Author Topic: Trail foods and camp cooking  (Read 51543 times)

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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #50 on: June 09, 2012, 04:49:43 PM »
The reason I asked was because I came across a bunch of homemade granola recipes and thought these might be good things to make, break into chunks and have in a jar in the car for emergencies.    I dont think they'd go horribly stale in the heat of the car if they are sealed in a jar.  ?      And if the emergency or 'darn I forgot to take something with to eat"  was on a chilly day , just heating up some water and dumping these chunks in would have a hot meal for the gut.

Ideas on this idea?

WW.


Add Peanut butter and/or chocolate chunks/chips & let melt together with the rest... Ya won't need to wait for a reason to eat.
 ;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #51 on: June 09, 2012, 04:57:24 PM »
Not comfortable using a $2 SS dish??? Gotta get a implement from a tractor to cook with?


Geeez, yur not in Paris & looking for foie de gras, escargot, cheese & fine wines, are ya? Just wantin to cook with something lightweight, inexpensive & over a flame/fire...


lookng for something compact & multi-use???... although a "disk" might be alright for a hat ....in a pinch... along with cooking if treated right... I think ya can find something else...
Although I think the suggestions are reasonable.
Personally, I  wouldn't want to carry one  of them disks very far... without a mule or a horse...
 ;)
Options though.. always options...
 :)


Just remember "what" ya have to carry, unless ya got a "way" of carrying.
 :D

I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #52 on: June 11, 2012, 09:29:36 PM »
LOL MnSport... I'm still looking at all my options....       

I have a large wok, and I love using it to stir fry.    But its just too 'bowlish' for taking with me.   I liked that flat pan much better.  :)     A disk fits that flat idea.    And yes.. that disk at the store was heavy.

I'm still looking for a stainless steel bowl thats on the flat side too.  So far everything I've found is quite deep.

I found some hubcaps in the barn the other day....  oooold ones...  bowl shaped.... I'm still debating on pounding them flatter... LOL     

Moe,  Please post more ideas on what foods you take out for meal making.     If the wind ever stops here I'd like to try your stew out on the six footer stove and my lil cast iron pot.   I wont be hauling it anywhere far...but just want to say I can do it outdoors.  :)

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #53 on: June 11, 2012, 10:35:40 PM »
LOL MnSport... I'm still looking at all my options....       

I have a large wok, and I love using it to stir fry.    But its just too 'bowlish' for taking with me.   I liked that flat pan much better.  :)     A disk fits that flat idea.    And yes.. that disk at the store was heavy.

One thing about woks is there are a bunch of different styles. The deep "bowl" type are western China, or Japanese.  Other areas have different designs
The Mandarin-style pans are much more shallow. This style also lets you make whatever length handle you want in the field, if you can whittle a stick.

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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #54 on: June 12, 2012, 12:13:45 AM »
I think I can whittle a stick..   where did you find that one OP?     

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #55 on: June 12, 2012, 12:29:45 AM »
I think I can whittle a stick..   where did you find that one OP?     

WW.
It's a 12" pan. There are different sizes here, also.

http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com/town-food-equipment/34742/p374509.aspx

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Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #56 on: June 12, 2012, 09:15:08 AM »
Another option I was looking at briefly was a paella pan.  Smallest I could find though was 11" and I wanted something more in the 9" range.
http://www.amazon.com/Paella-Carbon-Steel-Pan-11-Inch/dp/B003XUO2D0/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1339509535&sr=8-5&keywords=paella+pan+carbon+steel

A crepe pan might fit the bill too, they come in all different sizes:
http://www.amazon.com/De-Buyer-5303-24-steel-crepe/dp/B0019N4ZHQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1339509612&sr=1-1&keywords=crepe+pan+carbon+steel

It's funny you mentioned a hubcap, WW.  I was thinking the exact same thing yesterday.......usi ng a baby moon VW hubcap with the plating stripped off.  That's almost as bushcrafty as making one out of sheet steel!
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #57 on: June 12, 2012, 10:29:44 AM »
LOL MnSport... I'm still looking at all my options....       

I have a large wok, and I love using it to stir fry.    But its just too 'bowlish' for taking with me.   I liked that flat pan much better.  :)     A disk fits that flat idea.    And yes.. that disk at the store was heavy.

I'm still looking for a stainless steel bowl thats on the flat side too.  So far everything I've found is quite deep.

I found some hubcaps in the barn the other day....  oooold ones...  bowl shaped.... I'm still debating on pounding them flatter... LOL     

Moe,  Please post more ideas on what foods you take out for meal making.     If the wind ever stops here I'd like to try your stew out on the six footer stove and my lil cast iron pot.   I wont be hauling it anywhere far...but just want to say I can do it outdoors.  :)

WW.

  I'm going to be sending out your package this afternoon,  you'll find a book in the package titled "Doin' Dutch Oven" by Robert Ririe,  it's got a lot of great recipies in it for all manner of foods,  I've adopted a lot of my ideas for trail cooking from this book,  and the recipies are easily converted to other ways of cooking other than the Dutch oven,  I think you'll like it,  and i think it will give you a lot of ideas that you can tailor to your way of doing things.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #58 on: June 12, 2012, 11:58:05 AM »
Thank you , Moe!       I guess I'm going to get my new dutch oven dirty.. :)        My ultimate goal would be to learn to bake bread/buns/biscuits in it...   you'd probably hear me hollar from away over here..  LOL

Do you use alot of chicken to cook with outdoors in these ovens?

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #59 on: June 12, 2012, 12:44:42 PM »
Thank you , Moe!       I guess I'm going to get my new dutch oven dirty.. :)        My ultimate goal would be to learn to bake bread/buns/biscuits in it...   you'd probably hear me hollar from away over here..  LOL

Do you use alot of chicken to cook with outdoors in these ovens?

WW.

  Well this book has a few chapters that cover baking breads and pastries,  how to do it as well as recipies for doughs and batters,  including sour dough recipes,  many of them give you oven temps and conversions to how many coals to use for the Dutch Oven top and bottom, as well as times.
  I thought you'd like it.
 
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #60 on: June 12, 2012, 01:00:35 PM »
I do think I will.. I dont have a dutch oven or outdoor cooking book.  :)     

Does pheasant fit into trail food?      I'm about to plug one.. he's been wandering around my house and since my windows are open his call every 10 mins is driving me nuts..   I've hollared at him a few times.. Told him to go find another girlfriend.. I'm taken.    But it seems he's determined......... ..    Even threats to tie his butt feathers to a hook for fishing gear dont scare him.....

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #61 on: June 12, 2012, 03:21:56 PM »
I do think I will.. I dont have a dutch oven or outdoor cooking book.  :)     

Does pheasant fit into trail food?      I'm about to plug one.. he's been wandering around my house and since my windows are open his call every 10 mins is driving me nuts..   I've hollared at him a few times.. Told him to go find another girlfriend.. I'm taken.    But it seems he's determined......... ..    Even threats to tie his butt feathers to a hook for fishing gear dont scare him.....

WW.

  Phesants are good eats, but they are a pain to pluck,  I usually skin mine,  and they are extra lean,  so you'll have to add fat to the bird to make it moist.

  I marinate mine in Italian salad dressing in a freezer bag over night,  that plumps them up a bit and adds a little flavor,  the next day I rinse the bird with fresh water and pat dry with paper towels,  then I give it a rub with light olive oil,  a little salt and pepper and a sprinkle of dried rosemary,  then I drape the bird with a few strips of bacon and roast it on the middle rack of the oven at 325 until the juces run clear and the legs pull off easy,  it's also good to baste it with pan dripings or a little more salad dressing.
  Serve with oven roasted potatoes and sweet & sour beets,  YUMMMM. 

  BTW-  you have a PM.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #62 on: June 12, 2012, 08:44:38 PM »
YUM .. that does sound good.       But I'll have to wait until this fall ....    lucky him.     I'm not so sure he's not roosting in the tree over the house tonight...   goodness whats with that bird?   LOL

Maybe he likes my loud music?   50's on sirus channel?   Or maybe its the comedy of watching me dance?  Good Heavens.. pheasants dont do mating dances do they?    ***rethinking getting curtains***

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #63 on: June 12, 2012, 08:51:50 PM »
...
Maybe he likes my loud music?   50's on sirus channel?   Or maybe its the comedy of watching me dance?  ...
Hummm.... I'm guessing you're NOT dancing barefoot on the deck waving a hammer at him?  ;D
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #64 on: June 12, 2012, 08:54:20 PM »
Not yet.....   I'm pretty dang good with a hammer.....    I just make sure theres not a cloud in the sky afore swingin it.

:P


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #65 on: January 21, 2013, 03:45:05 AM »
This is kind of a "Bump", but I was just thinking about beverages.This topic, Trail foods and camp cooking that Moe M. started some time ago, came to mind.So, in the interest of reviving this topic,and also so that I don't need to make a new topic, (Unless someone else wants it to be a newtopic), I thought I would ask my question here.


In regard to Trail foods... What type of beverages to you like to carry, or make when you are out? I am not talking about plain water, but things like tea, coffee, cocoa , koolaid, boullion, etc..


    I carry different items to mix in my water & sometimes I also carry a few brews(beer). Occasionally, even an adult beverage of the distilled type. Many times dependent of how long I am going to be out, how much I want to carry with me at the time & convenience. Some folks like to drink the same thing all the time, & others like me, like to change things up a bit & take different things... I usually have all the items I listed above with me at sometime or another or an assortment so I can make what ever strikes me as a tasty drink at the time. As an example, I really like to have a cup of bullion, just as much as tea or coffee when it is cold out... But I am curious to hear what others prefer. So , are you the type who sticks to one or or maybe 2 types, or many like I do. Along with the OP & topic Moe M. started here, about Trail Foods & camp cooking , and the subject of what they are bringing along to eat & how they are cooking the food... Maybe some folks can also add what they like to drink when out & about in the outdoors..


{Moe M. - if ya would like me to remove this post & start a separate topic, I will do so, no problem. :) Just thought to try to include it with this(your)topic as it is closely related, as far as I see it. :) }
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #66 on: January 21, 2013, 06:13:48 AM »
At the dollar store I found boxes of Hawiian Punch singles in four or five different flavors.   I put a few of each flavor in with the pack.   
 
I also have coffee singles, tea bags, and apple cider singles along.   
 
I'm afraid of heating up some water and it will have a nasty taste to it...so now I have something to pour in and hide the flavor.  :)
 
WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #67 on: January 21, 2013, 06:17:22 AM »
This is kind of a "Bump", but I was just thinking about beverages.This topic, Trail foods and camp cooking that Moe M. started some time ago, came to mind.So, in the interest of reviving this topic,and also so that I don't need to make a new topic, (Unless someone else wants it to be a newtopic), I thought I would ask my question here.


In regard to Trail foods... What type of beverages to you like to carry, or make when you are out? I am not talking about plain water, but things like tea, coffee, cocoa , koolaid, boullion, etc..


    I carry different items to mix in my water & sometimes I also carry a few brews(beer). Occasionally, even an adult beverage of the distilled type. Many times dependent of how long I am going to be out, how much I want to carry with me at the time & convenience. Some folks like to drink the same thing all the time, & others like me, like to change things up a bit & take different things... I usually have all the items I listed above with me at sometime or another or an assortment so I can make what ever strikes me as a tasty drink at the time. As an example, I really like to have a cup of bullion, just as much as tea or coffee when it is cold out... But I am curious to hear what others prefer. So , are you the type who sticks to one or or maybe 2 types, or many like I do. Along with the OP & topic Moe M. started here, about Trail Foods & camp cooking , and the subject of what they are bringing along to eat & how they are cooking the food... Maybe some folks can also add what they like to drink when out & about in the outdoors..


{Moe M. - if ya would like me to remove this post & start a separate topic, I will do so, no problem. :) Just thought to try to include it with this(your)topic as it is closely related, as far as I see it. :) }

  Nope,  stay right where you are, it's all good.

  But since you asked,  Personally I have a problem with plain water,  having discussed the problem in the past I've found that a lot of folks do as well,  my problem is the bland taste of plain water.
  There's times like in the heat of summer that there's nothing better than good, cold, filtered water,  but for me it doesn't happen all that often,  i'm a soda lover,  but I try to keep it in check,  iced tea, iced coffee, carbonated water both flavored and not are my favorites,  i'm not a kool-aid kind of guy,  but Gateraid and those types of cold drinks I find are also good anytime.
  I've tried a few of the powdered mixes for water like those in the straws that you rip the top off and pour into water,  they are all either sugarless or made with sugar substitutes and taste like crap to me as well.
  So for me,  trail drinks are usually tea, coffee, plain water, hot choclate, coffee with a little hot choclate mixed into it,  or powdered lemonaid, or iced tea mixed with water,  day hikes will find an occational Coke or Bud in my pack,  in damp of cool weather I tote a flask of flavored brandy along as well.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #68 on: January 21, 2013, 09:56:03 AM »
Of all the powdered drink mixes I've tried (which is very few), I have to favor Crystal Lite (tm) for flavor. I've even used it as a mixer with rum.  :P
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Offline Draco

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #69 on: January 21, 2013, 08:20:36 PM »
The only thing I do is instant coffee.  The rest of the time it is water for me. 

On the subject of trail food I go for the easy stuff but as I have said I am first and foremost a backpacker and try to go light.  Yes I do Mountain House but I also do the freezer bag cooking.  Some of my favorite is one cup instant rice and one package of Lipton soup mix.  Add a cup of boiling water and wait 5 minutes or so then dump in a package of chicken or tuna.  Very filling and pretty darn tasty without all the sodium of Mountain House. 

One thing I have not tried is scrambled eggs in a freezer bag.  You crack the eggs in the bag and then put the bag in boiling water and stir every once in a while.  Has anyone ever tried this?  I have done it in a microwave but not in boiling water. 

Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #70 on: January 21, 2013, 08:41:24 PM »
Yeah, we've done that with the Boy Scout troop.....real handy way to get everybody fed, fast!  A kettle or Dutch oven part way filled with boiling water, some finely minced peppers, onions, crumbled bacon, chopped Spam, browned & crumbled sausage, croutons, salt & pepper, hot sauce, etc. for each boy to customize his eggs and an indelible marker to write his name on the outside of the bag and let 'em do there own.  Crack a couple of eggs in each bag, squish them around after adding whatever they want in them, zip them and toss into the kettle for 5-7 minutes, pick them out, unzip and eat out of the bag.  If you are careful, you don't even need a spoon :P.   Toss the bag in the carry-out trash and we're ready to start our daily activity or class! :thumbsup:
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #71 on: January 21, 2013, 08:50:23 PM »
I've learned to like plain water, but only clean filtered stuff from the fridge or a bottle. Boiled creek water needs some sprucing up with something to make it taste better. I like that Mio water stuff that comes in a little squirt bottle. There is enough in one bottle to flavor a gallon or more depending on how strong you make it.

Offline Draco

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #72 on: January 21, 2013, 09:06:44 PM »
I will have to give it a try Wolfy.  Some eggs for breakfast sure sounds better than oatmeal. 

PW Creek water is not too bad.  It is that nasty green swamp water with the dead floaty things that I have to hold my nose to drink down.  :)  But get me thirsty enough and it's all good. 

Offline Bearhunter

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Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #73 on: January 21, 2013, 09:56:07 PM »
I will have to give it a try Wolfy.  Some eggs for breakfast sure sounds better than oatmeal. 

PW Creek water is not too bad.  It is that nasty green swamp water with the dead floaty things that I have to hold my nose to drink down.  :)  But get me thirsty enough and it's all good.
I bet the green swamp water is pretty close to the pond water I use to drink as a kid :D
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #74 on: January 21, 2013, 10:37:33 PM »
A package of Chicken Rice-a-Roni along with its flavor pack put into about five cups of water and added chicken makes a great soup.  Just ignore the instructions on the box.  Browned hamburger with the beef flavor works nicely too.  Add veggies to either if you need to feed more.
 
WW 
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #75 on: January 30, 2013, 10:12:05 PM »
Making this one a sticky.

Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #76 on: February 19, 2013, 08:09:30 AM »
   I've been reading over some of the posts in this thread and thought I give it a bump up to keep it from going stale and add a bit of something to keep it interesting to some.

   I'm not a big fan of prepackaged backpacking foods like Mountainhouse or Coleman freeze dried meals,  though there are a  few that I do enjoy,  Romens and the series of "sides" that Knor's put out are pretty good,  and Orida instant potatoes are pretty quick to prepare and easily doctored to make them taste good.
  Rice is something that I enjoy on the trail quite a bit,  but being old school and fussy about the taste of what I eat I'm not prone to using quick fix or minute type fixings,  real cooked oatmeal and real steamed rice is so much better in taste and texture than the "dump in boiling water, Wait a minute and eat" stuff that it's worth the extra little time to prepare and cook in my opinion.
  One of my favorites is my version of oriental rice,  for this I carry a small sandwich zip lock bags of dried veggies,  some granulated bullion,  and some Soy Sauce,  for those who order take out Chinese,  the small packets that you usually get with your order work good for this kind of thing,  and I usually always pack a small yellow onion and a medium sized fresh potato in my food bag,  they can be used in many different ways so the little extra weight is worth it.
  How I fix my rice is simple,  I usually use regular long grain white rice,  I wash it (soak in clear water) to get the starch dust off of it and let it drain while I get the rest of my ingredients ready,  I use one cup of dried rice to 1-3/4 cups of water.
  I use my Canteen cup or MSR Seagull pot,  I pour in the water, add a tablespoon full of veggie oil or butter,  salt & pepper to taste,  one heaping teaspoon of Beef or Chicken bullion,  a full tablespoon of dark Soy sauce,  then add about 1/4 cup each of chopped onion and dried veggies (carrots, onion, celery, and what ever else is in the packet.
  Next I bring the liquid to a boil, then pour the rice in and give it a stir,  when the pot comes back to a boil I move it to a cooler place on the fire so that it's at a slow simmer and cover the pot,  it usually takes twenty minutes to cook,  but start checking it after fifteen.
  When the water is all absorbed take the pot away from the heat,  fluff up the rice, recover and let stand for about five minutes or so,  give it another good stir,  and enjoy a hearty and good tasting rice dinner.

  I'm sure that individual tastes differ and that you will be adjusting the ingredients to suit your own likes,  but this is a dish that is easily changed to that end,  you may also as I do, want to add some meat to the dish,  I've used jerky, dried pork, sausage, spam,  and canned tuna in making it and all have been tasty.

  So for you folk that like to do a little cooking in camp and don't mind a little prep,  this makes a pretty quick and delicious meal,  and some mild green tea with it make a great accent to the meal.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #77 on: February 19, 2013, 10:32:08 AM »
Rice is a staple around the world, and so versatile it makes great camp food.
A few years ago we started using Jasmine rice, rather than long grained white rice. Much more flavor, IMO.
The other thing I like about the Jasmine is the cooking time. Whereas long grain might take 20-25 minutes (sometimes 35 depending upon altitude), Jasmine is done in 10. with a 5 minute 'setup time' off the heat at the end.

The only time we rinse our rice is if it comes from China. Indian or Japanese rice doesn't really need it, at least not for safety reasons.

Like Moe, we measure the rice and water, bring the water to a boil, dump in the rice (and any herbs/flavoring) and return to a boil.  And I totally agree that 'instant' rice tastes like crap...about like using 'Quick Oats'.

I learned a trick from my BIL years ago. If you don't have any way to measure the proportions of rice to water, do this: 
Rice is going to just about double in volume, so put an appropriate amount of rice grains in your pot. Add cold water until the water level is about one finger knuckle above the top of the rice. For most people that's about an inch, and an easy way to measure. It doesn't mater how much, or how little rice you're using, that's going to give you the proper rice to water ratio.  Bring the pot to a boil, cover and start timing according to the type of rice you're using, and the altitude.  Carry on as usual with letting it rest and fluffing it up.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #78 on: February 19, 2013, 10:52:18 AM »
And another thing about rice, it can be dried up again after a meal if you used too much or cannot eat the whole meal.   Just spread it out on tin foil near the fire to dry back up.   Pack into a baggy.   When the next meal comes around, just add some water and simmer it back to life again. :)   
 
I've done this with just plain rice and saved the left overs.  Instead of water I heat up milk, toss in some sugar/cinnamon and then added the left over rice for a breakfast meal.  Having some butter with you for a good dallop makes it taste richer.
 
 
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #79 on: February 19, 2013, 11:47:26 AM »
Rice is a staple around the world, and so versatile it makes great camp food.
A few years ago we started using Jasmine rice, rather than long grained white rice. Much more flavor, IMO.
The other thing I like about the Jasmine is the cooking time. Whereas long grain might take 20-25 minutes (sometimes 35 depending upon altitude), Jasmine is done in 10. with a 5 minute 'setup time' off the heat at the end.

The only time we rinse our rice is if it comes from China. Indian or Japanese rice doesn't really need it, at least not for safety reasons.




Like Moe, we measure the rice and water, bring the water to a boil, dump in the rice (and any herbs/flavoring) and return to a boil.  And I totally agree that 'instant' rice tastes like crap...about like using 'Quick Oats'.

I learned a trick from my BIL years ago. If you don't have any way to measure the proportions of rice to water, do this: 
Rice is going to just about double in volume, so put an appropriate amount of rice grains in your pot. Add cold water until the water level is about one finger knuckle above the top of the rice. For most people that's about an inch, and an easy way to measure. It doesn't mater how much, or how little rice you're using, that's going to give you the proper rice to water ratio.  Bring the pot to a boil, cover and start timing according to the type of rice you're using, and the altitude.  Carry on as usual with letting it rest and fluffing it up.
 

  I like Jasmine also,  but my wife is not fond of it,  when i can get it I use Basmatti instead of long grain white,  for the last six months or so Stop and Shop's store brand long grain white has been extra long and extra tender,  so I've stocked up on it.
  I have been washing my white rice for a long time,  I was wathing an episode of Good Eats one day devoted to cooking rice,  Elton explained that in the processing of white rice a starchy dust was created that stuck to the rice,  when cooked the dust makes the rice sticky which is great when it's all you have and your making sushi,  but I like my rice fluffy and tender,  washing it as he suggested makes it a lot better for my taste texture wise.
  Flavored rice and Brown rice doesn't and shouldn't be washed for best results.

  Excellent tip BYW OP on measuring rice to water mixture.

  Another is, when cooking white rice the rule of thumb is equal parts of rice and water,  but,  less water will give you a fluffier rice,  more water will give you a more dense and moist texture.
  I prepare mine using a measure of 1-cup of rice to 1-3/4 cups of water,  cook it approx. 20 minutes at a slow simmer after the initial boil,  and letting it set for 8 ~ 10 minutes off the heat covered after fluffing it up a bit with a fork.
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #80 on: February 19, 2013, 11:52:35 AM »
And another thing about rice, it can be dried up again after a meal if you used too much or cannot eat the whole meal.   Just spread it out on tin foil near the fire to dry back up.   Pack into a baggy.   When the next meal comes around, just add some water and simmer it back to life again. :)   
 
I've done this with just plain rice and saved the left overs.  Instead of water I heat up milk, toss in some sugar/cinnamon and then added the left over rice for a breakfast meal.  Having some butter with you for a good dallop makes it taste richer.
 
 
WW.

   I usually make 1-1/2 cups of dry rice to just under 3-cups of water and what ever seasonings (salt,pepper, butter), for the two of us,  we like rice, so it's usually gone in a couple of days,  but when we do end up with left over rice it usually ends up as rice pudding.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #81 on: February 19, 2013, 12:13:01 PM »
I like a REALY dry rice, and rinsing off the starch dust helps, for sure. The reason I mentioned the Chinese rice is that rinsing rice from China, or Southeast Asia is a health issue. Not only the conditions under which the rice is processed, but packaged as well. I wish I had the link handy, but reading some of the advice about buying and cooking rice would make your socks curl!

We add all sorts of stuff to our rice as it's cooking. Our whole family favorite is Rosemary Rice.  A heaping tablespoon of dried rosemary to 1 1/2 cu dry rice is a good place to start.

Moe, if you like fluffy tender rice give this a shot:
We cook all our rice in either a stainless sauce pan, or restaurant grade aluminum pot. This won't work in a rice cooker.
Put just a small amount of your favorite frying oil/shortening in your rice pot. Just enough to swirl around and coat the bottom. Dump in your rice. Stir and fry the rice until you see a few grains starting to turn translucent or even brown. Slowly pour in your pre-measured cold water. Yes, stand back!  The cold water fractures the hulls of the hot rice and 'pops' them slightly. Bring to a boil and proceed as usual.  You'll notice when you get to the fluffing stage, that the rice is the least sticky you've probably ever seen, and the grains are wonderfully tender.
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #82 on: February 19, 2013, 12:26:06 PM »
I like a REALY dry rice, and rinsing off the starch dust helps, for sure. The reason I mentioned the Chinese rice is that rinsing rice from China, or Southeast Asia is a health issue. Not only the conditions under which the rice is processed, but packaged as well. I wish I had the link handy, but reading some of the advice about buying and cooking rice would make your socks curl!

We add all sorts of stuff to our rice as it's cooking. Our whole family favorite is Rosemary Rice.  A heaping tablespoon of dried rosemary to 1 1/2 cu dry rice is a good place to start.

Moe, if you like fluffy tender rice give this a shot:
We cook all our rice in either a stainless sauce pan, or restaurant grade aluminum pot. This won't work in a rice cooker.
Put just a small amount of your favorite frying oil/shortening in your rice pot. Just enough to swirl around and coat the bottom. Dump in your rice. Stir and fry the rice until you see a few grains starting to turn translucent or even brown. Slowly pour in your pre-measured cold water. Yes, stand back!  The cold water fractures the hulls of the hot rice and 'pops' them slightly. Bring to a boil and proceed as usual.  You'll notice when you get to the fluffing stage, that the rice is the least sticky you've probably ever seen, and the grains are wonderfully tender.

  Thanks, I'll give that a try,  I generally make my rice in a SS covered sauce pan,  when I'm in a hurry or if I'm making specialty rice like my oriental rice I might use my rice cooker,  the thing make great rice,  but it's actually easier to just clean the SS pan than to get out the cooker, plug it in,  and then have to clean the cooker pot and the rubber seal around the top of the cooker,  mostly I use it as a small stew pot , steamer, or pressure cooker.
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #83 on: February 19, 2013, 12:56:45 PM »
Something I found a few years ago is that frozen meat keeps pretty well on the trail.
I discovered this by two accidents.
I was doing a five day hike on the Juan De Fuca Trail on Vancouver Island. I had frozen a small steak and put it in a ziplock bag and planned to eat it that night. Problem was that it was still frozen solid after a day in my pack in +25 deg C (80ish F) weather. I boiled it.
A few days later I discovered something else. The area inside my pack, next to the outer side of my pack was cold. Not cool, cold. My socks and my sweater were in the clothing bag at that spot and they felt like they had been in a fridge. I couldn't get over it until I was packing up the next day and lashed 2L soft resevoire to the outside of my pack. Aha! evaporation. Got it.
I thus experimented with keeping frozen food in my pack against the redneck a/c. I've kept a steak frozen for three days. Bacon and ground beef or veggie ground round don't seem to have the mass to stay frozen as well or as long but they'll last many days longer than you'd think.
I wrap a steak or pork chop in cling wrap then a layer of newspaper and then put the whole thing in a baggie. This goes into the food bag. If I have a sweater or a towel then I wrap the whole food bag in it and position it in my pack to be against the outside wall right next to the water bladder.
It makes for heavier food loads but hey, yummy!
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Offline xune

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #84 on: February 19, 2013, 01:14:09 PM »
Wow Yeoman, didn't think that a steak could stay frozen for so long in such weather! Thanks for the tip, I'll have to try that out!
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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #85 on: February 19, 2013, 03:04:55 PM »
Something I found a few years ago is that frozen meat keeps pretty well on the trail.
I discovered this by two accidents.
I was doing a five day hike on the Juan De Fuca Trail on Vancouver Island. I had frozen a small steak and put it in a ziplock bag and planned to eat it that night. Problem was that it was still frozen solid after a day in my pack in +25 deg C (80ish F) weather. I boiled it.
A few days later I discovered something else. The area inside my pack, next to the outer side of my pack was cold. Not cool, cold. My socks and my sweater were in the clothing bag at that spot and they felt like they had been in a fridge. I couldn't get over it until I was packing up the next day and lashed 2L soft resevoire to the outside of my pack. Aha! evaporation. Got it.
I thus experimented with keeping frozen food in my pack against the redneck a/c. I've kept a steak frozen for three days. Bacon and ground beef or veggie ground round don't seem to have the mass to stay frozen as well or as long but they'll last many days longer than you'd think.
I wrap a steak or pork chop in cling wrap then a layer of newspaper and then put the whole thing in a baggie. This goes into the food bag. If I have a sweater or a towel then I wrap the whole food bag in it and position it in my pack to be against the outside wall right next to the water bladder.
It makes for heavier food loads but hey, yummy!

  You are right,  it is amazing how long some foods will stay frozen and thaw slowly enough to keep them fresh for an extended period even in warm weather,  about eight years ago six of us did a three day primitive camp out in central CT., it was in late August,  the weather was damp and hot,  the bugs were the worst problem at night,  but the days were not bad.
  We had planned our food around stuff that didn't need refrigeration except for the first night,  we had planned to have ribeye steaks w/baked potato and greens,  Marshall was in charge of getting the steaks at his local butcher shop,  he picked them up the week before the trip and froze them wrapped separately in plastic wrap then placed in a zip lock freezer bag.
  The morning of the event he wrapped the bag in news paper just in case they leaked through the freezer bag when thawing,  he then wrapped that in his rain jacket and put it in his pack,  that evening he took the steaks out and they were still froze solid,  we made something else and decided to see how long the steaks would stay frozen,  we ended up having them on the third day,  but we had to take them out of their news paper wrap to get them to finish thawing in time for dinner.
  I have no doubt that they would have been thawed by day four,  but cold enough to have been fresh enough to cook on day five.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #86 on: February 19, 2013, 03:20:23 PM »
That's standard operating procedure in the BWCA, too.  Chicken is usually taken for the first night out and steaks for the second night, but there have been times when we had to eat one of our dehydrated meals the first night and then have the chicken and beef for the 2nd & 3rd night's meals because they were still frozen.  Usually the steaks are just this side of having ice in them on third night, too :thumbsup:
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #87 on: February 19, 2013, 05:21:44 PM »
Thanks Moe M., for your tips on making a rice dish "out in the sticks". Your description of how you make it in a G.I. canteen cup was a pretty darn good description/recipe, for those of us who use them.
 :thumbsup:


The "finger" rule that ... I think Old P. mentioned is a good one to remember also.
 :)


 I can handle rice every once in a while, & it is easy to carry, & fairly non- perishable...  but I am not a good "rice" cook/chef. I can cook/BBQ/etc. a lot of things, open fire/pit stove top etc...but I am a crappy "rice" guy. Must be that I am Scots-Irish...
Give me Meat & Potatoes.. no troubles.. Rice...not so good.. Particularly brown rice..


Thnx again for your mention of it here, in the "Trail foods & camp cooking" topic.
It is a great subject. Your post earlier, to help all of us in knowing a good recipe & idea to try, using rice, is a great addition to the topic, IMO.
 :D


BTW...Yeomans talking about bringing meat along ona trip, is more along the way I do things. I much prefer eating what is provided thru your own efforts, on trips where you can hunt or fish, more than trips where I have to bring things. I am definitely not a fan of things you add boiling water in the bag/pot, in order make it edible.  Although, I will use them "in a pinch",or on a short trip.
 :)
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 05:28:08 PM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Anubis1335

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #88 on: February 19, 2013, 05:41:04 PM »
Boneless chicken breasts (or thighs) or hamburger wrapped in foil w/ onion and potato is pretty good grub.  bell pepper or jalapeno added is great w/ it too.  Put ingredients in foil wrap up place near fire. 

A good lil ez dessert is a dump cake in a DO.  If you're packin in the DO the ingredients weight is no big whoop. 

Can of crushed pineapple or two depending on DO size
2 cans of fruit pie filling...cherry, blueberry, blackberry etc
box of white cake (use the mix dry...do not add any of the ingredients to make it a cake)
some melted butter or margarine.  (im assuming since you are packin that heavy @ss DO, you got an ice chest too)

LINE YOUR DO W DO LINERS!!! 
then place all the ingredients in the order i typed them...
Drizzle w/ melted butter or margarine
Bake til bubbly. 

Pretty EZ "cobbler". 

MY mini-me absolutely loves it <3
OINK!

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #89 on: February 19, 2013, 06:33:30 PM »
Anubis, I wonder if we could figure out a way to do single servings of that dessert?   Like using frozen blueberries and frozen chunks of pineapple with a handful of mini marshmellows in the bottom of the GI mess kit, a 1/4 cup of that cake mix spread over and drizzle with butter?  Bake in that closed mess kit like you would a DO with a few coals on top?   Parchment paper could be cut to fit for a liner.
 
What do you think?  Will this work?   I wish I wasnt hiney deep in snow up here.. I'd go out and try it. :)
 
WW.
 
 
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Anubis1335

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #90 on: February 19, 2013, 06:40:45 PM »
i bet it sho 'nuff would work WW. 

I have said usgi mess kit and the canteen cup...and i also have a german mess kit that it may work in as well...HMMMMMMM.... seems like an experiment is in order

actually you could just whittle down the canned ingredients...i bet the extras would keep well in the fridge.  and the cake mix you just have to put a decent layer over...no idea how that would translate into measurements.  and the extra could be kept in a ziplock baggie as well


Really cool idea WW!  :thumbsup:
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Offline Draco

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #91 on: February 19, 2013, 06:43:42 PM »
I just find Dr. McDougall's soups and Asian (Ramon Noodles) cups.  The dry ingredients can be taken out of the cups and put in zip lock.  They are not as cheap as regular Ramon Noodles but they are much less than Mountain House.  They are pretty good.  At least they are different as I am getting pretty tired of the two or three Mountain House ones I like.  ;) 

Online Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #92 on: February 27, 2013, 10:47:47 AM »
Thanks Moe M., for your tips on making a rice dish "out in the sticks". Your description of how you make it in a G.I. canteen cup was a pretty darn good description/recipe, for those of us who use them.
 :thumbsup:


The "finger" rule that ... I think Old P. mentioned is a good one to remember also.
 :)


 I can handle rice every once in a while, & it is easy to carry, & fairly non- perishable...  but I am not a good "rice" cook/chef. I can cook/BBQ/etc. a lot of things, open fire/pit stove top etc...but I am a crappy "rice" guy. Must be that I am Scots-Irish...
Give me Meat & Potatoes.. no troubles.. Rice...not so good.. Particularly brown rice..


Thnx again for your mention of it here, in the "Trail foods & camp cooking" topic.
It is a great subject. Your post earlier, to help all of us in knowing a good recipe & idea to try, using rice, is a great addition to the topic, IMO.
 :D


BTW...Yeomans talking about bringing meat along ona trip, is more along the way I do things. I much prefer eating what is provided thru your own efforts, on trips where you can hunt or fish, more than trips where I have to bring things. I am definitely not a fan of things you add boiling water in the bag/pot, in order make it edible.  Although, I will use them "in a pinch",or on a short trip.
 :)

   Mtn.Spts.,  I may have mentioned it here somewhere before but it's worth mentioning again,  I like regular rice as opposed to minute rice for several reasons, first is that I think I can control the outcome of the rice better,  but more important is that when I'm camp cooking I often make a one pot rice meal,  it's filling and satisfying,  and I dress it up with fillers that make it a meal and not just a bowl of rice,  which works out good because of the extra cooking time of the regular rice over minute rice.
  My grub bag usually contains some fresh produce,  a potato, onion, and a couple of carrots for sure,  and usually a zip lock sandwich bag of assorted dried vegetables of some kind,  I also pack either a small summer sausage, pepperoni stick, or double smoked polish sausage,  all of which keep very well unrefrigerated for up to a week if kept out of the hot sun.
  For a solo meal such as with rice my USGI Canteen cup is ideal,  it works well over coals,  with my alcohol "cat" stove,  and if I'm careful my pocket rocket stove works well also,  but with the PR stove you have to keep an eye out that it doesn't burn the bottom of your rice.
  One of my usual recipes calls for one cup of washed white long grain rice,  two cups of water,  and what ever else I plan to put in it.
  I get my ingredients ready ahead of time,  usually it's one good teaspoon of granulated chicken bullion,  about 1/2 cup of fresh chopped onion,  1/2 a cup of dried veggies (soaked in warm water for about ten minutes), about 1/4 cup of what ever meat you have,  salt, pepper, and a little cayenne pepper to taste,  and one tablespoon of light olive oil.
  I bring the two cups of water to a boil in my canteen cup,  pour in the oil,  then add the seasonings and all the veggies and the meat,  i let it come back to a boil and stir in my rice,  then cover the cup and lower the heat so that I get just a gentle simmer,  it's usually cooked in about 15 or 20 minutes,  take it off the heat, remove the cover and fluff up the rice, making sure to stir up the veggies (they sometimes settle),  replace the cover and let set for another 5 to 8 minutes,  and it's ready to eat.
  Using this recipe you will end up with a full canteen cup of rice entree,  it's filling, so count on having some for breakfast,  covered and cooled it'll keep very well overnight.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #93 on: February 28, 2013, 06:41:53 AM »
Thanks Moe!
:)


  I will try that recipe/method some time when I am out & about, and remember to bring the other items with me. Looks like a good one!
:thumbsup:


Thnx again!
:D
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #94 on: February 28, 2013, 10:24:46 AM »
MNSport..    I dont know if you do the cooking at home or not, but every time you or your wife chop up the onions/peppers/carrots ect. for home cooking put a small amount in a baggy and freeze it.   That way you can just grab a frozen baggy full of veggies on your way out the door.   You can do the same for the meats your having at home.  Just save 1/4 cup of it for a GI meal like described above.  Premeasured rice in a baggy in the freezer will help in grabbing up 'dinner' with it right there ready to go. 
 
I've been doing simular at home here.  I've got small bags full of choppped gr.pepper/onion.. or onion/celery/carrots.   And the other night I saved three strips of bacon out of the pound I needed to fry up and cut those into thirds and froze them raw.  I've got chopped cooked chicken and ham ready to go too.
 
I'm ready for spring outdoor cooking.
 
WW.
 
 
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #95 on: March 08, 2013, 06:59:43 AM »
    I did a search for "pressure cooker" in the search here at B&B. But, none of the posts talked about using one out in the field. I saw one being packed in the video/film that OutdoorEnvy posted in this topic here: Winter Camping: "Sub-Artic Winter Bivouacking"

   But, we never packed or used one, back when I was in doing CWT, & since no one seems to have mentioned using one out in the woods/bush, I thought I would ask here in this topic, about "Trail foods & Camp Cooking", started by Moe, rather than start a new topic.


Anyone ever used a pressure cooker when out in the woods/bush?
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline BUSHYBEARD

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #96 on: March 08, 2013, 07:24:23 AM »
MNSport..    I dont know if you do the cooking at home or not, but every time you or your wife chop up the onions/peppers/carrots ect. for home cooking put a small amount in a baggy and freeze it.   That way you can just grab a frozen baggy full of veggies on your way out the door.   You can do the same for the meats your having at home.  Just save 1/4 cup of it for a GI meal like described above.  Premeasured rice in a baggy in the freezer will help in grabbing up 'dinner' with it right there ready to go. 
 
I've been doing simular at home here.  I've got small bags full of choppped gr.pepper/onion.. or onion/celery/carrots.   And the other night I saved three strips of bacon out of the pound I needed to fry up and cut those into thirds and froze them raw.  I've got chopped cooked chicken and ham ready to go too.
 
I'm ready for spring outdoor cooking.
 


WW.

WW. just remember to "BLANCH" your veggies/fruit before freezing them this will insure keeping there texture

http://www.ochef.com/617.htm

MnS. YA, i noticed that as well, why not? saves on time and fuel etc.
Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda, ain't an option

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #97 on: March 08, 2013, 11:30:56 AM »
Thats an interesting thought on pressure cookers, MnSport.   
 
I wonder if its because a camp dutch oven is easier to maintain heat and opened to check progress more often than a pressure cooker? 
 
But on the other hand less time means less fuel... I like that idea.  :)
 
I have a pressure pot.. I should haul it out and make friends with it again and maybe give that a try over a wood fire.   What are your thoughts on side heat hurting the gasket/handles/ release valve?
 
WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #98 on: March 08, 2013, 11:38:50 AM »
I can see all the advantages to a pressure cooker for camping. However, I would personally only use it on a gas stove. The integrity of the seal/gasket is critical, and being aluminum, it might be very easy to damage it in a cooking fire.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #99 on: March 08, 2013, 01:00:32 PM »
I KNOW I have seen a small model PC built for outdoor high-altitude cooking, but I haven't done a search.   They're out there, though!
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