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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by Moe M. on October 21, 2018, 08:04:08 AM »
I guess I don't understand why one would use parchment paper when baking bread? :shrug:   When we finish baking a loaf of free-form sourdough bread or a batch of biscuits in a bake kettle  8) there's never anything left in it to indicate anything had been baked in it at all.....other than a crumb or two, maybe. :coffee:    I don't recall Wishbone ever using it on the trail drives. :lol:

  It's a Dutch Oven,  it used to be a bake kettle, now it's a Dutch Oven.  (don't be a trouble maker)

  Wishbone never baked a loaf of bread or worked a trail drive.  (he was a cute bearded comic character on a TV show)

  I use it because it negates any clean up, and it helps to lift a hot loaf of bread out of an even hotter cast iron pot without burning your fingers.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wsdstan on October 21, 2018, 07:39:48 AM »
 :cheers: :cheers: , yep it is good stuff.   You can write on it too.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by madmax on October 21, 2018, 06:16:36 AM »
Stan, cobblers are exactly why I use parchment paper.  That and casseroles.  The cleanup isn't that hard even without the paper, but it's so easy to use why not?  My banana bread/cobbler turned out very wet and I'm glad I used paper with that.  I'm going to try bread in my #6 in preparation for solo at the 'vous.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wsdstan on October 20, 2018, 06:52:16 PM »
I used it because the Southern Living recipe said to use it.  It does, in the case of cookies, pies, and other things that leak, or have oil in them make cleanup easy when using aluminum pans or steel cookie sheets.  Not so much with biscuits but I tend to follow instructions most of the time.

It isn't really useful in cast iron except you could, I think, make a peach cobbler in your DO without it being baked on when your done.  Of course that is just in case your seasoning has worn thin in a couple of places.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wolfy on October 20, 2018, 05:44:18 PM »
I guess I don't understand why one would use parchment paper when baking bread? :shrug:   When we finish baking a loaf of free-form sourdough bread or a batch of biscuits in a bake kettle  8) there's never anything left in it to indicate anything had been baked in it at all.....other than a crumb or two, maybe. :coffee:    I don't recall Wishbone ever using it on the trail drives. :lol:
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by wsdstan on October 20, 2018, 10:33:16 AM »
The biscuits I made @ 475 F did brown the edges of the parchment a bit Moe. 
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by Moe M. on October 20, 2018, 09:31:48 AM »

  I use parchment paper a lot when cooking or baking, mostly for biscuits and pizza,  most parchment paper manufacturers have a printed warning (suggestion) that parchment paper should not be used at temps over 420* F., I have been baking my biscuits, breads, cakes and pizza at 425* without any problems, however, I have pushed the temps to 450* for pizza and have gotten some browning of the paper,  I once cranked the oven to 500 for pizza and the paper under the pizza was showing signs of browning (burning), the pizza did taste a bit different, and the edges of the paper not covered by the pizza fell apart when touched like burnt paper.
 I use parchment paper when baking my no knead bread in a covered Dutch Oven at 450* and the paper shows signs of browning, I'm assuming because it's at it's limit of operating temps.
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Country and Rural Living Skills / Re: Project Oasis, New pond???
« Last post by JeffG on October 19, 2018, 09:35:26 PM »
I priced out the 13 mil I will need at $1400. Not bad for a D.I.Y. It would cost way more to have it done. I wonder if 2 mil would last?

Look into rubber roofing. Find a roofing company that tears off old roofs, you might find it cheap. I used it for my little garden koi pond in 2004. The edges that aren't covered by rocks or vegetation show no signs of sun or weather fatigue. If you are going to stick with plastic, make sure you use silo cap, which is more UV resistant. 5 or 6 mil is what you want. Might be less expensive here.
https://farmplasticsupply.com/60x100bc6?gclid=CjwKCAjwgabeBRBuEiwACD4R5pBevipIsnUjR7wc1mVRcbzIrvXQpJ-IIcyZZZSGNDYS2Lw_hyIA8xoClCMQAvD_BwE

We live in Wisconsin, the koi winter in the pond. The pond is 11x17 -4 feet deep.  I use a small fountain pump to keep an "otter hole " to let gasses escape. My back up is a stock tank heater if it falls -10 below zero, but I only plug it in when I need it. Pond guy.com has aeration options that would work better for you.



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Country and Rural Living Skills / Re: Project Oasis, New pond???
« Last post by xj35s on October 19, 2018, 07:14:22 PM »
No. The more expensive lake liner. I think it's 17 mil. That's why this is going to be much smaller than I wanted it originally.
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Food and Cooking / Re: Tuning up the Dutch Oven Recipies
« Last post by Mannlicher on October 19, 2018, 11:28:14 AM »
I don't think I have cooked anything in a Dutch Oven in a year.  Darn.
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