Author Topic: Calling all chicken pluckers!  (Read 36183 times)

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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #100 on: April 10, 2013, 12:16:24 AM »
Knickknick?



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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #101 on: April 10, 2013, 12:21:38 AM »
Oh no, I know those well as well as most berries around.
I mean these things are small. A big one is the size of a BB, but they are delicious :drool:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #102 on: April 10, 2013, 12:40:50 AM »
Oh no, I know those well as well as most berries around.
I mean these things are small. A big one is the size of a BB, but they are delicious :drool:

I'm at a loss. The only other candidate in my Wild Berries ID book is Mountain Cranberry.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #103 on: April 10, 2013, 12:43:51 AM »
Mountain Cranberry:




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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #104 on: May 05, 2013, 07:33:21 PM »
I thought I'd throw in a few pics here today :)

The wife and I butchered a couple of 'slow growing Cornish Roos' today...

This pic is of our 'resident raven'. He picked up a whole chicken skin and carried it up into this Western Larch to have a little snack. The feathers were flyin' :P...



This is a pic of a couple of Roos and a few of our Golden Laced Wyandotte hens.
The big roo that you see is a Cornish/GLW cross (aka Corndog...Don't ask me, the wife named him :shrug: ) that a hen of ours hatched and raised last summer. The other roo is also a 'homegrown' GLW.
Both of these roos are destined for the pot...



This is 'Cornelius'... He is another roo born and raised here. He's a Russian Orloff and GLW cross.
The wife says that he lives (she thinks he's handsome) :shrug: :) ...



Thanks for looking :)
« Last Edit: May 05, 2013, 08:16:17 PM by Bearhunter »
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #105 on: May 05, 2013, 09:23:09 PM »
Oh how I miss having chickens all over the yard here.     My dogs would shred them all in minutes. :(  Beautiful looking birds you have there.     Do you have problems with preditors at all?
 
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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #106 on: May 05, 2013, 09:41:08 PM »
Oh how I miss having chickens all over the yard here.     My dogs would shred them all in minutes. :(  Beautiful looking birds you have there.     Do you have problems with preditors at all?
 
WW.

'Knock on wood' not really WW!
Hawks have been an issue the past couple of years :pissed:
They really don't seen to be able to get the larger chickens, it's just when we have chicks around that we really have to pay attention.
We use to have a roo that would attack any hawk that came around. He was one tough SOB :D
His name was 'Chicken Lover' :D
This is him, he was one of two of our original Roos and lived to be over 6 years old. He was a mean one, but we kept him around because he took such good care of his hens 8)
He died last fall :( ...



We've had 'bear problems' a few times, but they just seem to eat the chicken feed and leave the birds alone. I guess the feeds much easier to catch :shrug: :P
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #107 on: May 05, 2013, 10:07:46 PM »
Nice lookin' flock, BH. Thanks for sharing. You do seem to have a surplus of roosters, for sure.  ;) Any territorial issues, or is that why some are going in the pot?
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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #108 on: May 05, 2013, 10:20:37 PM »
Nice lookin' flock, BH. Thanks for sharing. You do seem to have a surplus of roosters, for sure.  ;) Any territorial issues, or is that why some are going in the pot?

Thanks OP :)

Oh yeah, they 'fuss and fight' all the time. The dominate roo is one that we've had for almost two years now. He's another GLW. He 'rules the roost'... No one bothers him. He's the one that kicked 'Chicken Lover' down a notch and took over the flock. Poor CL was just too old to keep the roost :(
He sure tried though!
We've always said that he died of loneliness.

That one Cornish/GLW X is loud and obnoxious... That's the main reason he's going!!!
If some certain hens don't quite down... They're getting it too ;)
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #109 on: May 05, 2013, 10:24:52 PM »
Nice lookin' flock, BH. Thanks for sharing. You do seem to have a surplus of roosters, for sure.  ;) Any territorial issues, or is that why some are going in the pot?

Thanks OP :)

Oh yeah, they 'fuss and fight' all the time. The dominate roo is one that we've had for almost two years now. He's another GLW. He 'rules the roost'... No one bothers him. He's the one that kicked 'Chicken Lover' down a notch and took over the flock. Poor CL was just too old to keep the roost :(
He sure tried though!
We've always said that he died of loneliness.

That one Cornish/GLW X is loud and obnoxious... That's the main reason he's going!!!
If some certain hens don't quite down... They're getting it too ;)

Our Australorp monster is just about a year old. He only found his voice a couple months ago, but he's an 8 pound roo with 10 pound lungs!  Fortunately, the neighbors got a roo recently, and ours is teaching him how to crow. Now the neighbors don't know who to be mad at first at 6 am.
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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #110 on: May 05, 2013, 10:28:14 PM »
Nice lookin' flock, BH. Thanks for sharing. You do seem to have a surplus of roosters, for sure.  ;) Any territorial issues, or is that why some are going in the pot?

Thanks OP :)

Oh yeah, they 'fuss and fight' all the time. The dominate roo is one that we've had for almost two years now. He's another GLW. He 'rules the roost'... No one bothers him. He's the one that kicked 'Chicken Lover' down a notch and took over the flock. Poor CL was just too old to keep the roost :(
He sure tried though!
We've always said that he died of loneliness.

That one Cornish/GLW X is loud and obnoxious... That's the main reason he's going!!!
If some certain hens don't quite down... They're getting it too ;)

Our Australorp monster is just about a year old. He only found his voice a couple months ago, but he's an 8 pound roo with 10 pound lungs!  Fortunately, the neighbors got a roo recently, and ours is teaching him how to crow. Now the neighbors don't know who to be mad at first at 6 am.

LOL...
That's prolly the best way to keep peace in the neighborhood.
If ya both have Roos, no one can complain ;)
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #111 on: May 05, 2013, 10:36:45 PM »
"Chicken Lover" has some serious spurs displayed there......no wonder the bears left him alone!  He'd have probably ripped 'em a new one! :duel:
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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #112 on: May 05, 2013, 10:48:33 PM »
"Chicken Lover" has some serious spurs displayed there......no wonder the bears left him alone!  He'd have probably ripped 'em a new one! :duel:

Yeah Wolfy, he sure did have some big ol' spurs 8)
He put a nice hole in my FIL's leg a few years ago :D
In defense of CL, my FIL was messin' with him... The wife and I laughed our a$$es off :lol:
He put a nice hole in my leg once too.
The wife had a 'chicken stick' that she carried around with her if he was nearby.
Like I said, he was mean, but nothing bothered his hens 8)
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #113 on: May 06, 2013, 03:49:31 AM »
At one of our old chicken processing places, the one guy would cut out a cow head shape out of wood.  He'd insert these rooster spurs on each side of the wooden head to look like those Texas Longhorns.  They were pretty cool to look at.   
 
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #114 on: May 22, 2013, 11:42:49 AM »
Finally got a pic of my current flock, and The Boss.



I'm starting to appreciate having a rooster. First of all, his attention to the hens has resulted in increased production.
Secondly, he's better than a watch dog! The other night we had a lone coyote in the neighborhood. The neighbor's rooster, and mine went off at 11:30 pm, crowing nonstop! Took awhile to find the reason. Both roosters were inside their coops, locked up, but they knew something was afoot. My dog slept through the whole thing!  :P

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Offline Trekster

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #115 on: May 23, 2013, 01:52:23 AM »
LOL, my cousin married an 18 year old townie girl who claimed she wanted "soo bad" to be a farmwife, but now that she is one, grandpa takes care of the animals :/


They have chickens. They had a rooster but his wife got sick of the crowing : :rolleyes:


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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #116 on: June 02, 2013, 12:23:11 PM »
The same hen as last year is broody again.
She's got about 18-20 eggs under her (other hens have been laying where she is). We've got to move her to the back.

Like we need more frekin' chickens :crazy:
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 12:45:23 PM by Bearhunter »
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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #117 on: June 02, 2013, 01:14:53 PM »
Finally got a pic of my current flock, and The Boss.



I'm starting to appreciate having a rooster. First of all, his attention to the hens has resulted in increased production.
Secondly, he's better than a watch dog! The other night we had a lone coyote in the neighborhood. The neighbor's rooster, and mine went off at 11:30 pm, crowing nonstop! Took awhile to find the reason. Both roosters were inside their coops, locked up, but they knew something was afoot. My dog slept through the whole thing!  :P

Cool OP :thumbsup:

I just saw this, you posted it up when the wife was gone and I was 'off line'.

Those are some fine looking chickens.
Do ya want some more :P

Our chickens pitch a fit when deer come around, which is all the time... Drives me nuts!
What's funny is that they can tell the difference from a Raven and a hawk when it's flying above and around.
The Ravens hang out here all the time and they could careless, but when a hawk flys over they FREAK out.
I've always found that fascinating.
How do they know ???
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 01:20:42 PM by Bearhunter »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #118 on: June 02, 2013, 01:41:43 PM »
...
What's funny is that they can tell the difference from a Raven and a hawk when it's flying above and around.
The Ravens hang out here all the time and they could careless, but when a hawk flys over they FREAK out.
I've always found that fascinating.
How do they know ???

It's that "6th sense" about the predator "vibes" I've talked about in the hunting threads.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #119 on: June 02, 2013, 09:58:43 PM »
Thats a nice looking flock there, OP.   Handsome feller in the middle of his gals.   I miss having chickens. *sigh*

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Offline Old Philosopher

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Hatching chicks
« Reply #120 on: July 07, 2013, 10:22:49 AM »
We got a rooster to attempt to raise our own chicks for the first time. I've kept chickens steadily now for over 15 years, but never tried hatching them.  Fresh eggs and meat were the main goals. But now we're looking at sustainability of the flock.

We just went through the second 21 day hatching cycle with Zero results. We have one broody hen who it appears would be an ideal 'mother', but apparently spent two 3 week cycles sitting in infertile eggs.

So my question for experienced, successful chick raisers is how do you determine the eggs being incubated are fertile? I'm not looking for textbook answers. I have a whole library and the web to search, but I'm not getting much advice. Eggs need to be at least a week old before they can candled (supposedly), so that seems like a waste to wait a week, candle the eggs, and then throw out any that don't appear fertile.

I have 10 hens that share 3 nesting boxes and 1 rooster. I have no clue about knowing which hens have been bread, and which haven't.  The other issue I'm reading is that incubation is 21 days "FROM THE LAST EGG LAID".  Well, if other hens are laying in the brooding hen's box while she's out on other business, how does that work? Every day she gets a new deposit in her nest from other hens.

Any advice is welcome.
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Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #121 on: July 07, 2013, 11:49:21 AM »
Perhaps your rooster is shooting blanks.  We let one of our broody girls sit on a couple of random eggs last season just to see what would happen.

What happened was just what nature intended.  Now we have an extra chicken and a second rooster, so I consider him a backup. 

As to which hens have been bred, I think if the rooster is doing his job all of them have.  One rooster should be able to handle a dozen chickens.
Upon this a question arises: whether it be better to be loved than feared or feared than loved? One should wish to be both, but, because it is difficult to unite them in one person, it is much safer to be feared than loved.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #122 on: July 07, 2013, 01:46:08 PM »
Perhaps your rooster is shooting blanks.  We let one of our broody girls sit on a couple of random eggs last season just to see what would happen...

Thanks. Problem is, I don't have just a couple random eggs. Our broody girl ends up sitting on a dozen eggs in 2-3 days!  I'm wondering if I should let another clutch of eggs accumulate, and then segregate her so no more are added, and hopefully a few of them will be fertile.  ????
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Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #123 on: July 07, 2013, 01:57:54 PM »
Perhaps your rooster is shooting blanks.  We let one of our broody girls sit on a couple of random eggs last season just to see what would happen...

Thanks. Problem is, I don't have just a couple random eggs. Our broody girl ends up sitting on a dozen eggs in 2-3 days!  I'm wondering if I should let another clutch of eggs accumulate, and then segregate her so no more are added, and hopefully a few of them will be fertile.  ????

You might want to use a magic marker and mark and date the ones she is sitting on to keep track until she is sitting on the amount you want to incubate.

And remember not to count them before they hatch  ;)
Upon this a question arises: whether it be better to be loved than feared or feared than loved? One should wish to be both, but, because it is difficult to unite them in one person, it is much safer to be feared than loved.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #124 on: July 07, 2013, 03:02:49 PM »


You might want to use a magic marker and mark and date the ones she is sitting on to keep track until she is sitting on the amount you want to incubate.


Way ahead of you. That's how I know how many eggs have been added, and which are which.
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Offline Trekster

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #125 on: July 21, 2013, 08:26:37 PM »
Yeah my great grandpa and cousins and uncles always raised chickens but one thing I never figured out is, how can you tell which eggs are fertile and which ones will be eaters? If you leave any egg sit in the cold too long, will it become infertile or an "eater" no matter what?

Nobody ever bothered to explain this to me. LMAO.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #126 on: July 21, 2013, 09:25:05 PM »
Yeah my great grandpa and cousins and uncles always raised chickens but one thing I never figured out is, how can you tell which eggs are fertile and which ones will be eaters? If you leave any egg sit in the cold too long, will it become infertile or an "eater" no matter what?

Nobody ever bothered to explain this to me. LMAO.
PMZ

You don't need a rooster to have eggs. Then you don't have to worry about fertile eggs.

They are ALL "eaters" when they're first laid. Refrigerate them, and even fertile ones don't mature.

They have to sit under a hen for 21 days @ about 108 deg for the embryo to grow into a chick, and hatch.

If you are realy skilled, after about 10 days under a hen you can "candle" the egg, which will show the growing embryo. If there is none, the egg is garbage because by then it's spoiled for eating.

How do you know if the hen is sitting on fertile eggs before that?  You don't.....
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Offline Bearhunter

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Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #127 on: July 25, 2013, 11:03:48 PM »
OP do you remember back in May when I mentioned that our 'broody hen' had gone broody again ???
 None of those hatched because (I'm guessing anyway) she was broody during that cold spell and foot of snow that we got up here and the eggs got too chilled.

Well... She's at it again!
She went broody again while I was gone to 'Bama. The wife says there's 13 eggs under her :doh:
She put her in the back in the old pig/dog house.
We should find out in a couple of weeks if she's going to be successful :shrug:

I guess the wife locked her in the dog house for a few days just to help her along and make sure that she was serious.

She is!!!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #128 on: July 25, 2013, 11:08:39 PM »
Good luck!
After sitting on two failed clutches, my broody one is back to normal. I actually think it had something to do with getting 25 fryer chicks in the nursery! LOL!  She's thinking, like, "What's the point?"

When the fryers are gone, I'll see if she starts sitting again, and segregate her to the nursery where the other hens won't be messing with her nest. I have one hen that seems to be the rooster's favorite, so I'll steal her eggs and put them under the broody one.  Only plan I have at the moment.....
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #129 on: August 13, 2014, 01:03:50 PM »
*BUMPED* for selfish reasons. I'm into my 2014 Chicken Plucking Marathon.

Every time I do this, I learn something. My new motto is: "Never kill more chickens as one time than you can pluck before rigor mortis sets in."  It not only affects the body muscles, but the skin also.  No matter how much you scald the bird, the skin holds the feathers like a vise.

Something else I learned.
Old Timers say that you should hang fowl to "age" like you would beef or pork. Because fowl, especially chickens, are so prone to spoilage, I always tried to get 'em wrapped and in the freezer as soon as possible.

Well...it turns out that waiting to freeze/can the chicken is NOT to let it "age" to become more tender. The reason 'aged' fowl is more tender is because all the effects of rigor mortis have dissipated. If the bird is rushed to the freezer before the body has reached the relaxed post-rigor mortis stage, the meat will be much tougher.  Even cooking during canning won't tenderize the meat.

So...logic follows that any live meat harvested should be allowed to go through the rigor mortis stage before consuming, as it will be more tender. I can hardly wait for the neighbors to ask why I have squirrels hanging on my clothesline overnight. :P   8)
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #130 on: August 13, 2014, 05:04:51 PM »
You go ahead and skin rigid squirrels if you want to......I'll watch! :taunt: :rofl:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #131 on: August 13, 2014, 07:29:28 PM »
You go ahead and skin rigid squirrels if you want to......I'll watch! :taunt: :rofl:
Clean off your glasses, Wolfy. What part of "after rigor mortis dissipates" did you miss? :taunt:
And if you're quick, you can skin 'em before rigor mortis sets in.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #132 on: August 13, 2014, 08:13:14 PM »
Montana squirrels must be more limber, after being dead for 48 hours, than the one that we missed in the back of my buddy's Wagoneer.......stif f as a carp.   We always skin 'em before the body heat dissipates.  They get a LOT harder to skin if you don't.  Are you tellin' ME that I need to attend the Old Philosopher School of Advanced Squirrel Skinning? :rofl:  NO THANKS  :taunt:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #133 on: August 13, 2014, 08:46:01 PM »
... after being dead for 48 hours, than the one that we missed in the back of my buddy's Wagoneer.......stif f as a carp.   ...
LOL!  That wasn't rigor mortis, that was mummification! :lol:

Here's what I was getting at:

Quote
Rigor mortis is very important in meat technology. The onset of rigor mortis and its resolution partially determines the tenderness of meat. If the postslaughter meat is immediately chilled to 15?C (59?F), a phenomenon known as cold shortening occurs, where the muscle sarcomeres shrink to a third of their original length.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigor_mortis
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #134 on: August 13, 2014, 08:54:53 PM »
Yeah, I know what rigor mortis is.  My brother is a professional butcher & meat cutter......remembe r? :P
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #135 on: August 13, 2014, 09:02:34 PM »
I been eating this stuff skinned and hung without a thought.  Now I gotta get a timer and keep track of what time I shot it and what the temperature is and ........... well, crap, I am just gonna keep eating it the way I have been.  All this fancy talk, I swear.
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #136 on: August 13, 2014, 09:04:05 PM »
Old Timers say that you should hang fowl to "age" like you would beef or pork. Because fowl, especially chickens, are so prone to spoilage, I always tried to get 'em wrapped and in the freezer as soon as possible.

Well...it turns out that waiting to freeze/can the chicken is NOT to let it "age" to become more tender. The reason 'aged' fowl is more tender is because all the effects of rigor mortis have dissipated. If the bird is rushed to the freezer before the body has reached the relaxed post-rigor mortis stage, the meat will be much tougher.  Even cooking during canning won't tenderize the meat.

So...logic follows that any live meat harvested should be allowed to go through the rigor mortis stage before consuming, as it will be more tender. I can hardly wait for the neighbors to ask why I have squirrels hanging on my clothesline overnight. :P   8)

The English have long hung game birds like pheasants for a week or so. There is a point where you then gut and pluck the fowl and cook it.  I don't do it, but do hunt with guys who do.  They hunt in England from time to time (or at least they used to) and have this hanging thing down pretty well over here.    Here is a link to some information on hanging birds.  They hang them in a cold environment. 

http://honest-food.net/2012/10/20/on-hanging-pheasants-2/
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 09:14:46 PM by wsdstan »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #137 on: August 13, 2014, 10:05:00 PM »
Interesting link, and comments there, Stan. Thanks.
My Grandfather, being a pheasant hunter, told me stories about how "back in the day" folks would hang their birds by the neck. When they rotted enough that the weight of the body pulled loose from the head, and the bird fell on the floor, they were "ready".  Bleh....! 
He never hung his birds, but he never cleaned them until he got home, which might be 2-4 days. I have no idea what temperatures they might have been exposed to during that time.

I understand the principle behind hanging birds, but I also know that my wife is like 90% of the rest of the population. If I told her I was going to hang the chickens in the root cellar for 4 days before even gutting them, she'd refuse to eat them and tell me they were dog food.

I do question the comment about fish being left un-gutted for any length of time. Flukes and other parasites have ample opportunity to migrate from the intestines/organs into the flesh.

Looking at both sides of the equation, it seems to me that the "tenderizing" has more to do with the effects of rigor mortis than it does with any "fermentation" going on, especially when we're only talking about 72 hrs (3 days in the article).  I know meat that has started to decompose is considered a delicacy in some parts of the World, but I've never been a fan of baluts, either. ;D
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Offline zammer

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #138 on: August 16, 2014, 07:52:37 AM »
Since ya liked my last link soooo much ... >:D  .. I thought I'd share this one as well, why stop at plucking? lets get this duck de-boned as well shall we http://reciperifle.blogspot.ca/2010/11/pate-de-canard-en-croute-part-i.html
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #139 on: August 16, 2014, 10:30:42 AM »
I can't picture myself going through that much effort, hunched over a cutting board & making all those scalpel-like cuts to debone something as diminutive as a duck, but I did enjoy her instructions and style of writing. 

PS......I like your new redwing blackbird avatar!  Reminds me of days spent fishing the sloughs of the Missouri and watching them 'bobbing & trilling' on a cattail stalk. :thumbsup:
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #140 on: August 16, 2014, 10:47:22 AM »
Since ya liked my last link soooo much ... >:D  .. I thought I'd share this one as well, why stop at plucking? lets get this duck de-boned as well shall we http://reciperifle.blogspot.ca/2010/11/pate-de-canard-en-croute-part-i.html
My sons are attending culinary school out on the Coast. When the youngest came home on vacation, he prepared one of our ducks for us. The method in the link is exactly how he did it, removing the ribs and back, and leaving the bones in the wings and legs.
Then he removed the thighs and separated the drumsticks. I can't remember the proper name for the technique, but he then cut around the small end of the drumstick and pushed the meat up to form a ball with a handle. ;)
He was working with a 4.5# duck, and it only took him about 20 minutes.
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #141 on: August 16, 2014, 11:54:23 AM »
I've 'spatchcocked' quite a few chickens for grilling or even for roasting in a shallow Dutch oven, but never have I completely de-boned anything except my deer. :shrug:
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #142 on: August 16, 2014, 03:27:53 PM »
I've 'spatchcocked' quite a few chickens for grilling or even for roasting in a shallow Dutch oven, but never have I completely de-boned anything except my deer. :shrug:
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #143 on: August 16, 2014, 03:44:53 PM »
I always thought that 'turducken' was more of a novelty dish than anything else.  I really can't see why stuffing a bird into a bird, and finally, into a bird would alter the taste of any one of them singly or as a whole, all that much. :shrug:    I'm already running! 8)
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #144 on: August 16, 2014, 03:57:06 PM »
I always thought that 'turducken' was more of a novelty dish than anything else.  I really can't see why stuffing a bird into a bird, and finally, into a bird would alter the taste of any one of them singly or as a whole, all that much. :shrug:    I'm already running! 8)
It IS a novelty, and each retains its own character. All I was saying is that if you're ever inclined to debone and bundle those three birds, bring a lunch...and a bedroll. ;)
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #145 on: August 16, 2014, 04:03:33 PM »
I always thought that 'turducken' was more of a novelty dish than anything else.  I really can't see why stuffing a bird into a bird, and finally, into a bird would alter the taste of any one of them singly or as a whole, all that much. :shrug:    I'm already running! 8)
It IS a novelty, and each retains its own character. All I was saying is that if you're ever inclined to debone and bundle those three birds, bring a lunch...and a bedroll. ;)
That's exactly why I'm still running! :rofl:
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Online wsdstan

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #146 on: August 16, 2014, 04:17:19 PM »
I don't believe in eating stuff that sound like it came out of somethings rear end.  :P
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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #147 on: August 20, 2014, 07:56:09 PM »
Well....someone, somewhere brought up the economics of raising your own backyard chickens.  I've never given it much thought, because I like the idea of knowing every where my food's been growing up, and how it was handled in processing.

But being naturally curious (and bored to death), I ran the numbers. Since I don't consider my time worth any $$$ these days, I only crunched the hard figures.

25 CornishX meat birds = $25 + 250lbs feed = $110. 
25 birds raised to 11 wks = 90 pounds cut n' wrapped.
Store price on a good day for whole fryers = $1.98/lb x 90 lbs = $178.20
Net savings from our 25 home raised chicken =  $68.20.

Was 3 months of daily hauling water and feed, and swamping out their rearing pen 3 times worth $68?  My jury's still out on that one.  But I do know they taste a whole lot better than ones that have been transported 500 miles, half frozen and thawed, and handled by who knows whom?

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #148 on: August 23, 2014, 03:27:20 PM »
Good lookin chicken stock.  I'm in the process of rebuilding my chicken run.  The raccoons had a good year and ate well at my place. I'm down to three birds. 

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Re: Calling all chicken pluckers!
« Reply #149 on: August 23, 2014, 03:30:40 PM »
I've run the numbers on raising chickens.  Best I can figure, there is no money to be made.  Between the feed, the expense of building a predator proof pen, and replacing what gets killed by predators and the neighbor's dog, I've lost more money than I care to think about.  But I raise them for fun and not for profit anyway.