Author Topic: UST "Paratinder"  (Read 753 times)

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Offline PetrifiedWood

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UST "Paratinder"
« on: December 21, 2017, 10:31:40 PM »
I saw a new (to me, anyway) product at Walmart a couple of days ago and it caught my attention. I have been making some paracord bracelets with my daughter and was in the camping section at walmaart and saw some orange paracord hanging up next to other stuff from UST like their fire starters.

But upon closer inspection, it's actually more than just paracord. It has the usual seven strands of twisted nylon inside, and also a strand of what appears to be waxed cotton twine or something similar. The premise is that you use the stuff like you would any other kind of paracord, but if you need an emergency source of tinder, you can strip the strands from the inside and separate out the red tinder strand and light it with a ferro rod or other means.

I made a bracelet with it using some regular black 550 cord and one of the popular plastic buckles that has an integral ferro rod, striker, and whistle. The extra strand makes this cord a little thicker than regular 550 cord but not by too much. It also is slightly less supple. I imagine if the tinder strand does contain wax, that it could migrate over into other strands in a hot environment. But when fusing the ends of it with a lighter, it didn't seem to wick into the nylon strands, so maybe not.  I haven't tried lighting any of the tinder yet (other than fusing the ends) but I figured I'd save that for a proper gear review. The nylon strands, oddly enough, melt back away from the tinder strand which burns much like a lit candle.

Has anyone else used the stuff?


Offline Keith H

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Re: UST "Paratinder"
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2017, 01:45:36 AM »
No I have not tried it & I would not bother trying it. Modern gadgets have taken away most people's ability to perform primitive skills. I know what real tinder is, & this is not it. I know what real cordage is & I can make it from plant fibres. I don't need gadgets, no real woodsman does.

Sorry if this comes across as negative, but in my opinion there are just too many gadgets on the market & they are only there to make pilgrims spend more more on needless gear. Do yourself a favour, learn some primitive skills & get yourself some sustainable equipment.
Keith.
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less travelled by, and that has made all the difference. Frost.

Offline crashdive123

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Re: UST "Paratinder"
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2017, 04:33:18 AM »
Kind of harsh, but to each their own I suppose.

I have seen it, but have not tried it.  May have to now, especially after the admonition not to.

Offline Unknown

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Re: UST "Paratinder"
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2017, 11:01:15 AM »
No I have not tried it & I would not bother trying it. Modern gadgets have taken away most people's ability to perform primitive skills. I know what real tinder is, & this is not it. I know what real cordage is & I can make it from plant fibres. I don't need gadgets, no real woodsman does.

Sorry if this comes across as negative, but in my opinion there are just too many gadgets on the market & they are only there to make pilgrims spend more more on needless gear. Do yourself a favour, learn some primitive skills & get yourself some sustainable equipment.
Keith.

Hi Keith. I've learned from your videos and admire the determination it takes to do things the way you do.

I also admire innovation, invention, inventiveness, and sometimes I even like technology. In what ways do you see this cordage and bracelet combo that PW came up with not to be in the same lineage as the metallic tinder box, and tinder tube?

It's not possible that every invention, innovation, re-purposing, or gadget be novel or truly useful. One has to evaluate, experiment, etc. to see how such fits one's own purpose, intentions, style. I think most could agree to that. If you look critically at your own kit, couldn't you find some items that would fit into the definition of "gadget". I really don't have much opinion about the combo PW came up with for my own use. I do think the buckle is kinda nifty. I just don't want one. (Right now)

I often like to know how people define words for themselves. Primitive is one of them. It is such a relative term, I just don't like or use it myself. So when you say, "primitive skills" what does that mean to you? And a little bit further, why should one aspire to be more primitive. Could you imagine an 18th c. gent purposefully seeking out a more primitive gun, to satisfy whatever it is that primitivism seeks to discover? To me that does not mean that some old methods should not be undertaken to be learned, appreciated, understood.

There are a number of things I enjoy (or have enjoyed) doing that are simple, a wooden bow is very simple. I don't want it to be "primitive"; but as good as I can make it, drawing upon as much information, accurate sources, and understanding as experience allows. It's called primitive archery today, because its adherents felt they needed distinction from merely Traditional tackle using "modern" composite technology.

We need purists, we need innovation too. When we find something that works- it might be somewhat different- but if it encapsulates the same spirit as an older way, then I'd say it is a good thing. We can work at all the primitive or traditional skills we want, but loose the mindset, belief system in which those things were practiced all you have is anachronism. Sorry to rant and ramble. The questions are not meant to be rhetorical, since I'd like to get a deeper insight into primitive and sustainable tackle, not so much the, what is it; but why do it.

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Offline wolfy

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Re: UST "Paratinder"
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2017, 11:12:14 AM »
Excellent post, Unk.....I do believe you hit the nail squarely on the head. :coffee:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: UST "Paratinder"
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2017, 11:54:04 AM »
Yeah, my primitive fire skills could definitely use some brushing up. In my limited experience in my area, natural tinder is everywhere, but sometimes more or less suitable for blowing an ember into flames. The cedar bark in Texas is WAY better than the juniper bark here in Utah, for example. I like to carry multiple means of fire ignition and tinder just to keep my options open because nature is nothing if not unpredictable. I try things like bow drills and flint and steel first because I like to experience them. But I try not to rely on them in case conditions and circumstances make those methods difficult or impossible.

Offline hayshaker

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Re: UST "Paratinder"
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2017, 05:09:49 AM »
fat wood, and thats a reall nice bracelet thanks for posting.

Offline greyhound352

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Re: UST "Paratinder"
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2017, 06:42:25 AM »
I purchased the same package a couple of months ago to test and planned on doing the same thing you did with the ferro rod buckles. If the product works well I would wear the bracket to have with me while outdoors. Here in Florida we do a lot of water related camping and if gear was lost do to an overturned vessel and rain was in the forecast, I would like to better my chances for fire.
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