Author Topic: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'  (Read 410 times)

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Offline Mannlicher

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BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« on: November 23, 2017, 05:40:10 AM »
Has anyone ever really used a pre packed emergency kit to actually survive in a time of adversity?  I carry a BOB all the time in the 4Runner.  I have a PSK packed in my hunting/ hiking day pack.  Other than to use some of the gear to fix lunch, I have never, ever, had to rely on my survival gear or skills to 'survive'.  I read all the time about folks that find themselves in dire straights,  and they don't have a clue.  Or a pack.  Some live, some don't.  Either due to luck, divine providence or preps in advance, I have never 'been there'.

Offline hayshaker

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2017, 06:09:17 AM »
thanks mannlicter for bringing this up.
as for me i have never used a pre packaged kit.
i've always bought a bag and put what i felt was nessasary
to my needs.in the van i have a ghb and a hospital stay bag,
as well as a bloout trauma kit a gsw kit if you will,
noone can make a onesize fits all bag. simply put everyone is different.
then there are skill levels that come into play as well.

the survival blankets i carry are the real ones not the 2'99cent walmart ones,
as well as army wool blankets, some lg;fur pelts for neck wraps
a pony blanket, and no i did not skin the pony myself.
boo coup water a must, a mini propane stove, and heater. 1,lb tanks
snoshoes, jumper cables, LURP rations, cookware, ,tarps, tow ropes and chains.
extra thermals, gloves,hats,bowsaw,hayshaker custom knives.,ect,ect
not everything fits in a bob,LOL any how this is aa typical winter ;loadout
on the western paririe.
                               
                                 

Offline madmax

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2017, 06:19:42 AM »
  Well you know these 2 stories
 
 On one of our Pot and Machete's the temperature went way below what the forecast was.  Greyhound had to be evac'd with a bad cut  Out came the 1st aid kit.  He eventually needed surgery.  The ER staff complimented the 1st aid.  Most everybody opened their E bags  when the shivering started.  And for those that might sneer at our FL "thin blood",  a member flew in from Chicago to do this and wound up wrapped up like a honey baked ham in his emergency blanket.  Still shivered all night.

  One time I really screwed the pooch was when Max went after a monkey off my SUP about dark.  Flipped, drifted into a strainer, about dark.  I was in a hurry packing leaving camp and my bags were not secured well.  Plus I had to cut loose the remaining bags to get the board upright.  It was dark dark dark in the swamp with high water.  I couldn't find dry ground.  I gave up and used Max to at least keep one side warm.  Shivered all night.  He saved me from much worse hypothermia.  I would have been a lot more comfortable with  my E bag.

   There is the  grizzly bear story when he charged me in a class IV rapid into a huge hydraulic.  Boat ended up pinned in a log jam.  I held onto my paddle and snatched my E bag as I exited.  I was able to get to a highway (7 or 8 hours) in daylight  (it was Alaska)  so I didn't need my bag.  There's a lot more to that story.  But I save that for the campfire.

    I don't want to ever have to use an E bag again.

   
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2017, 01:22:45 PM »
Living on the farm and in the part of the country we are in I have never contemplated leaving here to go somewhere else.  I have stuff stored in the house that is what we would use should a SHTF event occur but I doubt we would consider leaving here on a moments notice.

Hope I am right.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2017, 01:34:53 PM »
I do too, because we are in the same boat here in my section of Nebraska.  We are always prepared for the S hitting the F because about every few years or so, it seems to. :shrug:
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2017, 04:19:28 PM »
So far the worst I've seen here in my part of UT in ten years is a 12 hour long power outage. I keep waiting for a really bad snowstorm where we have to dig out but it hasn't happened yet. Nevertheless, I like to keep the oil lanterns handy along with the solar chargers.

As for using an emergency survival kit, I haven't had to. I keep very basic stuff with me when in walking distance of the house or car. It's not really possible to get truly lost in the valley where i live since you can easily figure out which way to go to find a road by just looking at the mountains. And having easily visible prominent landmarks like that makes it really easy to pin your position down on a map with a base plate compass (though in spite of carrying one, I've never needed it out here).

In places like Florida where there isn't any "high ground" and you are surrounded by trees blocking your line of sight to any landmarks, navigation is much more critical. I grew up in Louisiana and most of the gulf coast states are like this. Dense foliage makes navigation really hard if you don't know exactly where you are and how to get where you need to be.




Offline Unknown

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2017, 06:29:19 PM »
Pre-packed is not the same as prepackaged
 
I had to get into my bag to find a needle when my others went missing. Clothing repaired. Needle returned.
 Also have had to retrieve a band aid when all the other finger B-A were used up. Restocked at store.

Offline wolfy

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2017, 06:42:40 PM »
Which brings up another experience that I have encountered.....OLD supplies.  Old aspirin tablets, antibacterial ointments, adhesive tapes, etc. won't keep forever and deteriorate with time.  Best keep an eye on them and restock at least once per year, especially when storage conditions are not ideal.
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Offline hayshaker

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2017, 07:19:57 PM »
when carring a bag in the vehicle be it a bob,ghb or psk,
given extreme tempiture fluctuations, meds,otc's and
food of any kind should be either disposed of or if somehow
still good should be used up.
spring and fall are good times to due this.
dollar store can replace many items it kit.
using one's wallet is a good place to keep a few band-aids
sewing needle and thread or sniew an a telfa pad.

Offline hunter63

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2017, 08:35:26 PM »
Which brings up another experience that I have encountered.....OLD supplies.  Old aspirin tablets, antibacterial ointments, adhesive tapes, etc. won't keep forever and deteriorate with time.  Best keep an eye on them and restock at least once per year, especially when storage conditions are not ideal.

That is a concern...keeping in vehicle is worst...hot cold damp....

Used to use my PSK a lot back in my younger years (didn't know what it was called back then)...aspirin and tums for a case of saloon flu...bandages to patch up cut when dress in deer, and matches/lighter wax fire starter, for fire to dry out clothes.
Compass to find the truck that someone moved,....alum foil to make a quick cup.....

Lately no....but I always carry, my "bag" even when I'm gonna sit in my elevated stand....

That was the latest use......Had to use my carried matches to light up the propane stove after the mice ate the stashed matches.
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Offline buzzacott

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2017, 06:23:58 AM »
Every year I conduct a "waterbottle and knife" 2-nighter where, as the title suggests, you need canteen and a knife. The other items required are a mylar space blanket, a small emergency ration of hard candy and soup mix or bullion cubes, some clear plastic transpiration bags (70 litre/19 gallon) and a pocket survival kit.

I recommend participants grab a Bob Cooper Survival Kit, but I have done it in years past with a SOL Pocket Survival Pak and a cheapie BCB Combat Survival tin respectively.

The idea is to see what works and what doesn't by living out of a PSK for three days and two nights with not much else in the way of equipment or provisions while walking 15 or so km over the course of the weekend. It's been a great confidence booster for many of the participants, most of whom are hikers/backpackers used to lugging around a 60lb pack for the same amount of time.

I have never been forced to rely upon a PSK in a real life emergency and hope I never have to.
Don't kill unless for the pot. Don't fell a green tree for a pole if there are dry poles nearby. Study the bush, learn to read its secrets; watch the mason fly building and go to the ant for another lesson... then you'll realise the bush is your friend.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2017, 10:20:38 AM »
  Seems we've had this discussion about emergency survival kits several times here in the past,  the last only having been a short while back when I started a thread about looking for a lighter weight first aid kit while at a Cabela's store.
  I remarked about noticing the volume of "Survival" kits that were being offered in the same aisle as the first aid kits, it was really the first time I had noticed them,  in my opinion commercially packaged first aid kits for the most part are well thought out and well stocked IF you know what you're looking for and pay attention to the list of included items, kits are assembled according to the type of outings you involve yourself with,  whether it's sports, camping/hiking, or water sports/boating, and of course they can be used as a basic kit and added to according to ones needs.
  Most Personal Survival kits however I think are designed to take your money and leave you with a false sense of security and very little that will make ones ability to survive a real emergency survival event,  unless the person is well trained and practiced in the art of survival and self reliance skills, and even then the contents of most of the pre packaged kits on the market are of marginal quality and usability.
  I've had the experience of testing several survival kits over the last couple years and frankly I can't think of a situation whether in the woods or in suburbia where I needed to sustain my well being by counting on the contents of these small "survival Kits",  the contents of these kits on average contain pretty much the same items,  for example, a couple of band aids is not a solution to most medical emergencies,  a razor blade is not a useable knife, chances are the enclosed wire saw will break with the first use, a few wooden matches are not a sure fire starter, a few large fish hooks and a couple of sinkers won't get you a fish dinner in a stream or small pond, especially without some sort of fishing line,  a survival tin can be used to boil water to purify it, but most will only hold two ~ three ounces of water,  evaporation while boiling and perhaps a little spillage in the handling and you aren't left with much to hydrate with properly.
  It's said you can survive three days without water and three weeks without food,  maybe so, but after a couple of days without food the body begins to slow down while it starts to feed off it's reserves, decision making becomes harder and thinking becomes blurred, usually there's very little in those kits that are going to help you to find water or food.
  Shelter is an important issue even in a short term survival situation, you may be lucky enough to find that your kit contains a thin silver colored small survival blanket, but you'll soon recognize just how small and fragile is is when you try to unfold it, if you are very gentle with it, and it's not too windy, you may get a couple of days use out of it before it falls apart,  wrapping up in it won't help you form freezing, but if you can build a small shelter and get a decent fire going,  the blanket placed on the inside back of the shelter and used as a reflector might help to keep you alive.
  My best advice, don't buy one, make your own, if you do decide to buy a pre packaged PSK, buy two or more, keep one for your emergency, and use the other/s for practice until you get to know the contents and just how far they will go to help you out of your bind,  opening up any kit, good or otherwise, for the first time when you find yourself in a real emergency is not going to be your best course of action.         
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Offline hunter63

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2017, 12:52:24 PM »
I guess I view my "kits' differently.
They are Not "Pack it, forget it and hope it helps... JIC'

Between my pockets and kits...I am using some of the stuff on a real regular basis.
Thermos, water, snacks, fire aid stuff, meds.....fire stuff......
Some do got a year between seasons , but most are used on outings.
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline Icepick15

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2017, 02:13:47 PM »
I used to hunt...a lot, and usually alone.  I have never got myself into a real "survival" situation....knock on wood.  I left the trail one time on a dismal, overcast day, in unfamiliar territory, and didn't take a bearing when I walked off.  Yeah, I know.  Thick woods, flat, lots of underbrush, no landmarks to identify on my map.  After a while, I thought I was lost, but I was only confused for a couple of hours.  I used my compass a lot more from then on.

Guys I used to hunt with used to kid me about the day pack I always carried.  "You going on safari?"  Then, some time later, I'd hear "Do you happen to have a band-aid in that pack?"  Or, "I have a loose screw on my scope mount."  I never understood those guys.  Some of them went off into the woods carrying only some kind of knife, a gun, and 6 or 8 rounds of ammo.  No canteen, no compass, no cordage, nuttin'.

A time or two, I have rolled up on a wreck on the highway, and put road flares to good use.

One afternoon years ago (before cell phones), I was hunting, and I was very thankful for the military surplus E-Tool in the back of my Bronco II.  I was stuck.  Not deep.  But I was stuck.  Might have had to spend the night in the woods that time.  No, I wouldn't have died, but it would have been inconvenient.  Thinking back on that one, I wonder if my then wife would have been really mad when I didn't show up, or if she would have sent out a search party.  Probably the search party.  Actually, probably both.  She wouldn't have wanted me to die in the woods without having had a chance to bi**h me out.

I have a smallish first aid kit in my vehicle bag.  Not a commercial one...I put it together myself.  My current iteration is in one of the Maxpedition waist packs.  I have had occasion to use some stuff in it several times for minor cuts, scrapes, headaches, etc., in the woods or otherwise.  More often than not for someone else.  I agree that most of the commercial "survival" kits or first aid kits I have seen on the market are sorely lacking as they are.  Some of them can give you a base from which to start; and others are just gimmicks.

Well, this turned out to be longer than anticipated.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2017, 03:01:23 PM »
I really like this place for the kinds of supplies we've been talking about in this thread.  I am continually amazed at the new products and vast selection they offer at reasonable prices.....

https://www.minimus.biz/
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Offline hunter63

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2017, 03:48:23 PM »
I used to hunt...a lot, and usually alone.  I have never got myself into a real "survival" situation....knock on wood.  I left the trail one time on a dismal, overcast day, in unfamiliar territory, and didn't take a bearing when I walked off.  Yeah, I know.  Thick woods, flat, lots of underbrush, no landmarks to identify on my map.  After a while, I thought I was lost, but I was only confused for a couple of hours.  I used my compass a lot more from then on.

Guys I used to hunt with used to kid me about the day pack I always carried.  "You going on safari?"  Then, some time later, I'd hear "Do you happen to have a band-aid in that pack?"  Or, "I have a loose screw on my scope mount."  I never understood those guys.  Some of them went off into the woods carrying only some kind of knife, a gun, and 6 or 8 rounds of ammo.  No canteen, no compass, no cordage, nuttin'.

A time or two, I have rolled up on a wreck on the highway, and put road flares to good use.

One afternoon years ago (before cell phones), I was hunting, and I was very thankful for the military surplus E-Tool in the back of my Bronco II.  I was stuck.  Not deep.  But I was stuck.  Might have had to spend the night in the woods that time.  No, I wouldn't have died, but it would have been inconvenient.  Thinking back on that one, I wonder if my then wife would have been really mad when I didn't show up, or if she would have sent out a search party.  Probably the search party.  Actually, probably both.  She wouldn't have wanted me to die in the woods without having had a chance to bi**h me out.

I have a smallish first aid kit in my vehicle bag.  Not a commercial one...I put it together myself.  My current iteration is in one of the Maxpedition waist packs.  I have had occasion to use some stuff in it several times for minor cuts, scrapes, headaches, etc., in the woods or otherwise.  More often than not for someone else.  I agree that most of the commercial "survival" kits or first aid kits I have seen on the market are sorely lacking as they are.  Some of them can give you a base from which to start; and others are just gimmicks.

Well, this turned out to be longer than anticipated.

I had to kind laugh with you on this......I have been that way all my life....
....and had the occasional hunting partners "need" some thing that I can generally can help out with.....But only once'

Duck hunted with a guy... that had a "friend"...(you can see where this is going already).
The "Friend" had inherited  some money and bragged all the time about it......
One day the guy had to leave the blind (did this a lot)...so I was stuck with the "friend"

Duck were flying and we were shooting...and the "Friend" says..."Hey lend me some shells...I'll pay you back"
So I did....

Following week...same thing...So when the "Hey, lend me some shells" came....I just said.. "No..."
So it was "What do you mean ..No...I'm out?"
Told him..."You ran out least week and been bragging about your new cabin, $1000 buck dog, $2000 shotgun...I would have guessed a big shot like you,? would have bought some..... Maybe sell something, so you can afford you own shells?

He got really pizzed off.....left and he never showed up while was I there..........Neve r paid me back for the 20 shells I had lent him the first time.

See him once in awhile at our DU dinners....and is still cheap SOB.....

Like I said ...Only once"
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Offline OffGrid9

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2017, 04:27:35 PM »
...takes me back.  In 1956, after an embarrassing overnight solo camping trip where I had nothing that would help me join a couple of shelter-halves, Dad wouldn't let me camp or hike alone (or with a friend my age) without an emergency kit.  We made it up together.  Before every trip I had to unpack it, renew some stuff (water, batteries, etc), and roll it back up.  It was pretty comprehensive.  To the best of my recollection, these were the contents:
  • 2 surplus WWII lightweight nylon ponchos
  • 1 surplus WWII 2-qt plastic-bladder canteen
  • UNOPENED bottle of halazone tablets (only good for a few days after opened)
  • 1 can of corned beef hash (and a P-38 John Wayne)
  • 50-ft surplus WWII paracord
  • 100-ft spool of braided nylon string
  • tiny sewing kit - large needles, heavy thread, buttons, safety pins
  • small 1st aid kit - insect repellent, iodine, various bandages, couple patches of moleskin, aspirin
  • Cutter snake-bite kit
  • 20 wax-dipped strike-anywhere kitchen matches (cut to fit into a 35mm film can)
  • 3 vaseline-soaked cotton balls (in another film can)
  • small flashlight
  • small 2-blade folding knife
  • small (but decent quality) compass
  • old, used police whistle
  • extra set of underwear (no $hit)
It weighed about 6 pounds -- the water and hash were 5 pounds, everything else was light.  You can likely tell, Dad and I spent a lot of time browsing through military surplus stores.  Gooood memories.  And it was a good kit.  It was all rolled up in one of the ponchos.  I also carried my usual gear, including a knife, flashlight, compass, canteen, rope, cordage, and matches -- the duplicate items in the kit were in case I forgot something, or got in a bind.  ...And yeah, the underwear was Mom's idea, but it did come in handy...won't go into that one. :-[

And yes, I did use stuff from that kit, many times...bug repellent, moleskin, and other stuff from the 1st aid kit, a poncho, a cotton ball (saved my bacon on a couple of rainy trips...I was no expert fire-starter), and (once) the underwear.  But Dad drummed it into me that the food and water in this kit was ONLY FOR EMERGENCIES.

However, one time I decided to extend a camping trip, and ate the hash.  Dad was ticked, made me replace it with canned dog food.  He'd read about that somewhere -- strange, but it seems most folks just won't eat it unless they REALLY have to.  Don't get me wrong, it was GOOD, nutritious dog food.  I never tried it.

Carrying that kit was a good habit -- I still carry one like it, especially when I hunt or hike or camp alone.  It's pretty similar to my first one.  Two-liter plastic bottle instead of the old "jungle canteen", better medical supplies, a mylar sleeping bag.  But the only dog food is for my dog.  I went back to hash for me.
From 30 feet away she looked like a lot of class. From 10 feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from 30 feet away.  ― Raymond Chandler, from The High Window   [ LSHISM ]

Offline hunter63

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2017, 06:36:25 PM »
Wow, You were a lucky guy.......we didn't have that much stuff...LOL.....
Actually MF was a forest ranger...only got off work on rainy days in the summer...so I didn't camp with him much.
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Offline Mannlicher

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2017, 05:44:22 AM »
Which brings up another experience that I have encountered.....OLD supplies.  Old aspirin tablets, antibacterial ointments, adhesive tapes, etc. won't keep forever and deteriorate with time.  Best keep an eye on them and restock at least once per year, especially when storage conditions are not ideal.
a good point Wolfy.  I go through all my gear,  BOB, PSK and the like, the first of September every year.  Everything comes out,  lots gets replaced and up dated.  I do that because I needed some batteries on a solo over night, and all stash were dead.
 

Offline Yeoman

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2017, 06:41:38 AM »
I've never had to use any of my survival kits' contents to keep me alive.
I have used some contents for repair, replacement or convenience but that's it.
The OP notes that he carries a kit and has never needed it and that some people get into trouble and don't have a kit nor a clue.
I think that having a kit is not a part of proper preparation but rather is an indication of proper preparation.
Most people get into trouble because they are ignorant of the skills and knowledge they should have for an activity.
If someone prepares properly for an outdoor activity, then they'll often have the know-how to get along without a kit or have the kit they need to offset their skill/knowledge deficiency.
In my example, my kits are heavy on shelter/fire because I have first hand experience building natural shelters (lots of time and effort) and I can't light a fire without gear.
Les Stroud wrote the intro to Dr. Andr?-Francois Bourbeau's book ?Wilderness Secrets Revealed, Adventures of a Survivor.? In the intro, Les comments that people like himself, Bourbeau and other experts fantasize about putting their skills to the real test, but because of their training and knowledge, it's likely to never happen.   

The first kit I carried was a kit I made based on the old Canadian Cub Scout Book. Sucrets tin with tin foil, string, wire, paper, pencil stub, 2 quarters, matches, needle and thread, fish hooks, line and weights, card with name, address and phone number. The only time I ever used it was on a fishing trip with my dad. He was driving an old Chevy Nova at the time and we came down hard on a rock on the logging road. Shortly after, the car died. Turned out we crushed the fuel line. A guy was coming out of the woods in a pickup and stopped to see if we needed help. He very generously cut off a few inches of his outboard motor gas hose, and he and Dad used a tire iron to jimmy off the clamp of the fuel line. They spliced the fuel line with the hose and they used the snare wire from my kit to cinch both ends of the hose tight to the fuel line. Dad then poured some fuel right into the carb and had me turn the motor over. Starting the car was a pretty big deal for me at 11 or 12.

I got my first commercial survival kit as part of a Christmas present from my Dad's fishing and hunting buddy. He gave me a small back pack with a rubber ground sheet, rope, compass, aluminum mess kit, food (cheese tube, sardines, crackers, water purification tablets), a canteen, and the survival kit. It came from Canadian tire and IIRC it was a heavy duty 1 quart zip lock type bag with tube tent, nylon line, matches, fire starter, tin foil, razor blade, fish hooks, line, sinkers, snare wire, water purification tablets and a needle. I'm not sure if that's all, but I can look back and remember that it's one of very few store bought kits I've seen that actually covers shelter/fire/water in any meaningful way. The only thing I used from this kit was the tube tent. It was a large heavy grade yellow plastic and I used it as a pack cover when I did my 10km solo hike for my Chief Scout Award. Man it poured the first night.

More recently, I've been carrying an augmented SOL Scout Survival Kit http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/survive-outdoors-longer-scout.html
It now contains: 2x2 gauze pad, small military pressure bandage, 2x3 adhesive gauze bandaid, SOL Heat Sheet, 10m para cord, SOL Sparker and fire starters, Victorinox Hiker (scales removed), quality wire saw with swivels, 12 chlorine dioxide water purification tablets, 2 small freezer bags, heavy duty tin foil, Suunto Clipper Compass, SOL Howler whistle, Photon LED light.
To me, this is the smallest kit possible that adequately covers the essentials. I carry it on a belt loop EVERY time I'm out in the woods, canoeing, camping, fishing whatever. I'm sometimes embarrassed to carry it at a campground or day hike in a municipal park or trail, but I store it in the glove compartment of the car and would feel pretty dumb to need it and know I intentionally left it behind.
I used this kit for about 30 hours in training so I have confidence that'll it will work for a minimum of 72 hours if I got lost. The only things from the kit I've needed to use were the gauze pad and bandage for a cut finger and another time, the knife. Once, when fishing when (I can't believe I'm going to admit this) I forgot my fixed blade in the car and didn't have a pocket knife on me (still can't figure out how that happened).

I have a Mors Kochanski style pot kit that I keep in the trunk of the car. Coffee pot with mylar tube tent and clear plastic drop cloth, para cord and mule tape, Mini Bic and spark stick, PJ cotton pads, button compass, whistle, Opinel #8, mirror. I use this kit a lot for training and will often take it on a day trip in the canoe so I don't need to pack a bag. The only thing I've used from this kit was a PJ cotton pad fire starter. Last Thur the Cub Scouts had invested the new Cubs and held their meeting at a local camp. While the ceremony was going on I set up the fire pit. It had rained for the last two days and so I used the firestarter to save time and effort.

My car kit is my area I need to improve most. Besides the pot kit in the trunk I've got the normal spare tire, jack and tire iron. I also have a small selection of screwdrivers, pliers and wrenches plus an e-tool, hatchet and 12" bowsaw. In the winter I add a collapsible snow shovel and bag a salt. I throw in a winter sleeping bag if I'm travelling any distance on the highways. They only part of my car kit I've needed to use is the spare tire. Anything else I've used was not important enough to remember.

Nuts, another long-winded boring post.
Sorry all,
Yeo   

"Learning is an interruption of the failure process"
- Me, 2014

Offline Yeoman

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2017, 06:44:18 AM »
Which brings up another experience that I have encountered.....OLD supplies.  Old aspirin tablets, antibacterial ointments, adhesive tapes, etc. won't keep forever and deteriorate with time.  Best keep an eye on them and restock at least once per year, especially when storage conditions are not ideal.
a good point Wolfy.  I go through all my gear,  BOB, PSK and the like, the first of September every year.  Everything comes out,  lots gets replaced and up dated.  I do that because I needed some batteries on a solo over night, and all stash were dead.
Fire departments remind people to change their smoke alarm batteries in the fall and spring when we change to/from Daylight Savings Time.
I adopted this advice to review the contents of kits; especially fire making devices and expiry dates on water purification tablets.
"Learning is an interruption of the failure process"
- Me, 2014

Offline hunter63

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #21 on: November 26, 2017, 08:21:58 AM »
Which brings up another experience that I have encountered.....OLD supplies.  Old aspirin tablets, antibacterial ointments, adhesive tapes, etc. won't keep forever and deteriorate with time.  Best keep an eye on them and restock at least once per year, especially when storage conditions are not ideal.
a good point Wolfy.  I go through all my gear,  BOB, PSK and the like, the first of September every year.  Everything comes out,  lots gets replaced and up dated.  I do that because I needed some batteries on a solo over night, and all stash were dead.
Fire departments remind people to change their smoke alarm batteries in the fall and spring when we change to/from Daylight Savings Time.
I adopted this advice to review the contents of kits; especially fire making devices and expiry dates on water purification tablets.

I was going to bring this up....Thanks.
Good time to change you clocks, check smoke/CO alarms.....also fire extinguishers...... add all flashlights ...(or most of them)
Change vehicle  carry from summer verchual carry to winter carry.
This includes carried meds......
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline Phaedrus

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Re: BOBs, PSK, and other assorted 'survival preps'
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2017, 07:59:43 PM »
  Most Personal Survival kits however I think are designed to take your money and leave you with a false sense of security and very little that will make ones ability to survive a real emergency survival event,  unless the person is well trained and practiced in the art of survival and self reliance skills, and even then the contents of most of the pre packaged kits on the market are of marginal quality and usability.
  I've had the experience of testing several survival kits over the last couple years and frankly I can't think of a situation whether in the woods or in suburbia where I needed to sustain my well being by counting on the contents of these small "survival Kits",  the contents of these kits on average contain pretty much the same items,  for example, a couple of band aids is not a solution to most medical emergencies,  a razor blade is not a useable knife, chances are the enclosed wire saw will break with the first use, a few wooden matches are not a sure fire starter, a few large fish hooks and a couple of sinkers won't get you a fish dinner in a stream or small pond, especially without some sort of fishing line,  a survival tin can be used to boil water to purify it, but most will only hold two ~ three ounces of water,  evaporation while boiling and perhaps a little spillage in the handling and you aren't left with much to hydrate with properly.
  It's said you can survive three days without water and three weeks without food,  maybe so, but after a couple of days without food the body begins to slow down while it starts to feed off it's reserves, decision making becomes harder and thinking becomes blurred, usually there's very little in those kits that are going to help you to find water or food.
  Shelter is an important issue even in a short term survival situation, you may be lucky enough to find that your kit contains a thin silver colored small survival blanket, but you'll soon recognize just how small and fragile is is when you try to unfold it, if you are very gentle with it, and it's not too windy, you may get a couple of days use out of it before it falls apart,  wrapping up in it won't help you form freezing, but if you can build a small shelter and get a decent fire going,  the blanket placed on the inside back of the shelter and used as a reflector might help to keep you alive.
  My best advice, don't buy one, make your own, if you do decide to buy a pre packaged PSK, buy two or more, keep one for your emergency, and use the other/s for practice until you get to know the contents and just how far they will go to help you out of your bind,  opening up any kit, good or otherwise, for the first time when you find yourself in a real emergency is not going to be your best course of action.       

That's pretty much my thinking as well.  I have a metric buttload of 'survival gear' and love to play with it.  Most of the pre-packaged kits leave a lot to be desired. Yet, I think some of them work great as a base to build one.  For example, another poster posted a link to the SOL Scout kit- I think that's a terrific kit for the money.  I have four of them, all purchased from Amazon for around $12.50 each with free shipping! Seriously, you can't buy the components separately for that price.  The kit comes in a decent dry sack that has enough room to add some more items.  I have one that I stash in a side pocket of my water bottle carrier.  I added a Ritter CRKT RSK-Mk 5, some more tinder, a proper light, chlorine dioxide tablets, a Suunto compass, a tube with some high quality sailmaker's needles and safety pins, etc.  The pocket on the front holds a good light, a Sawyer filter, a real knife, a cyalume stick, a couple ponchos and another space blanket, some cordage, etc.

An excellent point- you have to use the gear you carry.  I expect a lot of folks that buy premade kits kind of pat themselves on the pack for being so wise and prepared, then simply toss the kit in their packs and never open them.  Carrying untested gear isn't wise, and even worse taking gear you don't even know how to use!