Author Topic: Trail foods and camp cooking  (Read 51542 times)

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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #100 on: March 08, 2013, 01:00:48 PM »
    I did a search for "pressure cooker" in the search here at B&B. But, none of the posts talked about using one out in the field. I saw one being packed in the video/film that OutdoorEnvy posted in this topic here: Winter Camping: "Sub-Artic Winter Bivouacking"

   But, we never packed or used one, back when I was in doing CWT, & since no one seems to have mentioned using one out in the woods/bush, I thought I would ask here in this topic, about "Trail foods & Camp Cooking", started by Moe, rather than start a new topic.


Anyone ever used a pressure cooker when out in the woods/bush?

  I've never used a pressure cooker in a camp setting,  I have seen pressure cookers made for camping advertised,  but no reviews.

  However,  while watching Dave Canterbury's series ' The journal of the yurt' he mentioned in passing when reviewing some of his pack gear,  that he's used his MSR Seagull pot as a pressure cooker.
  I do have and use a more modern electric pressure cooker at home so I was a bit intrigued by the thought of using a common covered pot as a make shift pressure cooker.
  As OP mentioned in one of his posts above,  pressure cookers depend on a tight seal that holds the steam created in the pot to do the actual cooking,  BUT, a pressure cooker also has a pressure relief valve to insure that the pot doesn't blow up when too much pressure built up.
  I have the same MSR Seagull pot that he was referring to,  in looking it over and doing a little testing I found that the pot lid fits pretty tightly,  it has no seal or gasket
that would cause a real seal,  but it does have a handle that folds over the top of the lid, the handle is notched and fits over a raised lid lifter protrusion on the lid which kind of acts to keep the handle centered on the lid,  the end of the handle is held tightly in place by a hook and toggle type lock.
  I filled the pot half full of water,  put the lid on the pot and latched it closed,  then I turned the pot over and was surprised to find that I had very little leakage of water from the lid,  next I put the pot over my small single burner Coleman propane stove and brought it to a boil,  what I got was a minimal amount of steam escaping from the pot during the boil time,  I'm assuming that the little steady escape of steam would prevent any danger of the pot blowing up and causing any injury,  it just wouldn't be as efficient as a real pressure cooker.
  A pressure cooker is designed to raise the temp of the cooking liquid past the 212 degrees at which water turns to steam to about 240 degrees or so I believe,  and the pressure relief valves are most likely designed to achieve the proper temp while eliminating the danger of too high a pressure.
  That done,  I emptied the pot and put in about one cup of water,  a cup full of stew meat (beef) and a cup full of chopped celery, carrots, and onion, and 1/2 a diced medium potato, some salt, pepper, and 1/2 a teaspoon of granulated beef bullion,  I brought the water to a boil, reduced the heat and placed the cover on loosely,  and let it simmer for about one hour.
  At the end of the hour I took the pot off the heat and checked my stew,  it was cooked,  the veggies were tender and the meat was cooked through but still a bit chewy, which is typical for cheap cuts of meat that need longer braising times,  over all it was very good.
  Next,  I assembled the same ingredients in the pot,  then brought it to a boil as in the previous test,  but this time I took the pot off the heat and lowered the flame to where it was in the simmering process,  I placed the cover on the pot and this time I latched the handle down over the lid causing a pressure fit to the pot and cover,  then I put it back on the stove and timed it for one hour as in the previous batch.
  After the hour was up I shut the burner off and continued to get steam escaping from the pot for about 40 seconds after the burner was Shut off telling me that I did have some trapped pressure left in the pot,  the end result was that everything in the pot was a bit more tender and the meat was no longer chewy,  the flavor of the broth seems to be more intense than the first batch was.
  So my thinking is that while the little Seagull pot didn't equal a pressure cooker,  it was a definite improvement over just a pot and loose fitting lid.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2013, 01:24:15 PM by Moe M. »
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #101 on: March 08, 2013, 06:27:08 PM »
Old P. The one I have is steel. I think it is a "Regal". I will check & reply when I do.
I "Know",  it is not aluminum.

I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #102 on: March 08, 2013, 06:31:41 PM »
Moe, I was talking about a "rocker"or a "gauge" style pressure cooker,not a "lets trythis/halfazzed", type cooker. I appreciate your last post. But it is not what I was asking about.
 :D


Although I have that same type pot. I may have to try that method sometime.
Maybe with some rice...
;)
« Last Edit: March 09, 2013, 02:43:45 AM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #103 on: March 08, 2013, 09:33:55 PM »
Old P. The one I have is steel. I think it is a "Regal". I will check & reply when I do.
I "Know",  it is not aluminum.
I cook with heavy gauge aluminum all the time, so that doesn't bother me. My concern was that the rubber gasket in a pressure cooker and the flames from a cook fire might not play well together.  A person would just have to be careful, that's all.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #104 on: March 09, 2013, 02:40:01 AM »
This one is a "Presto", not a Regal. it is small, (4 qt. I think) compared to our other one we use for canning. I think that larger one is aluminum though. It is stored away at the moment.


I agree Old P. The seal & handles would be my greatest concern. I think "stovetop" might be a better way to use them out in the sticks. I'm not going to ruin mine to find out what open fire/coals would do...
;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #105 on: March 09, 2013, 09:02:00 AM »
This one is a "Presto", not a Regal. it is small, (4 qt. I think) compared to our other one we use for canning. I think that larger one is aluminum though. It is stored away at the moment.


I agree Old P. The seal & handles would be my greatest concern. I think "stovetop" might be a better way to use them out in the sticks. I'm not going to ruin mine to find out what open fire/coals would do...
 ;)

LOL! Yeah, I forgot all about plastic handles! That's enough reason to keep it out of the coals!

My cooker is a Mantra. It's spun aluminum. It's set, really. The big pot is 7 qt. There is a fry pan that is marked "3-8 qt", but is really 2.25 qts. (?)  It came with a bunch of racks and dividers so you can supposedly cook a bunch of different foods at the same time, including a 'rice steamer'.  I call it my "poor man's microwave".

Our big canner is a 20 qt Presto, also spun aluminum. It's a good ol' work horse, and has been through 3 gaskets and 2 gauges in about 30 years.
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #106 on: March 09, 2013, 09:03:19 AM »
Moe, I was talking about a "rocker"or a "gauge" style pressure cooker,not a "lets trythis/halfazzed", type cooker. I appreciate your last post. But it is not what I was asking about.
 :D


Although I have that same type pot. I may have to try that method sometime.
Maybe with some rice...
;)

  JB,  I know what you were talking about,  as I said I have no experience with pressure cookers in the wild,  and remembering the number of accidents that happened with them in the "old days" I'm pretty much still leary of them today, I have a modern programable one that's only good for cooking (pretty much useless for canning),  and I don't use that one much either.
 My post wasn't so much to answer your question as much as it was to offer a possible alturnative to actual pressure cooking in the field and a fun try.

  That said,  I'll try very hard in the future not to stray from the specific when replying to your posts,  I know how hard you try at not being grumpy,  I don't think you're quite there yet,  but keep up the good work.   :thumbsup:   :rofl:
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #107 on: March 09, 2013, 09:07:18 AM »
I was trying hard, Moe...I really was... I just haven't "aged" enough yet...LOL
 :D


I really did appreciate the story & idea, though! Really... I will try this sometime soon. I want to try the "rice" cooking anyway.. I really suck at cooking rice.. I have to try it soon... Maybe next outing..
:)
 
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #108 on: March 09, 2013, 09:44:38 AM »
My Grandmother had one of those pressure fry pans.   Thats the pan she'd fry snapping turtle in.  So tender you could cut it with a fork.   I wish I had one of those pans..I'd try that out on a fire. 
 
As for trail foods,  our Family Dollar has a bunch of different bags of dried fruits I'm going to purchase and make Gorp bags.   I'll keep them in the freezer for a 'grab and  go'.    I'll pick up the ones that would go good in bannok or oatmeal.
 
WW.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #109 on: March 09, 2013, 09:54:03 AM »
My Grandmother had one of those pressure fry pans.   Thats the pan she'd fry snapping turtle in.  So tender you could cut it with a fork.   I wish I had one of those pans..I'd try that out on a fire. 
 ....

Here's one in action, WW. Great for quick 'n' dirty meals for 1 or 2 people.

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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #110 on: March 09, 2013, 11:10:23 AM »
I was trying hard, Moe...I really was... I just haven't "aged" enough yet...LOL
 :D


I really did appreciate the story & idea, though! Really... I will try this sometime soon. I want to try the "rice" cooking anyway.. I really suck at cooking rice.. I have to try it soon... Maybe next outing..
:)

  You do know that I'm just poking a little fun at you i'm sure,  and you are a good sport (most of the time  :) ).
 
  Rice is really easy if you remember to do a few things that will help it come out good, 1, washing your white rice will keep it from getting overly sticky,  just put it in a strainer and run it under clear cool water,  in camp, just soak it while moving it around with a spoon,  strain the cloudy water out and rinse one more time.
  2, add your oil or butter, salt and pepper and what ever other seasoning you want to use to your water, then bring it up to a boil.
  3, add the rice to the boiling water,  lower the heat to a slow simmer,  and time it for 15~ 20 minutes,  resist the temptation to lift the lid and give it a stir,  it'll come out better if you don't.
  4, Check your rice at the end of the 15~ 20 minutes, if all the water has been absorbed,  take it off the heat,  fluff it up, cover it again,  and let it stand for another 8~10 minutes.
  5, It's ready,  Eat.  :) 

  I have a great rice cooker,  and it does a lot more than just cook rice perfectly,  but most of the time I find it easier just to make it in a covered sauce pan.
 
  I made the recipe I posted last night with oven fried boneless skinless chicken breasts that I cut in half length ways and then butterflied and pounded to about 1/4" thick,  then used flour and egg wash and Panko breadcrumbs to coat the chicken.
  Next I pan fried the chicken in a 1/4" of oil until the crust was golden brown,  then placed them in a 350 oven on a cookie sheet for about 15 minutes to finish baking.
  Serve with a drizzle of honey mustard sauce............

              Equal parts of  Honey, yellow mustard, and mayo,  whisk until smooth.

  Serve over the chicken or in small dipping dishes on the side.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #111 on: March 10, 2013, 07:56:34 AM »
:D  All is good. Thnx for the rice tips!
:D
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline ro n d

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #112 on: April 11, 2013, 11:42:25 AM »
I think my all time favorite was chunks of moose meat on a stick roasted over the coals. 
I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #113 on: April 11, 2013, 11:58:30 AM »
I think my all time favorite was chunks of moose meat on a stick roasted over the coals.

Simple is often the best!
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #114 on: April 11, 2013, 12:44:50 PM »
I think my all time favorite was chunks of moose meat on a stick roasted over the coals.

  I loves Moose meat,  but I've never had the pleasure of having it roasted on a stick over coals,  my mouth is watering just thinking about it   :drool:.
  I have had Venison that way (Heart & Liver) from fresh kills,  and it is always fantastic,  thanks for activating my rememberer.   :)
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Offline Yeoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #115 on: April 12, 2013, 10:37:24 AM »
My buddy and I will often arrive at a campsite in the woods quite late on a Friday after work. We'll set up the fire and and skewer a small roast on a stick and put it on an angle over the fire. We'll then work on the shelter. Every once in awhile we'll just cut off a hunk of the outside cooked meat. Kind of like a hunk of donair meat in a pizza shop.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #116 on: April 12, 2013, 10:45:12 AM »
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
:D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
:)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Yeoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #117 on: April 12, 2013, 12:39:29 PM »
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
:D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
:)

Yeah, of course it's the best way. It has to be. It's the way that causes cancer. ;)
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #118 on: April 12, 2013, 08:17:50 PM »
Then I figure I'm in Big trouble.
:D
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #119 on: April 12, 2013, 09:54:14 PM »
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
 :D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
 :)

Yeah, of course it's the best way. It has to be. It's the way that causes cancer. ;)

Yeah...the FDA takes the fun outta everything.  Are eggs good for us, or bad for us this week???
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Offline Bearhunter

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Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #120 on: April 12, 2013, 09:58:25 PM »
:thumbsup: Yeoman... I have always liked cooking the meat that way also.
 :D


Open flame cooked meat is the best way, I think...
 :)

Yeah, of course it's the best way. It has to be. It's the way that causes cancer. ;)

Yeah...the FDA takes the fun outta everything.  Are eggs good for us, or bad for us this week???

LOL...
I hope they're good for us this week, I had 4 today :P
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #121 on: April 13, 2013, 12:27:57 AM »
Funny how they can say that about charred meat when thats the OLDEST way of cooking meat , man has had.
 
I think it was the burning of paints, chemicals, teflons, briquet bonding agents....that rang up the 'danger' on meats.... 
 
Or maybe they did the study using chemically treated railroad ties...  bawaaha ha
 
 
WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #122 on: April 13, 2013, 12:55:22 AM »
Funny how they can say that about charred meat when thats the OLDEST way of cooking meat , man has had.
 
I think it was the burning of paints, chemicals, teflons, briquet bonding agents....that rang up the 'danger' on meats.... 
 
Or maybe they did the study using chemically treated railroad ties...  bawaaha ha
 
 
WW.

I'll just cast my vote for chemical additives in food, freeways too close to the backyard BBQ, and a general effort to divert attention from the real causes of cancer in our modern society. But that's just me.....
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #123 on: April 13, 2013, 08:06:00 AM »

  No matter what you eat,  it's going to kill you anyway,   there's a story about an Indian who firmly believed that eating was a bad habit,  and he set about to prove it,  when his first child was born he decided to prove his idea,  so they didn't feed the child except for water.
  The child died after about four days,  one of his close friends was trying to console the father by telling him that the child was in a better place and surrounded by the elders that had gone before them,  the dad remarked that he understood that, but was diappointed that the baby wasn't able to grow up to prove his belief that eating was just a bad habit,  citing that It was too bad because he was just getting used to not eating.   
                         :shrug:
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #124 on: April 13, 2013, 09:36:51 AM »
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #125 on: April 13, 2013, 09:51:38 AM »
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
:shrug: I don't know what 'story' you're referring to, WW, but you've caused me to shake my head a time or two yourself! :taunt:

You're pork steak D.O. dish sounds a lot like something my brother and I do a lot when we're busy out at the farm and want something hot out of the oven for lunch.  Good stuff!
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #126 on: April 13, 2013, 10:22:07 AM »
Who me??    :P      The story of your Indian and the habit of eating had me shaking my head. 
 
Tonight I plan on making a tator tot casserole in the dutch oven.   I would think it would make an ok camp dinner since its not overly important for the tots to be frozen by then.
 
WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #127 on: April 13, 2013, 10:30:40 AM »
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
:shrug: I don't know what 'story' you're referring to, WW, but you've caused me to shake my head a time or two yourself! :taunt:

You're pork steak D.O. dish sounds a lot like something my brother and I do a lot when we're busy out at the farm and want something hot out of the oven for lunch.  Good stuff!

  I think she's reading too fast.   :)
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #128 on: April 13, 2013, 10:35:53 AM »
**Shakes head at Wolfy's story**  It takes all kinds. 
 
Back to camp/cast iron cooking:   I made pork steak last night smothered in onions and mushrooms in the dutch oven.   Scrubbed a few small potatoes and just laid them on top to bake along with the steaks.  If I would have had fresh uncut green beans I would have laid them on top too.  :)   It tasted sooo good.    I want to try this same meal out on the coals in my little 2 qt...serving for one. :)
 
WW.
:shrug: I don't know what 'story' you're referring to, WW, but you've caused me to shake my head a time or two yourself! :taunt:

You're pork steak D.O. dish sounds a lot like something my brother and I do a lot when we're busy out at the farm and want something hot out of the oven for lunch.  Good stuff!

  I think she's reading too fast.   :)

Something's out of synch, for sure! :P
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #129 on: April 13, 2013, 10:50:37 AM »
Nope..  my problem is not having my glasses on and not paying attention to who's telling the story.  SOrry about that guys.   :(
 
I'll go find something constructive to do now....     :-\
 
WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #130 on: April 13, 2013, 11:22:13 AM »
Nope..  my problem is not having my glasses on and not paying attention to who's telling the story.  SOrry about that guys.   :(
 
I'll go find something constructive to do now....     :-\
 
WW.

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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #131 on: November 12, 2013, 09:40:32 AM »
Here's some camp cooking from a hog hunt yesterday.  Hunt yielded no hogs.  But venison fajitas were a nice consolation prize





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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #132 on: November 12, 2013, 09:53:29 AM »
Do you blend your own frajita seasoning, or use a commercial mix? Years ago my BIL got some mix from a restaurant supply outfit, and I've never found anything as good since.
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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #133 on: November 12, 2013, 10:19:11 AM »
Do you blend your own frajita seasoning, or use a commercial mix? Years ago my BIL got some mix from a restaurant supply outfit, and I've never found anything as good since.

For steak meat of any kind I don't like to use seasoning.  For this one I threw in some red pepper but usually do a jalapeno but didn't get one for this trip.  I like to taste the meat and fresh veggies in my fajitas.  Then add a good salsa mix of some kind.
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Offline Yeoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #134 on: November 12, 2013, 10:26:36 AM »
I tried something a bit different the on Sun and Mon while out in the woods.

Sun I did 2 X ramen noodles with their spice packs (veg and spicey chicken) and added a small can of chili tuna. I just boiled water in my little kettle, added the noodles and covered to let them sit for 5 minutes. I drained them a bit, added the spice and tuna, stirred and ate. Hot, hot, hot!

Yesterday, I just mixed a couple of handfuls of brown rice, a handful of quinoa, a small handful of flax seeds, a hand full of corn meal, a handful of lentils and a handful of couscous and a tea spoon of salt. I mixed it all up in a bag and then brought 3/4 of a cup of the mixture with me and a small can of lemon and pepper tuna. I boiled about 2 1/2 cups of water and added the grain mixture and the tuna. I then simmered it over the fire for over an hour until all the grains were cooked (brown rice took longest I suppose). The oil from the tuna kept it from sticking/burning. Very yummy and filling. Something a little different anyways.
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Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #135 on: November 12, 2013, 11:08:57 AM »
I like tuna, and I'm gonna try that, Yeo. Thnx.
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Offline Yeoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #136 on: November 13, 2013, 05:39:23 AM »
KK,
Hope you like it. Those little cans are very convenient. I just burned the can out on the fire afterwards and then after it cooled wrapped it in the zip lock I brought the mixed grains in. The day before I just wrapped it in the Mr. Noodles wrappers.
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #137 on: November 13, 2013, 09:01:15 AM »
I tried something a bit different the on Sun and Mon while out in the woods.

Sun I did 2 X ramen noodles with their spice packs (veg and spicey chicken) and added a small can of chili tuna. I just boiled water in my little kettle, added the noodles and covered to let them sit for 5 minutes. I drained them a bit, added the spice and tuna, stirred and ate. Hot, hot, hot!

Yesterday, I just mixed a couple of handfuls of brown rice, a handful of quinoa, a small handful of flax seeds, a hand full of corn meal, a handful of lentils and a handful of couscous and a tea spoon of salt. I mixed it all up in a bag and then brought 3/4 of a cup of the mixture with me and a small can of lemon and pepper tuna. I boiled about 2 1/2 cups of water and added the grain mixture and the tuna. I then simmered it over the fire for over an hour until all the grains were cooked (brown rice took longest I suppose). The oil from the tuna kept it from sticking/burning. Very yummy and filling. Something a little different anyways.

  I like tuna right out of the can,  I usually buy White Albacor packed in water,  but I can't warm up to tuna mixed in Ramen Noodles,  it's a personal thing I guess,  There is one thing I make once in a while that might sound strange for some but it's not bad for my taste,  I make up a couple of servings of instant mashed potatoes and when done I layer the tuna between two layers of potato and dump a small personal sized serving can of green peas over the top.

  I hear some people complain about instant potatoes being bland tasting,  when I make mine in camp I start with about a cup of water to which I add a pinch of salt, black pepper, a pat of margarine,  a shake of dried onion bits (or powder),  and a heaping table spoon full of powdered milk,  I let that come to a simmer then take it off the heat and add the instant potatoes and stir it up,  then cover and let it set for a few minutes,  give it another stir and adjust for texture if needed.
 A lot of folks just use water and a little salt and they end up with a bland mushy paste,  but done my way they are almost as good as the real thing.

  BTW,  not to sound untraveled  :),  what is Chili Tuna ? 
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Offline Yeoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #138 on: November 13, 2013, 10:43:35 AM »
I like your potato recipe Moe. I don't mind instant potatos but I'm sure I'd prefer them more if they were like yours.
As for the chili tuna, you're not untravelled; I'd never seen them before this past weekend. Its just a little tiny can of tuna packed with some chili peppers in the oil. It's quite spicey. There are a whole variety of flavours now. It's like what they did with sardines and kippers 25 years ago to make them more marketable.
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Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #139 on: November 13, 2013, 05:19:57 PM »
Fish in a can... Mmmmm!

I like kippers, sardines, tuna etc., but haven't tried many warm recipes with it. - especially outside. But once, a couple from Indonesia made something wrapped in banana leaves that was essentially tuna in coconut milk flavoured rice. It was warm. And spicy. And it was A-mazzzzing! Never had a warm dish with tuna since that was its equal.

"Tuna noodle casserole, avec kd" is about the extent of my warm tuna repertoire.
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #140 on: November 13, 2013, 05:37:09 PM »
I like your potato recipe Moe. I don't mind instant potatos but I'm sure I'd prefer them more if they were like yours.
As for the chili tuna, you're not untravelled; I'd never seen them before this past weekend. Its just a little tiny can of tuna packed with some chili peppers in the oil. It's quite spicey. There are a whole variety of flavours now. It's like what they did with sardines and kippers 25 years ago to make them more marketable.

  LOL, thanks Yeoman,  I was trying to picture tunafish swimming in a pool of Mexican Chili,  and I just couldn't wrap my head around that.   :rofl: :cheers:
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #141 on: May 04, 2014, 08:59:26 AM »
 
  Pancakes,   whether at home or in camp they are a quick, easy, and filling meal,  the makings carry well especially if you have the mix with water kind.

  (Personally I prefer to prepare my own by mixing the ingredients myself,   I've had the packaged stuff and some of it is great,  but I'm one of those guys who likes to control what goes into my food as much as possible,  I have some kind of sensitivity to some of those additives that go into prepared packaged food products,  you know,  the ones that are listed on the ingredients label that you can't pronounce the names of  :),   I even get bothered when I eat out sometimes.)

  Any who,  how I mix the batter is pretty much routine,  I like to use Bisquick baking mix,  I add a pinch of salt to taste,  eggs,  milk,  and a little melted butter,  what makes mine different (and better for my taste) is that I add stone ground corn meal to the dry mix,   then add the liquid and fold it all together (I don't beat the lumps out,  it overworks the flour) and let it stand for about five minutes or so before grilling.

  How much corn meal to flour that you use is up to your personal taste,  I've found that 2/3 baking mix and 1/3 corn meal works good for me.

  If you've never tried it,  give it a try, you might like it,  I also add stone ground corn meal to my Bannock and biscuit batter.   
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #142 on: May 04, 2014, 10:44:01 AM »
I don't know if it's been mentioned before, or not, but I came up with the obvious solution to field expedient recipes that call for milk.
The ratio for making milk out of powdered milk is basically 4:1 (1 cup water + 1/4 cup powder = just a tad over 1 cup "milk".
So when I make up biscuit or pancake dry mix from camping, I add powdered milk in proportion to how much milk is required for the batch, and then just substitute water for milk in the field.
The math is pretty simple when you break it down into Tablespoons.  I have one recipe that makes a dozen baking powder biscuits. It calls for 3/4 cu milk. 3/4 cu = 12 Tbs, so I put 3 Tbs of powdered milk in the dry mix, and eventually add the 3/4 cu water when I mix it up at the campsite.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #143 on: May 04, 2014, 11:01:18 AM »
........or you could use THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL recipe 8)
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #144 on: May 04, 2014, 12:48:39 PM »

  OP,  I do use powdered milk from time to time,  but I add it into the baking mix or mix it with water as I need it,  I've found that if it's mixed into the baking mix ahead of time it has a tendency to separate because the milk powder weighs less than the flour in the baking mix,  other times I carry evaporated milk,  I use it in my coffee as a substitute for 1/2 & 1/2,  mixed with water it works well in place of milk.

  Wolfy,  when we were car camping with the kids every other weekend I went through a lot of baking mix,  back then I mixed my own as you suggest,  but now it's just the two of us or I solo camp,  so a large box of Bisquick will last me at least a month using it for home and on the trail,  I find it's easier to just buy it already mixed,  and the difference price wise isn't all that much different,  a large box of Bisquick is close to 4 pounds and costs just under $5.00,  a five pound bag of flour is close to $4.00 and when you add the cost of the salt, baking powder, and lard to make the mix you aren't too far off.
  Now if I was using enough to buy the flour and other stuff in bulk there would be a good savings,  my problem is that it would go bad or get bugs before I got to use it all.

  That said,  what to think about trying the corn meal ? 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #145 on: May 04, 2014, 12:55:18 PM »
If I have it mixed up, I always use a cup of it in my cornbread when we're baking in the Dutch oven on camping trips......seems to make the texture of the cornbread less 'crumbly' :thumbsup:
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #146 on: May 04, 2014, 01:02:18 PM »
If I have it mixed up, I always use a cup of it in my cornbread when we're baking in the Dutch oven on camping trips......seems to make the texture of the cornbread less 'crumbly' :thumbsup:

  Use what ?,  baking mix in your cornbread ?
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #147 on: May 04, 2014, 01:34:39 PM »
Yup :drool:
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #148 on: May 04, 2014, 01:51:11 PM »
Yup :drool:

   How about drifting down to the new Cornbread Recipe thread and giving us your recipe.    :thumbsup:
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #149 on: May 04, 2014, 02:52:56 PM »
Yup :drool:

   How about drifting down to the new Cornbread Recipe thread and giving us your recipe.    :thumbsup:
I just asked Heather what we used for a recipe.  She said :shrug: "I don't know that we ever had one."   As I recall, we used a couple of cups of baking mix, added maybe a half cup of corn meal, a couple of eggs, some milk, maybe a little sugar, poured it into the preheated Dutch oven & baked it until the top was nice & brown.  Tasted good to us. ???
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