a new pack,  after getting it loaded up and trying it on I realized that it wasn't as comfortable as my old one,  for one thing it was a little smaller than my old one and the same load out I was accustomed to tended to over stuff the new one.
  I then started taking out the things I never used,  that helped, so I took out the stuff I almost never used and it fit me allot better,  next went the redundant stuff,  I figure when I stared my mild weather pack weight was close to 40 pounds inc. food and water,  the reduction brought it down to 24 pounds.
 That was a couple of years ago, since then age and PAD has caused me to cut even more weight,  to accomplish this I've had to replace heavier items with lighter gear,  Anodized Aluminum and Titanium replaced stainless steel, urethane coated tarps were replaced by silnylon,  my Hiker Pro water filter got traded for a Sawyer Mini,  I used to carry too much food including a few canned foods, cutting out the excess cut the weight down further.
 I used to carry allot of paracord,  today I carry a small spool of tarred bank line, it's cheaper, weighs less, and is just as strong.
 I also went to owning several packs, a small one for a day out fishing or hunting, a medium sized pack for bushcraft day hikes,  and a med/large pack for overnight trips,  each pack stays loaded except for food, water, and extra clothes in cold weather,  my rule of thumb is 5 pounds for a days fishing or hunting, 10 pounds for buchcraft day hikes and woods bumming,  and 20 pounds for over night trips,  I carry the same gear as my day pack except for the added weight of a little more food, my hammock, sleeping bag, and bigger tarp.

  For me,  too much is a pack weight of over 20 pounds in total.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2017, 03:38:17 AM »
Wolfy,
 IMO, The topic is still worth something now as well as 5 years ago. Maybe it will get some more posts like Hunter63 & Moe M. 's replies, since we have more members now.


 I still think it is a good one, anyway.
:)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2017, 06:36:34 AM »
Wolfy,
 IMO, The topic is still worth something now as well as 5 years ago. Maybe it will get some more posts like Hunter63 & Moe M. 's replies, since we have more members now.


 I still think it is a good one, anyway.
:)

 I agree JB,  it's become a topic I've had great interest in over the last decade or so,  medical issues such a PAD and arthritis in my feet and legs have limited not only how far I can walk,  but also what kind of country I can hike and how much weight I can carry comfortably.
 Deciding what gear (is too much) to bring with you can be challenging once you've gotten rid of the obvious stuff you can do without,  some of the things that are big contributors weight wise are tools, cookware, water, food, and shelter including ones sleep system.
 Obviously, food and water can be trimmed a bit but not by much,  tools are a good place to start,  environment has a lot to do with tool choice,  here in New England there's no shortage of water,  all it takes is heat, chemicals, or a water filter to have good clean drinking water,  fire wood is also abundant in my area of the country, so unless you're building a base camp you don't really need wood processing tools such as an axe and saw,  you can get by with a stout knife,  if one lives in the deep south or Pacific NW tool selection may be very different.
  Choosing a pack is one way to force ones self to go more minimalist,  it's human nature to fill voids, the bigger your pack,  the more you'll find to put into it,  when I bought my first dedicated bushcraft pack it was a 32 liter bag, then I picked up a medium Alice pack,  both are big packs best suited for multi day trips,  most average day packs are big enough for overnight adventures in my opinion.
  My actual bag for day trips is a Maxpedition jumbo versipack shoulder bag,  it carries everything I need for a full day in the woods and enough gear to keep me comfortable in mild weather for an extended stay in an emergency,  it carries easy and weighs about 10 pounds with food and water.
  I'll be keeping an eye on this thread, I hope it continues to grow.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline hunter63

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #29 on: March 23, 2017, 09:08:55 AM »
For me...part of the fun is coming up with your pack .

You make your plans for yoru pack/bag/kits....based on past experience, goals, and conditions....then gather and purchase gear...(the other fun part"

Now it's try it out time......Did it work out like you thought?
If not, why not?
The do it again...

Seems things don't change in 5 years, and really haven't for 60 years of thinking planning, buying, making, packing using...over and over.

As we get older we don't like to carry as much,.. move as fast,... or as far......But can afford better and lighter gear.

Just a side note...when packing wood processing gear for a short outing.....

If one carries and axe, why would you need a saw?
Unless you are build in Homestead.
I have seen so may You Tubes when people are cutting a stack of fire wood with a saw?.....So the stack has even ends....What?

If you can't break it...burn it in half.

Sometime I think the interwebs have caused more back problems with all sorts of gear, you never knew you needed, or could afford.....because some on pictured a "day pack" with 3 knives, axe and a saw

I onlty carry a folding saw to quartering big game>
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline xj35s

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #30 on: April 01, 2017, 01:38:14 PM »
I just weighted the bag I did a review on. It's 15 lbs according to the bathroom scale. That's with my stuff and two 23 OZ water bottles. Add a 4lb sleeping bag and a foam mat, It's still a reasonable carry weight.

I could lighten up my mess kit, it's 1 lb but has the things I want for cooking.
pessimist complain about the wind. optimist expect the wind to change. realist adjusts the sails.

Offline Punty

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #31 on: April 04, 2017, 07:12:59 PM »
  When you can't carry any more, it's too much. >:D

  Seriously.

   For my particular situation, 90% of the time, I am going out to get some exercise, and play with my boy toys and sharp things, and have a nice cup of coffee. So, carrying the weight adds to my cardio exercise, and having all of my toys with me makes it more fun.

   Aside from that....if you had to Bug Out for any reason, the more you can haul the better, for the same reason having a pickup truck would be better than having a smart car.

  For me, it's about 40 pounds for dayhike....give or take 10 pounds for water.
If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
Ecclesiastes 10:10

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #32 on: April 05, 2017, 06:33:29 PM »
This is a good topic to have revived.

One way of doing it is to pack everything you think you might need, then when you get back from your trip, take everything out that you didn't use, and don't bring that stuff the next time.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2017, 08:42:05 AM »
  I hope this thread continues to revive itself for several reasons,  one being that in my opinion we need more constructive conversations going that deal more with actually getting out and practicing our woodland skills,  for some reason we seem to be posting more about shop crafts than about trail and camp craft.

  Anyhow,  Spring is finally here,  things are greening up and the woods are drying up some after the late season snows and March rains,  I'm a mild weather camper,  at my age winters are best spent indoors and close to the heat,  spring and fall are the times of the year that I get to enjoy the woods,  summers aren't bad either when the humidity is fairly low.
  So it's that time of the year to go through my packs, check my gear and make adjustments,  and treat my woods clothes and gear against the deer ticks in my area, the word is they're going to be worse than ever this year and the thought of contacting the Lymes illness scares the hell out of me.
  I don't know if I'll be successful in getting my pack weight down much over what it was last season but it's a goal that I'm looking forward to,  going from a bigger day trip back pack to a smaller shoulder bag really helped me to consider what I carry and why,  I still have every thing I need to enjoy my time in the woods, but making adjustments because of limited space has reduced my pack weight from a little over 20 pounds to about 12 pounds including food, my water bottle when full adds another two pounds.
 Some things I am weighing in my mind to lighten my load even more is the tools that I carry that while handy to have once in a while actually don't get used all too often,  for example, I carry a SAK Farmer knife and a Buck Lite multi tool,  both are light weight, both have good knife blades, decent saw blades, can openers, cap lifters, and awls which I use fairly often,  the buck multi tools a has plier head and a nice file which I almost never need,  I may ditch the multi tool and keep the SAK Farmer which would take another 8 ounces out of my pack.
 I also carry a folding Stainless steel trowel (camp shovel),  again it comes in handy for digging cat holes, clearing fire pits, and moving hot coals for cooking,  actually I could make a digging stick in camp that would do the same thing, just not as easily,  but it's another 8 ounces I could shed,  I love my Stainless steel water bottles, but never use them on the fire,  a Gator Aid bottle would carry the same amount of water and weigh less.
 I carry a Sawyer Mini water filter kit for emergencies,  but I still boil my drinking water when I need to replenish my water bottle or for cooking,  I think the filter kit weighs about 6 ounces,  do I really need to carry it every time I go out for a day trip ?
 Another consideration is my First Aid kit,  It's an Adventure Medical Kit that's pretty extensive yet compact, and I've added more meds, a small Bic lighter and a few other survival items to it,  I think it weighs about a pound and gets switched from pack to pack depending on which pack I'm using,  while nice to have,  again I've never had to use it,  maybe I could get by with a few band aids, a little duck tape, and a little first aid cream ?

  Comments welcomed,  more later.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #34 on: April 20, 2017, 10:36:24 PM »

  What about tools,  how much is too much,  some folks I've read have hiked the whole AT carrying nothing more than a SAK for a cutting tool,  I know one guy personally who often goes out solo for a few days in the woods and doesn't even carry a pocket knife,  he finds chert or agate and break it up for sharp chards which he fastens with cordage made of fine roots to a short stick and makes a serviceable knife.
  I'm not that sophisticated or that industrious,  I like to use quality tools that are more or less job specific,  Woodlore styled knives,  Laplander type folding saws,  hatchets and bushcraft sized axes,  normally I carry a fixed blade on my belt and a folding saw in my pack,  I very rarely carry an axe or bucksaw unless I'm making a semi permanent camp or putting some campfire wood up for future use.
  I'm one of those guys like that mentioned earlier in this thread who likes his wood cut to length with flat ends that make batoning or splitting campfire wood safer and easier,  so my folding saws get used often,  In guess what you carry for tools like everything else depends on your particular needs and your willingness and ability to carry the extra weight,  BTW,  I think an axe and a saw work very well together, why restrict one's self to either or ?
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline John Van Gelder

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #35 on: April 26, 2017, 07:34:49 AM »
Probably there are no right or wrong answers, a better question is what is enough, and that changes according to where you are going, the time of the year and how long you plan to stay there.

When I lived in Alaska, I would drive my Land Cruiser as far as I could up some old road and then start hiking, everything went into an old ruck sack I had. I never carried a tent just a sleeping bag, and most of my food was foraged.  I camped under white spruce, no need for a tent, I carried a .44 magnum with some .44 spls., for small game. 

Those were some of my best camping trips, I woke up one night in the Chugach mountains, with a full moon shinning over the top of the next ridge, to the sound of a pack of wolves serenading the night.   

It doesn't get better than that. ..

Online madmax

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #36 on: April 26, 2017, 08:18:25 AM »
Due to my mobility problems and my procrastination of surgeries I dug out my old UL gear for this summer.  I'm sure that I cannot dirtbag it on the ground on an overnight without an infl. pad but I am getting longer day hikes in.  So my "too much" will be quite different nowadays.  I hope to do some backcountry overnights that you can paddle into in the GSNF.  That will allow me some luxuries.  We'll see.

Anyway my list doesn't start with bag and pad.  It starts with stool and cane.  LOL.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
Hunter S, Thompson

Offline John Van Gelder

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #37 on: April 26, 2017, 09:25:58 AM »
Aging is not for the faint of heart.  We all age at different rates, purely through chance and genetics.  I know people 40 who are older then I.

I am in the forest every day, usually walking 3-5 miles, not so much last winter with the very deep snow I had.  I had a very nice morning last week and did a little 10 mile walk. 

The point being "use it or loose it",  if you don't keep going, the next thing you know is that you can't. 

My hat is off to Max, in spite of adversity he is "pressing on".. So "God" bless, and keep on you will prevail..

How much do you need, the answer is nothing.  A close friend of mine, and Master Chief I worked for in the Navy, had a friend that had for some reason or another gotten stranded on an island in the Pacific during WW II.  The island was occupied by the Japanese, so he managed to avoid their patrols until the island was "liberated".  He lived on what he could find.  He told my friend that "you do not know what you can get by on until you have to"..

What do you need, nothing but the right mind set.

Mind set is everything, I know of instances of policemen who were shot with only minor injuries, but because they were shot they knew they would die..it became a self fulfilling prophesy. 

 

 

Offline wsdstan

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #38 on: April 26, 2017, 09:46:44 AM »
Use it or lose it doesn't apply to knee joints or hip joints.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline John Van Gelder

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #39 on: April 26, 2017, 09:52:08 AM »
A close friend of mine rode a horse through the side of a barn, she ended up under the horse, and had to have she hip replaced, she and I used to do 20 mile hikes together.

I guess the joint thing depends on how good the replacements are.

Offline wolfy

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #40 on: April 26, 2017, 10:46:07 AM »
I have had both hips replaced and surgery on both knees.  The hips feel great, but the surgeon warned me that through attrition or overuse,  I would probably need a knee replacement on one of them in ten years.  That was about 30 years ago.  Consequently, I am no longer kneeling in my canoes or packing both an 18.5 foot canoe plus a 50 pound Duluth pack over 1 1/2 mile portages, either.   It goes both ways. :coffee:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
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Offline John Van Gelder

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #41 on: April 26, 2017, 12:15:45 PM »
Wolfy

No .. It only goes one way, things just get worse with time. 

Offline wolfy

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #42 on: April 26, 2017, 02:37:11 PM »
Thanks for the words of encouragement, John! :rofl:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrea.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline John Van Gelder

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #43 on: April 26, 2017, 03:08:02 PM »
Sorry .. But reality is..!

Offline crashdive123

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #44 on: April 26, 2017, 06:47:55 PM »

Offline woodsrunner

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Re: What are your thoughts on "how much is too much?" to carry when out...
« Reply #45 on: April 26, 2017, 09:09:19 PM »
I myself do most of my training in the late winter through spring...these are rucks starting at five miles working up to eighteens...my pack weight between 35 in spring-up to 45 or 50 lbs (using steel plates) by early summer.
When i am actually on whatever trip i'm training for, my pack weight is much less, thirty or so pounds with a base weight of twenty lbs...i don't do redundant...i only take what i absolutely need to get me through...lately i have been experimenting with modern lightweight gear...not so that i can include more items, but simply to travel lighter in more comfort!
I scratch my head sometimes when i watch some of these loadout videos...some of these packs would make a mule groan...with some folks it seems to be more about purchasing and  showing off their kit and less about the actual use of that kit....don't get me wrong...iv'e got lots of kit, way too much in fact...but then, most of it sits in a drawer and will never make it into any my loadouts.
I think PW said it best...ad libbing here...something like...take the essentials and then include whatever comfort items you can reasonably carry :P...woods   
« Last Edit: April 26, 2017, 09:28:46 PM by woodsrunner »
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