Author Topic: We've got some dedicated navigators here...  (Read 215 times)

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Offline buzzacott

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We've got some dedicated navigators here...
« on: September 23, 2017, 04:05:42 AM »
I'm one too :-D

Show us your favourite compasses and land navigation gear!

Here's one of mine.


Oxide brass hunter-cased pocket compass with a Royal Geographical Society patent dial made in England circa 1870s. I use it as part of my swag walking kit when I don't need o bring a full prismatic marching compass.
Don't kill unless for the pot. Don't fell a green tree for a pole if there are dry poles nearby. Study the bush, learn to read its secrets; watch the mason fly building and go to the ant for another lesson... then you'll realise the bush is your friend.
Richard Graves - 1944

Offline woodsorrel

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Re: We've got some dedicated navigators here...
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2017, 03:14:48 PM »
Hi buzzacott,

Here's a shot of my compass from a navigation article I wrote a while back.



Here's the article, if you're interested, buzzacott:

http://www.natureoutside.com/put-red-fred-in-the-shed/

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline buzzacott

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Re: We've got some dedicated navigators here...
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2017, 04:40:54 PM »
@woodsorrel

Great article mate, and a good lookin' compass too!

That compass looks like a Suunto MC2G, which is my modern compass of choice also -  Great minds think alike ;-) The MC2G supposedly works anywhere in the world without too much of a needle "dip".

That ability to dial in the declination is super convenient and something which has been missing from compasses until the Suunto came along I reckon. The mirror sighting is very accurate compared to a basic baseplate compass without such a lid, and the mirror itself can be pressed into service as a heliograph/signal mirror in an emergency or as a general purpose camp mirror. I've shaved using mine.

If you use degrees instead of mils for your land nav it's a compass I'll recommend. I'm not sure if they make a military model in mils or not. I tend to do a lot of land nav using old timey compasses graduated in degrees, so I can use either system. Don't ask me to use the Soviet/Arab 60000 mils system though or I'll be flummoxed hahaha

Here's another of my faves

It's a British-made 1870s-1890s prismatic military marching compass. Still dead accurate.


Shown here with the lid off and sitting on my leather map case


A bit of detail showing the funny green dial and the fold-up sighting vane.


Size of the compass (right) when compared with a later 1910s era Verner's Pattern prismatic marching compass which developed from it.
Don't kill unless for the pot. Don't fell a green tree for a pole if there are dry poles nearby. Study the bush, learn to read its secrets; watch the mason fly building and go to the ant for another lesson... then you'll realise the bush is your friend.
Richard Graves - 1944

Offline woodsorrel

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Re: We've got some dedicated navigators here...
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2017, 07:50:20 PM »
Wow!  You have quite a collection, buzzacott:)

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om