Author Topic: Vintage knives  (Read 6915 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Vintage knives
« on: January 26, 2014, 08:21:04 AM »

  I just got through posting in the Chasing the perfect knife thread,  I replied to a post made by Wolfy about one of his most wanted knives and it got me thinking about some of the more memorable knives from my past as a youth,  one was my first knife given to me by my Father, I was about 5 or 6 years old at the time and we were on a family vacation on Sebego Lake in Maine,  it was a CampKing scout type folder,  and even though it was an inexpensive knife it was a good one.
  Another was my first fixed blade,  also a gift from my Dad,  it was a hunting styled knife common to the first half of the 1900's,  it had about a 5" clip point blade, fairly wide, it was made of carbon steel but I remember that it was plated ( Hard chromed I think) to reduce the chances of rust I guess.
  The handle was one piece with a molded guard and pommel,  it was checkered and made of some kind of plastic or Bakelite material,  the knife was marketed by Remington,  but I don't know who made it, Remington had quit making knives just before WW-2.
  There were more knives in my life as my love for the outdoors evolved,  but enough of mine, how about hearing about some of yours.
   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 08:40:57 AM »
I remember my first knife, a BSA folder, and the school Principal who took it away from me.  :(  The knife I remember most from my teenage years is the Navy service knife my dad used in WWII.  It was a PAL RH-36 model in a leather sheath.  It was big compared to today's tastes but it had those blood grooves and a stacked leather handle.  I still have it but its been modified to fit my need for a rendezvous era knife in my mountain man days.  Awhile back I got a brand new condition one from a seller who said his Uncle carried it in Europe during WWII and never took it out of the sheath. 
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Offline zammer

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 11:38:11 AM »
You know what would make this trip down memory lane really cool?      PICS     there out there boys, just gotta do a little sleuthing   :cheers:
"big fish like to live in bad places, that's how they get to be big fish"

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2014, 12:37:11 PM »
Here is the vintage PAL CH-36 issued in WWII.

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Offline zammer

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2014, 12:47:43 PM »
That's more like it  :cheers:  thanks Stan
"big fish like to live in bad places, that's how they get to be big fish"

Offline wolfy

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2014, 12:59:05 PM »
Very nice! :thumbsup:   I'd much rather have one of them than a K-Bar!
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Offline BigHat

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2014, 01:18:35 PM »
my favorite type of knife, by far

the scout folder

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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2014, 01:24:26 PM »
In the old days there were lots of folding knives with a good awl on them.  Pretty hard to find one these days, at least in my searching about.  I finally bought an old Scout Knife made by Ulster that has one.  Darn handy thing, an awl.   :)
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2014, 02:21:47 PM »
Very nice! :thumbsup:   I'd much rather have one of them than a K-Bar!

  I have one of them,  in almost as good a shape as that one,  but mine was issued in a fiberglass sheath marked Navy Mark 2.
  I had it for years in my junk drawer, I had stripped off the leather washers meaning to re-handle the knife,  when I uncovered it again I decided to just replace some of the damaged washers and bring it back to original,  it did and it came out great,  all that time I thought it was a K-Bar.
  While working on the handle I noticed the PAL-36 on the blade,  so I researched it and found that it was actually a Remington design,  Remington made and sold them as the Remington Hunter,  PAL bought out Remington's Knife division in about 1938,  they discontinued the fixed blade knives and produced folding knives,  half of their production business was making Boy Scout knives for the BSA.
  When I looked like we were going to get involved in WW-2 the military asked for designs and bids for a new military combat knife,  the specs. were for a 6" and 7" blade,  stacked leather handle, a cross guard,  and a rounded pommel,  PAL, having some finished Remington Hunter knives and some blade blanks,  all the tooling from their purchase of Remington, Pal submitted some of the Hunters for the trials,  they were the first to submit a knife,  their design was accepted and the Remington Hunter became the standard US Military fighting knife,  the 6" version was issued to the Navy, the 7" model went to the Marines and the Army.
  PAL couldn't supply all the knives that the military called for so Ka-Bar and other makers joined in the effort,  Ka-Bar became the leading manufacturer and the knife eventually became known as the Marine Ka-Bar.

  And now you know the rest of the story.
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Offline zammer

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2014, 02:28:35 PM »
That's interesting Moe, I was wondering why it resembled the Ka-Bar
"big fish like to live in bad places, that's how they get to be big fish"

Offline wolfy

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2014, 02:31:18 PM »
Thank you, Moekipedia! :hail:
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Offline Sarge

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2014, 02:59:07 PM »
Thank you, Moekipedia! :hail:

Now that's funny right there...

but seriously, Moe, cool knife and interesting bit of history.
"In the school of the woods, there is no graduation day."  Horace Kephart (1862-1931)

Offline ncnurseryman

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2014, 03:45:30 PM »
Ive always liked the Buck 110 folders.   The first one I bought back in early 80's went with me to Germany during the Army.  It was confiscated by some yellow bar officers during an inspection sweep.  When I was due to ship out I asked for that knife back.  At first they played dumb but I found it stashed in a box full of confiscated items.  I used that knife for many things including field dressing many a deer.  I finally lost it a couple of years ago field dressing a small buck.  I remember field dressing the deer but that's where I can't recall what I did with it.   I looked and looked, even went back with a metal detector to try and find it to no avail.  I think maybe it fell off the tailgate and landed who knows where.  I had that knife for over 20 years.   I have since bought another one but I hated to lose the first one. 

Offline wolfy

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2014, 03:50:12 PM »
Here's some pictures of Dad's old laminated steel hunting knife that he bought to go deer hunting in the Black Hills of South Dakota back in 1954.  It cost the grand sum of $4.95 at that time, but one in way worse shape recently sold on eBay for a LOT more than that. :shrug:   I field dressed my first buck with this knife when I was 16 years old.  These are the first knives that old Harry Morseth put together from blades he obtained in Norway......you can still see his stamp on the choil. 8)







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Offline ncnurseryman

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2014, 04:28:35 PM »
That's nice that you still have that.  an heirloom for sure.

Offline Sarge

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2014, 04:50:42 PM »
Nice one, wolfy!
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Offline wolfy

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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2014, 06:27:15 PM »
We talked about that one didn't we?  Yours is really in great shape.  It went for a lot more than I thought it would given the condition in was in.  That steel is really good from what I know and it holds a great edge.  Thanks for posting a photo of yours.
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Offline Woods_Jack

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2014, 12:15:16 AM »
I think the oldest I got is my Anton Wingen/Solingen. Had it like something close to 40 years now:



Some time back, I picked up this ol' Frost Mora with laminated blade, but don't know it's age:


Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2014, 12:56:28 AM »
This was my Dad's salmon fishing knife for as long as I can remember. It's a Western.  Marked "Boulder CO USA"  It sits on my desk as a letter opener now, just to stay active, but it could go into the field any time it wanted.




I picked his Old Timer up at a rummage sale a while back. I reminded me of Dad's, too. Not sure where his got packed away for safe keeping.


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Offline hunter63

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2014, 08:43:05 AM »
Thanks for the walk down memory lane.

One of the heirloom left overs was an Remington 4/12.....no sheath and those black plastic scale, were broken and mostly missing.

Need to take a better Pic, but has Remington on one side, and RH 48 on the other .....currently wears paracord as scales......Top in pic  .....along with a couple of other oldies.....

 
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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2014, 08:40:05 PM »
Here's some pictures of Dad's old laminated steel hunting knife that he bought to go deer hunting in the Black Hills of South Dakota back in 1954.  It cost the grand sum of $4.95 at that time, but one in way worse shape recently sold on eBay for a LOT more than that. :shrug:   I field dressed my first buck with this knife when I was 16 years old.  These are the first knives that old Harry Morseth put together from blades he obtained in Norway......you can still see his stamp on the choil. 8)









Wow, wolfy, I didn't think I was going to live long enough to see this one!  Just goes to prove that absolutely anything is possible in the multiverse.  Sweet knife, thanks for sharing.

Offline Bearhunter

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Re: Vintage knives
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2014, 08:48:31 PM »
My first 'real' knife that I can remember was an old Barlow. Then an old Kissing Crane 'trapper' . My first real fixed blade... besides my Rambo :P was an old American made 'old timer'... I skinned a lot of critters with that knife! I lost it in Colorado :(

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