Author Topic: Just Recipes  (Read 48471 times)

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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #100 on: November 27, 2012, 10:23:12 AM »
This is an easy recipe for WOLFY'S DEER SUMMER SAUSAGE that I have 'diddled' with for years, but I think I'm finished messing with it now.  I just pulled it out of our recipe file to make up a batch with some burger from this year's buck.  Hope all you deer hunters give it a shot and let me know what you think.  We've received accolades from people that have had it and I've given the recipe out on other forums where it has been quite popular, too.  So, if you've got lots of deer burger to deal with, this is a great way to use some of it, but it works fine with beef burger, too.

3# deer burger
2 T liquid smoke
4-5 cloves crushed garlic....or MORE ;)
1 T whole mustard seed
3 T Morton Tender Quick
1 Cup water
1/4 t course-ground fresh black pepper
1/2 t onion powder
2 T brown sugar
1 T red pepper flakes

METHOD:
Mix all the ingredients together and pour over meat while mixing.......I use the dough hook on our KitchenAid stand mixer.  Form into two logs about 3" in diameter & 12" long.  Seal in foil & refrigerate for 24 hours. Punch holes in bottom of foil with a fork.  Place on broiler pan or cake rack on a sheet pan, so fat can drip out during baking.  Bake 1 1/4 hours @ 325 degrees.  Unwrap & cool.  Wrap with plastic wrap & store in refrigerator or freeze.

I mix up 6# at a time, because 3# just doesn't last long enough around here :stir:

This is kind of a 'basic' recipe that we have arrived at to suit different family members' taste 'prejudices', so feel free to experiment by adding different commonly added sausage ingredients that you may crave 8)
« Last Edit: November 27, 2012, 02:12:11 PM by wolfy »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Italian "peasant" bread
« Reply #101 on: December 01, 2012, 11:00:17 AM »
This is a simple, hearty bread that goes well with anything, any time. I make this about 4-5 times a week.
I cheat, and use a bread machine to knead the dough, the first rise, and the second kneading. Then I shape a loaf in a bread pan, let it rise, and bake it in the oven.  I've also just baked it on a greased cookie sheet for the traditional "peasant" loaf.

If you are using a bread machine, add the ingredients in the order given. If not, do it however you want.  You can even mix it all up in a gallon ziploc before taking it out to rise.

2 1/2 tsp yeast (1 packet)
3 cu flour
1 1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 1/3 cu water

That's it!  Mix the dough and let it rise to double the volume.
Knead it vigorously for about 5 minutes.
Grease whatever you're going to use as a cooking surface (D.O., flat rock, etc.) and let it rise a second time to double the volume again. The colder it is, the longer it will take.
Bake at 350o for about 25 minutes.
Cool slightly, cut and enjoy.
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Italian "peasant" bread
« Reply #102 on: December 01, 2012, 11:22:57 AM »
This is a simple, hearty bread that goes well with anything, any time. I make this about 4-5 times a week.
I cheat, and use a bread machine to knead the dough, the first rise, and the second kneading. Then I shape a loaf in a bread pan, let it rise, and bake it in the oven.  I've also just baked it on a greased cookie sheet for the traditional "peasant" loaf.

If you are using a bread machine, add the ingredients in the order given. If not, do it however you want.  You can even mix it all up in a gallon ziploc before taking it out to rise.

2 1/2 tsp yeast (1 packet)
3 cu flour
1 1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 1/3 cu water

That's it!  Mix the dough and let it rise to double the volume.
Knead it vigorously for about 5 minutes.
Grease whatever you're going to use as a cooking surface (D.O., flat rock, etc.) and let it rise a second time to double the volume again. The colder it is, the longer it will take.
Bake at 350o for about 25 minutes.
Cool slightly, cut and enjoy.
   

  I make the same recipe except that mine calls for a couple pf tablespoons of light olive oil,  it's darn good bread,  but sometimes it comes out a little denser than other times, reading this i'm thinking that I may not be Kneading it as long as I should and depending too much on the action of my food processor with the dough blade,  but not wanting to over heat the dough from blade friction.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #103 on: December 01, 2012, 11:29:49 AM »
Must be a 'bread day'.....we had blueberry sourdough pancakes for breakfast this morning.  Since the sourdough was percolating anyway, we mixed up a couple of loaves of bread and they're proofing now  :stir:

The REALLY good news is, there was enough dough left over for a batch of cinnamon rolls, too :banana:
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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #104 on: December 01, 2012, 11:37:00 AM »
Must be a 'bread day'.....we had blueberry sourdough pancakes for breakfast this morning.  Since the sourdough was percolating anyway, we mixed up a couple of loaves of bread and they're proofing now  :stir:

The REALLY good news is, there was enough dough left over for a batch of cinnamon rolls, too :banana:

  You're going to have to buy some bigger bib overalls. :)
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #105 on: December 01, 2012, 11:48:46 AM »
Must be a 'bread day'.....we had blueberry sourdough pancakes for breakfast this morning.  Since the sourdough was percolating anyway, we mixed up a couple of loaves of bread and they're proofing now  :stir:

The REALLY good news is, there was enough dough left over for a batch of cinnamon rolls, too :banana:

  You're going to have to buy some bigger bib overalls. :)

Tell me about it :doh:    Christmas is just around the corner, though :choptree:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Italian "peasant" bread
« Reply #106 on: December 01, 2012, 12:30:29 PM »

  I make the same recipe except that mine calls for a couple pf tablespoons of light olive oil,  it's darn good bread,  but sometimes it comes out a little denser than other times, reading this i'm thinking that I may not be Kneading it as long as I should and depending too much on the action of my food processor with the dough blade,  but not wanting to over heat the dough from blade friction.
It's all dependent upon heat, and especially humidity. Yeast is a plant, so think gardening when making bread.
Cold yeast is not happy yeast. If you can do a "yeast starter" in some tepid water (~90o) for about 15-30 minutes, it's a good thing. The yeast is already growing before being added into the dough.
No all yeast is created equal, by any means! A loaf that may need to only rise for 30 minutes @ 75o air temperature using Rapid Rise Yeast, may take an hour with 'regular' bread yeast.  If you are using wild yeast you've cultivated yourself (from fruit peels, say), you might be looking at 2-3 hours rising time.  The less rise you get from your yeast, the more dense the bread. (Duh.....)  Can't rush good bread.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #107 on: December 01, 2012, 12:47:56 PM »
I think the 'tang' from the longer rise of sourdough-type breads is well worth the wait, too.  I'm kind of addicted to it after using it for so many years.  Then again, ALL homemade bread is good eats!
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Italian "peasant" bread
« Reply #108 on: December 02, 2012, 02:50:25 PM »

  I make the same recipe except that mine calls for a couple pf tablespoons of light olive oil,  it's darn good bread,  but sometimes it comes out a little denser than other times, reading this i'm thinking that I may not be Kneading it as long as I should and depending too much on the action of my food processor with the dough blade,  but not wanting to over heat the dough from blade friction.
It's all dependent upon heat, and especially humidity. Yeast is a plant, so think gardening when making bread.
Cold yeast is not happy yeast. If you can do a "yeast starter" in some tepid water (~90o) for about 15-30 minutes, it's a good thing. The yeast is already growing before being added into the dough.
No all yeast is created equal, by any means! A loaf that may need to only rise for 30 minutes @ 75o air temperature using Rapid Rise Yeast, may take an hour with 'regular' bread yeast.  If you are using wild yeast you've cultivated yourself (from fruit peels, say), you might be looking at 2-3 hours rising time.  The less rise you get from your yeast, the more dense the bread. (Duh.....)  Can't rush good bread.

  Humidity is not much of a problem here,  and i'm at sea level,  I use granulated yeast, keep it refridgerated,  and abide by the experation dates,  I always proof it in luke warm water and feed it with a little sugar and give it a lot of time to bloom,  it's probably in my kneading technique,  I give it two rises with a mild beating in between. 
  It usually comes out great,  but every once in a while it comes out more dense than usual.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Italian "peasant" bread
« Reply #109 on: December 02, 2012, 03:01:36 PM »
...,  it's probably in my kneading technique,  I give it two rises with a mild beating in between. 
  ...
My bread machine is more adept than I. The "second kneading" in the bread machine goes on for a full 5 minutes. Pounds the crap out of it!
Father Dominic, the Benedictine bread monk, said that if your hands didn't get tired kneading, you weren't serious about it. Hahaha!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #110 on: December 02, 2012, 03:17:52 PM »
Kneading is not such a good thing in dealing with sourdough....the less 'kneady' a person is, the better :doh:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #111 on: December 02, 2012, 03:23:12 PM »
Kneading is not such a good thing in dealing with sourdough....the less 'kneady' a person is, the better :doh:
My wife does all the sourdough baking in the house. Babysitting sourdough starter is too much like raising a kid to appeal to me nowadays.  :P
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #112 on: December 02, 2012, 03:37:38 PM »
Kneading is not such a good thing in dealing with sourdough....the less 'kneady' a person is, the better :doh:
My wife does all the sourdough baking in the house. Babysitting sourdough starter is too much like raising a kid to appeal to me nowadays.  :P

Since my wife and I created no progeny of our own, the pitter-patter of little yeasties running rampant within the confines of our sourdough pot is actually quite a comfort in our old age O:-)
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #113 on: December 02, 2012, 03:51:28 PM »
My wife does all the sourdough baking in the house. Babysitting sourdough starter is too much like raising a kid to appeal to me nowadays.  :P

Since my wife and I created no progeny of our own, the pitter-patter of little yeasties running rampant within the confines of our sourdough pot is actually quite a comfort in our old age O:-)
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Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #114 on: December 27, 2012, 08:17:47 PM »
Ok, I thought I had posted this recipe before,  but apparently not. This is my crock pot chili. You will need a big 7 or 8 qt crock pot for this. And it has beans so the name is up for debate in chili purist circles.

Anyhow...

2 cans pinto beans drained and rinsed
2 cans red beans drained and rinsed
3 lbs. Ground beef browned and drained
1 green bell pepper seeded and diced
1 red bell pepper seeded and diced
1 anaheim chili seeded and diced
1 serrano chili seede and minced
5 cloves garlic minced
2 28oz. cans crushed tomatoes
1 12 oz. Can beef broth
1 12 oz. Can tomato paste
3 tsp. Chili powder
2 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp fresh ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients in crock pot and cook on low 8 hours or high 4 hours. Start the crock pot on high if cooking low, until it simmers, then turn back to low. Stir occasionally and before serving.

You may need to add salt before serving. Make sure to check. I like crackers on the side, grated cheddar or colby cheese and sour cream on top.  You can add an extra serrano chili, and a couple of chipotles in adobo if you want more heat. This recipe is very similar to one that came with my first crock pot, with a slight tweak here and there. Jalapenos can be substituted for serannos if they aren't available, and if you cant find an anaheim just use another bell pepper.

For variety you can substitute one of the cans of beans for a can of corn.



Online Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #115 on: December 27, 2012, 08:31:57 PM »
Ok, I thought I had posted this recipe before,  but apparently not. This is my crock pot chili. You will need a big 7 or 8 qt crock pot for this. And it has beans so the name is up for debate in chili purist circles.

Anyhow...

2 cans pinto beans drained and rinsed
2 cans red beans drained and rinsed
3 lbs. Ground beef browned and drained
1 green bell pepper seeded and diced
1 red bell pepper seeded and diced
1 anaheim chili seeded and diced
1 serrano chili seede and minced
5 cloves garlic minced
2 28oz. cans crushed tomatoes
1 12 oz. Can beef broth
1 12 oz. Can tomato paste
3 tsp. Chili powder
2 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp fresh ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients in crock pot and cook on low 8 hours or high 4 hours. Start the crock pot on high if cooking low, until it simmers, then turn back to low. Stir occasionally and before serving.

You may need to add salt before serving. Make sure to check. I like crackers on the side, grated cheddar or colby cheese and sour cream on top.  You can add an extra serrano chili, and a couple of chipotles in adobo if you want more heat. This recipe is very similar to one that came with my first crock pot, with a slight tweak here and there. Jalapenos can be substituted for serannos if they aren't available, and if you cant find an anaheim just use another bell pepper.

For variety you can substitute one of the cans of beans for a can of corn.

  Sounds great PW,  I might substitute cumin for oregano but out side of that I like it,  BTW Boss,  if it's got beans in it it's Chili,  if it doesn't it's just hot meat sauce,  says me.   :)
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Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #116 on: January 04, 2013, 06:29:05 PM »
Thanks Moe!

The recipe does call for cumin, 1 tsp. Would you be doubling up on the cumin or just omitting the oregano? I have made it without the oregano and can't tell much difference.

Online Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #117 on: January 05, 2013, 12:09:06 PM »
Thanks Moe!

The recipe does call for cumin, 1 tsp. Would you be doubling up on the cumin or just omitting the oregano? I have made it without the oregano and can't tell much difference.

   It's difficult to say how much to use,  my Mom taught me to cook by taste,  I seldom follow a recipe unless i'm trying something for the first time,  I don't use oregano very much and even then it's sparingly, oregano is a strong herb,  but funny as it sounds just a little isn't very noticable,  but a hair over that and it imparts a bitter after taste to most foods.
   Cumin is one of the base ingredients in chili powder,  but usually most chili recipes calls for extra,  i've found that I use almost as much cumin as I do chili powder,  depending on my mood I sometimes use a little cinnamon in my chili as well,  and other times a little smoked papprika,  it's fun to experiment with foods like chili.
   When I do chili I usually make a big pot,  no less that 6 ~ 7 quarts in an eight quart pot,  so how much to use depends on how much you're making.
   
   Not everyone can make a good (above average) chili,  I can tell by your recipe that yours is a good one,  but don't be afraid to play around with it a little,  chili is a very forgiving food,  and hard to screw up,  I have a big family and they all love my chili,  but i doubt the it tastes exactly the same each time.   :)
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Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #118 on: January 05, 2013, 12:23:14 PM »
Yeah mine changes due to availability of ingredients as well. ;)

Offline WoodsWoman

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Chili Cheese Tots
« Reply #119 on: January 05, 2013, 08:15:23 PM »
Chili Cheese Tots
 
1 lb. ground beef
2 Cans ( 15 oz each) chili with beans
1 can (8 oz) tomato sauce
1 can (2 1/4 oz) sliced ripe olives drained
1 can ( 4 oz) chopped green chilies
2 cups ( 8 oz) shredded cheddar cheese, divided
1 package ( 32 oz ) frozen tator tots
 
In a large skillet, cook beef over medium heat until no longer pink; drain.  Stir in the chili, tomato sauce, olives, and chilies.  Transfer to two greased 8 in square baking dishes.  Sprinkle with  1 cup cheese; top with Tator Tots. Cover and freeze one casserole for up to 3 months.   
 
Cover and bake the remaining casserole at  350* for  30 - 35 mins. or until heated through. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup cheese.  Bake 5 mins more or until cheese is melted.
 
Note:  I want to try this recipe in my little 2 qt. camp dutch oven. :)   
 
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Offline zammer

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Re: Chili Cheese Tots
« Reply #120 on: January 06, 2013, 10:44:31 AM »
Note:  I want to try this recipe in my little 2 qt. camp dutch oven. :)   
 WW.

That would be cool, do you have an outdoor fire pit WW?
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #121 on: January 06, 2013, 11:18:55 AM »
Kinda sorta..    its just a rectangle made of basement block out there under the snow.   Nothing fancy.
 
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Offline zammer

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #122 on: January 06, 2013, 11:39:34 AM »
Kinda sorta..    its just a rectangle made of basement block out there under the snow.   Nothing fancy.
 
WW.

Fancy shmancy....get that fire lit girl, and take some pics  8)
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Offline BUSHYBEARD

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #123 on: January 06, 2013, 01:38:14 PM »
Butternut squash soup

This is quick and simple and loaded with vitamin D

1 butternut squash
2 or 3 slices of oinion
Nutmeg
salt and pepper

peel and cut up squash in chunks, put in pot and add just enough water to cover, add oinion slices and as much nutmeg as you like and simmer tell tender (approx 10 min)
Now purre in blender with a little of the liquid(carefull), or emercing blender or mash and mix with liquid
add salt and pep to taste...

Saute'd squash;

Peel and cut any type of squash, cut in chunks and saute in oil or butter tell tender, then add TERRAGON and salt and pepper good side dish 
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Offline Anubis1335

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #124 on: January 17, 2013, 12:52:55 PM »
CHICKEN AND STOVE TOP CASSEROLE   
 
3 boneless chicken breasts
1 can cream of mushroom soup
8 oz. sour cream
8 oz. milk
1 box Stove Top stuffing
Salt and pepper to taste
2C Minute Rice

Cut chicken into bite size pieces brown in 1 tablespoon butter. Prepare Stove Top as directed on box. Prepare rice as directed on box, set aside.  Mix together sour cream, mushroom soup, and milk. Mix chicken in with soup mixture. Place in rectangular casserole top with stuffing. Bake at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes. 
Top rice w/ this mixture.  The rice is optional but it really is good w/ the gravy/sauce that gets made

I really do love this stuff.
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Offline BUSHYBEARD

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #125 on: January 17, 2013, 02:42:49 PM »
CHICKEN AND STOVE TOP CASSEROLE   
 
3 boneless chicken breasts
1 can cream of mushroom soup
8 oz. sour cream
8 oz. milk
1 box Stove Top stuffing
Salt and pepper to taste
2C Minute Rice

Cut chicken into bite size pieces brown in 1 tablespoon butter. Prepare Stove Top as directed on box. Prepare rice as directed on box, set aside.  Mix together sour cream, mushroom soup, and milk. Mix chicken in with soup mixture. Place in rectangular casserole top with stuffing. Bake at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes. 
Top rice w/ this mixture.  The rice is optional but it really is good w/ the gravy/sauce that gets made

I really do love this stuff.


How ya doin Anubis ?. . This sounds like it'd work with a dutch oven. . that'd make some mighty fine eaten 

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Offline Anubis1335

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #126 on: January 17, 2013, 02:44:34 PM »



How ya doin Anubis ?. . This sounds like it'd work with a dutch oven. . that'd make some mighty fine eaten 


Doing well, thanks!  YOu?  I bet it would work pretty ez in the DO.  Give it a whirl and let us know please!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #127 on: January 17, 2013, 02:46:19 PM »
What doesn't work in a Dutch oven? 8)
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Offline Anubis1335

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #128 on: January 17, 2013, 02:47:17 PM »
What doesn't work in a Dutch oven? 8)

Ill take "Everything in the DO works and is better" for the win, Alex!
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Offline imnukensc

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #129 on: October 24, 2013, 03:44:37 PM »
Amish Country Breakfast
1 pound sliced bacon, diced
1 medium sweet onion, chopped
6 eggs, lightly beaten
4 cups frozen shredded hash brown potatoes, thawed
2 cups (8 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese
1-1/2 cups (12 ounces) 4% cottage cheese
1-1/4 cups shredded Swiss cheese
In a large skillet, cook bacon and onion until bacon is crisp; drain. In a large bowl, combine the remaining ingredients; stir in bacon mixture. Transfer to a greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking dish. Bake, uncovered, at 350? for 35-40 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Let stand for 10 minutes before cutting.
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #130 on: October 28, 2013, 06:44:01 PM »
Simple steak seasoning.

Found this recipe that supposedly mimics that of Long Horn Steak House's Prairie Dust. I've tried it a few times and must say that it is excellent.

1 tablespoon salt
1 1/4 teaspoon paprika
1 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander

Mix it all up - and sprinkle liberally.

Cooking tip for steak - get a good sear to seal in the juices. Normally I use a hot grill, but recently started using hot, hot, hot cast iron. Sear for a bout a minute per side - finish cooking - let rest - eat.

Offline imnukensc

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #131 on: October 28, 2013, 06:50:03 PM »
Sounds good, CD!  I'll try it soon.
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Offline wolfy

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MY MOM'S LEMON JELLO CAKE
« Reply #132 on: February 08, 2014, 06:26:50 PM »
This cake is most definitely WOLFY APPROVED!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


This is my favorite cake of all time! :drool:    We just had this last week for my "BIRTHDAY CAKE'' at my request. :banana:   It's very moist and tangy lemon cake and requires no frosting, as it kind of glazes itself.  :shrug:  It's not as good if you eat it the day that it's baked.  It requires 'aging' for at LEAST 24-36 hours to get juicy and flavorful......trus t me! :thumbsup:

Dissolve 1 small box lemon Jello in 1 cup boiling water. Cool. 8).   In a large mixing bowl, lightly beat 4 eggs.   Add 3/4 cup oil and cooled Jello.   To this mixture, add 1 box lemon cake mix.   Beat with electric mixer for about 2 minutes.   Pour into a 9"X13" cake pan.   Bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes.

While cake is baking, mix together 2 cups powdered sugar & 1/2 cup Real Lemon concentrate.

When cake is done and still hot, pierce all over the top at 1" intervals with a table fork.   Pour powdered sugar/lemon mix over the top of it.   This will soak in and form a light glaze. 

WAIT 24-36 HOURS!...........DAGNABIT!! >:(

Serve with ice cream, whipped topping or 'neat'..........like I think it's at it's best! :thumbsup:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #133 on: February 08, 2014, 06:28:54 PM »
Sounds good.  A man's kind of cake. :)
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Online Moe M.

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Re: MY MOM'S LEMON JELLO CAKE
« Reply #134 on: February 10, 2014, 06:29:45 AM »
This cake is most definitely WOLFY APPROVED!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


This is my favorite cake of all time! :drool:    We just had this last week for my "BIRTHDAY CAKE'' at my request. :banana:   It's very moist and tangy lemon cake and requires no frosting, as it kind of glazes itself.  :shrug:  It's not as good if you eat it the day that it's baked.  It requires 'aging' for at LEAST 24-36 hours to get juicy and flavorful......trus t me! :thumbsup:

Dissolve 1 small box lemon Jello in 1 cup boiling water. Cool. 8).   In a large mixing bowl, lightly beat 4 eggs.   Add 3/4 cup oil and cooled Jello.   To this mixture, add 1 box lemon cake mix.   Beat with electric mixer for about 2 minutes.   Pour into a 9"X13" cake pan.   Bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes.

While cake is baking, mix together 2 cups powdered sugar & 1/2 cup Real Lemon concentrate.

When cake is done and still hot, pierce all over the top at 1" intervals with a table fork.   Pour powdered sugar/lemon mix over the top of it.   This will soak in and form a light glaze. 

WAIT 24-36 HOURS!...........DAGNABIT!! >:(

Serve with ice cream, whipped topping or 'neat'..........like I think it's at it's best! :thumbsup:

   Sounds delish old pard,  but 3/4 cup of oil is going to catch up with you,  and you ain't getting any younger bud.
   Just for the haliibut, next time you make it try using 1/4 cup of oil and 1/2 cup of apple sauce instead of all that oil.

   Or not,  It's your birthday.        :shrug:
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #135 on: February 10, 2014, 06:41:17 AM »
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:
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Offline rtaylor129

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #136 on: February 10, 2014, 07:55:19 AM »
Rabbit Stew

Ingredients
1 whole rabbit cleaned and skinned
4 russet potatoes cubed
4 carrots cubed
2 large onions finely diced
2stalks celery
4 quarts of broth (I use veggie)
3 tbsp of flour
2 bay leaves
Salt and pepper to taste
1ounce of olive oil

In a stew pot place olive oil in bottom and heat up. Next spread the flour all over the rabbit. Next brown all sides of the rabbit. Add all the broth. Bring to boil and then reduce to simmer. Cook minimum 2 hours before adding veggies. Finally add veggies and cook til potatoes are fork tender. To thicken the stew add a slurry of flour and water until the desired thickness is achieved. Before serving remove the bay leaves.

That is my absolute favorite rabbit recipe
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #137 on: February 10, 2014, 05:09:29 PM »
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:

  OK,  it's your funeral.      :taunt: :rofl: :lol:
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Offline imnukensc

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #138 on: February 10, 2014, 05:18:22 PM »
At least around here when there's a funeral there's lots of food.  If they're serving this cake at wolfy's, I'm going!
And even if they're not, I'm gonna make it before then!  Sounds wonderful!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #139 on: February 10, 2014, 05:36:24 PM »
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:

  OK,  it's your funeral.      :taunt: :rofl: :lol:
You're invited, Moe......I've specified Mom's Lemon Jello Cake be served after the service. O:-)
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Online Moe M.

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #140 on: February 10, 2014, 06:00:35 PM »
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:

  OK,  it's your funeral.      :taunt: :rofl: :lol:
You're invited, Moe......I've specified Mom's Lemon Jello Cake be served after the service. O:-)

  Ok,  but I'll need directions.   ;)

   If it's all the same to you I'd much rather that I didn't get an invite,  if you get my drift,  just have a smaller piece and stick around for a while longer.
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Offline wolfy

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HUDSON BAY BREAD
« Reply #141 on: February 23, 2014, 05:36:38 PM »
Here's a high-energy 'bread' that's good for quick, filling and hunger-satisfying trail food.  Famous in the canoe country for years.....a couple of pieces w/peanut butter will keep you going all day long.   It's called Hudson Bay Bread or just Bay Bread.   A HECKUVALOT better than Pilot Bread!


                                                         HUDSON BAY BREAD

1-1/2 lbs. margarine or butter (Butter, always!)

4 cups of sugar (substitute raw, unrefined evaporated cane sugar)

2/3 cup dark Karo syrup or use maple syrup or blackstrap molasses.

2/3 cup honey

2 tsp. maple flavoring (If you use pure maple syrup, you don?t need this.)

Cream together the above ingredients.

Add while mixing:

1-1/2 cups of ground nuts (Almonds, walnuts or peanuts)

19 cups of oatmeal (use 'Old Fashioned' or the kind you have to cook. The less refined the grain, the more nutrition).

I usually add a little salt, too....everything needs a little salt to bring out the flavor.

Spread in a large sheet pan. Press it down into the pan. Bake at 325 degrees in a wind (or convection) oven for 15-18 minutes. As soon as the bread has been taken from the oven, use a spatula to press it down again. This presses the bread together to keep it from crumbling.

Cut it while still warm. For home-size preparation, cut this recipe at least in half. A conventional oven requires a longer baking time.
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Offline imnukensc

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #142 on: February 23, 2014, 05:40:39 PM »
Saw that recipe in that other thread, wolfy.  That looks good!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #143 on: February 23, 2014, 05:43:15 PM »
Saw that recipe in that other thread, wolfy.  That looks good!
I thought it would be easier to find in a 'search' here in Just Recipes, rather than buried in a thread on dry staples. :P
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Offline bdavison

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #144 on: February 23, 2014, 07:59:08 PM »
My recipe

Catch trout.
Fillet trout, and cut into 1/4" x 1" strips
Put trout in brine (salt, water, brown sugar) for 15 min
Dig hole 5" deep and 1ft around.
Build stick tepee over hole.
Make rack inside to hang trout.
Cover tepee with tarp.
Hang brined trout on rack.
Take hot coals from your campfire and put in the hole you dug.
Put debarked slightly green hardwood over coals so that it smokes
Maintain smoking over wood for 2-3 hours at around 160-200F
Take trout out of tepee
Lay it on a tortilla with some cream cheese
Eat it.
Repeat as necessary.

Edit:
Have gun nearby to ward off hungry neighbors and bears.

« Last Edit: February 23, 2014, 08:06:08 PM by bdavison »

Offline imnukensc

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #145 on: February 26, 2014, 09:51:56 AM »
Potato, Cheddar, Bacon Soup

6 strips of thick cut bacon
3 TBS butter
1 large onion, diced
1 large carrot, diced
1 clove garlic, minced (I just use about a heaping tsp of the stuff from a jar)
1/4 cup AP flour
6 cups chicken broth
3 large russet potatoes cut into cubes
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 cups grated sharp cheddar cheese (about 8 ounces)
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Salt to taste
Chopped fresh chives (if ya gottem)
Fry bacon in a 4 quart pot (I use a 6 quart or 8 quart) until crisp.  Remove bacon and pour off all but about a TBS of drippings.  Add butter to pan and cook and stir until melted.
Add onion and carrots and cook until tender about 5 minutes or so.  Add flour and cook and stir for a couple of minutes to make a roux.  Gradually stir in broth.
Add potatoes and heat to a boil.  Reduce heat to low and cook for 15 minutes or until potatoes are tender and mixture is thickened.
Stir in cheese and cream and cook until cheese is melted.  Season with black pepper and salt to your liking.  Crumble bacon and garnish soup with bacon and chives.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #146 on: February 26, 2014, 09:57:26 AM »
The measurements for the cream & flour came through as "??", Nuke.....might want to edit before you can't.   Sounds like a really good chowder recipe.....THANKS! :)

EDIT:  looks like you caught it......I guessed right on the cream, but would have added 1/4 cup more flour if I'd have dumped it in all at once. 8)
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Offline imnukensc

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #147 on: February 26, 2014, 09:59:41 AM »
Yeah, I fixed it, wolfy.

I tried adding some sort of seafood to it once.  Don't remember now if it was shrimp, oysters, clams, or fish.  If I'd left out the cheddar cheese in the original recipe, I think it would've been fine.  It just didn't taste right and I'm almost positive it was the cheese that made it taste off.  'Course, I've since learned from the Food Channel that seafood and cheese don't pair well.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 10:04:49 AM by imnukensc »
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Offline Yellowyak

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #148 on: February 28, 2014, 02:57:07 PM »
Beer Cheese Recipe

This was always a staple in our house when growing up in Kentucky. I've copied this in from my wife's web site (http://www.timeforfamily.com/Recipes/ryans_beer_cheese.html). Excellent on saltines.

My husband is from Lexington, Kentucky and he has fond memories of beer cheese. His favorite brand is Hall's. We have experimented and tried many recipes until we came up with this version. My son Ryan has mastered making this recipe and he is the family beer cheese expert.

Ingredients:

16 oz sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
8 oz beer, flattened and room temperature
3 oz cream cheese
4 medium sized garlic cloves, very finely minced
3 tbs worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp dry mustard
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp cream styled horseradish sauce (optional)
Directions:

Except for cheese, place all ingredients in a blender. Blend on high. You can also do this in a food processor.
Very gradually add shredded cheese to the blender.
Continue to blend until the mixture is very creamy. We blend this for at least 10 minutes. This is what we believe is the trick in getting the smoothest consistency and the best at incorporating the flavors.
Chill for at least 4 hours or overnight. The longer it sits the better.
Serve at room temperature with Saltine crackers or pretzels.
Comments:

- If the garlic are large, use only 3 cloves.

- Don't even try to use prepackaged shredded cheese. Take the time to grate/shred the cheese yourself. It is worth it.

- I prefer to make this at least the day before serving. This allows the flavors to develop and meld together.

- We have omitted the horseradish when we don't have it on hand and it is still very good.

Tips:

- To flatten the beer, pour it out quickly into a large glass or container and allow the foam to settle completely.

Variations:

- None

Offline wolfy

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Re: Just Recipes
« Reply #149 on: February 28, 2014, 03:41:59 PM »
That sounds GREAT! :drool:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX