Author Topic: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit  (Read 10351 times)

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Offline comis

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No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« on: July 27, 2014, 09:16:10 AM »
Hi, everyone.

This is a video I made for my no budget 72 hours outdoor survival kit, and I'd like to seek your advice on how best to improve and what else you would use instead.  I am not a survival/outdoor expert, and no where near the skill levels of many experience outdoorsmen here, but that's more a reason I think it is important to construct a kit like this.

I call this a 'no budget' kit, because I always think of outdoor safety as a holistic approach(good planning/collective skill set/inform friend/family...etc), and should I ever have to resort to using this kit, I'd like to know I have tried my best to include all the best gears I know(and to use)and afford in the kit.  Most of the items I have used/tested(even the meds) and am confident they will performed the way they should.  I guess the more controversial piece of gear will probably be the experimental 3mW green laser point with pattern diffuser.  I have no intention to point it to anyone/any plane, but it does project a fairly bright green pattern 20-50 feet away and mostly, I consider that a spare battery carrier for my flashlight.

The tin I use is a small postcard tin.  I tried many different sizes in the past, altoids or candy tins, but honestly, I really can't quite fit all the gears I want in a small size kit as Altoids.  I only feel comfortable when this small postcard tin can fit what I felt is absolutely bare minimum for myself.  And this kit is attached to me on person, mostly intended for very short hike.  As for longer camping/outdoor trip, I do have a much larger kit for insurance.

Without further ado, I thank you in advance for watching, and please feel free to let me know what you think  :)


Offline Aven

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2014, 10:00:34 AM »
That is a very well thought out kit Comis.  Thanks for sharing with us.
Seriously people, stop expecting normal from me.... We all know it's never gonna happen.

Offline upthecreek

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2014, 10:43:46 AM »
I like it. You have a bunch of good stuff in a nicely constructed small package. Very well thought out in my opinion. Others could probably use this a guide to build their own. Good post

Creek
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Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2014, 11:03:02 AM »
Aven and Upthecreek,

Thank you for watching, I tried my best.  :)

I often time think about the limits and the tradeoff I made for a small size kit as such.  Though I do carry a larger kit when I am staying overnight or a longer trip, it is always humbling to watch Mors Kochanski's kit when I am building my own.  Here is a man with very extensive outdoor survival knowledge, yet his kit is a size of a large pot:




He has an awfully interesting way to carry a saw blade, and it is certainly a skill/tip I'd love to learn and pick up.

Offline Aven

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2014, 11:48:00 AM »
LOL!  He did get that jacket in there.  That's a great video.

I've heard of saws being carried in belts, but I haven't found anyone who makes them.  I just finished a belt for my Sweetie and I was happy with the way it turned out.  I think I'm going to have to put a saw belt on my project list. 
Seriously people, stop expecting normal from me.... We all know it's never gonna happen.

Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2014, 09:29:47 PM »
LOL!  He did get that jacket in there.  That's a great video.

I've heard of saws being carried in belts, but I haven't found anyone who makes them.  I just finished a belt for my Sweetie and I was happy with the way it turned out.  I think I'm going to have to put a saw belt on my project list.

Yes, it does look like a magician preparing for show, ain't it?  :)

That'd be cool if you could make it, and definitely put a link here and I would love to see it.  I also wonder the possibility of having a paracord belt which can also carry a saw blade, that would be killing two birds in one stone.

Offline Aven

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2014, 09:56:45 PM »
If I get around to soon, I'll be happy to post a link to it here.  Soon is relative.  They say the memory is the first to go.
Seriously people, stop expecting normal from me.... We all know it's never gonna happen.

Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2014, 09:59:52 PM »
Wow, nicely organized kit and good review! :thumbsup:

In fact, you are much better organized than I am with my kit, and that kind of makes we want to get my kit a little better organized and thought through. So thanks for the very good review!


KK
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2014, 11:49:04 PM »
I totally agree about the altoids tin kits. Too small to be much use.

Offline Sarge

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2014, 08:38:43 AM »
Good video, comis. I like your kit & contents selection. Thanks for sharing.

I don't want to hijack your post but I think another good alternative to the Altoids tin is a Coghlan's Pack II first aid kit container. I've used the same one for maybe 20 years in some capacity as a first aid kit and/or PSK. It is a bit larger than the Altoids tin, it is durable, length is adjustable, etc. Oh, wait, I have it with me...

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Offline xj35s

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2014, 09:10:01 AM »
For some reason it "clicked" with me that I should have some form of purification tabs. I just always assume I'll boil. I had something against them for some unknown reason.

I have a pen in my swiss that's always in my pocket. I love this knife.

I can tell u that write in the rain stuff is amazing. I had a small pad in my cooler where I keep some parts, so I can jot down ideas. the stuff has gotten totally soaked a few times and is still very usable. I picked it up at tractor supply company.

Thanks for the look through. great kit.
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Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2014, 09:18:51 AM »
If I get around to soon, I'll be happy to post a link to it here.  Soon is relative.  They say the memory is the first to go.

No hurry, that reminds me of a Professor whom used to say, 'here, Time has time for itself...'  :D



Wow, nicely organized kit and good review! :thumbsup:

In fact, you are much better organized than I am with my kit, and that kind of makes we want to get my kit a little better organized and thought through. So thanks for the very good review!


KK

Thank you for the kind words, I tried my best and just hoped the video wasn't too long or boring to watch.



I totally agree about the altoids tin kits. Too small to be much use.

I really do think so. 

And as easy as they can be found, I know I for one has lead myself into believing that 'altoids' tin is most ideal for making 'survival kit' for the longest time.  Not to discredit any altoids tin users, any preparation is certainly better than none but as much as I like Altoids tin, I never just felt comfortable enough with the small choice of gears and priorities that I haven't addressed.  Maybe someone with massive outdoorsman skill can pull it off, but not me for foreseeable future.  :)

Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2014, 09:33:20 AM »
Good video, comis. I like your kit & contents selection. Thanks for sharing.

I don't want to hijack your post but I think another good alternative to the Altoids tin is a Coghlan's Pack II first aid kit container. I've used the same one for maybe 20 years in some capacity as a first aid kit and/or PSK. It is a bit larger than the Altoids tin, it is durable, length is adjustable, etc. Oh, wait, I have it with me...


Not at all!  I am always seeking ways to improve my kit, and this is something I have never seen in the past.  I like how this is contoured to fit in a pants pocket.  I gonna look it up!  Thank you! :)


For some reason it "clicked" with me that I should have some form of purification tabs. I just always assume I'll boil. I had something against them for some unknown reason.

I have a pen in my swiss that's always in my pocket. I love this knife.

I can tell u that write in the rain stuff is amazing. I had a small pad in my cooler where I keep some parts, so I can jot down ideas. the stuff has gotten totally soaked a few times and is still very usable. I picked it up at tractor supply company.

Thanks for the look through. great kit.

There's no question boiling water is probably the best way to kill germs, but not knowing whether I could find fuel when I am in a survival situation, I put in the purification tabs just in case I can't start a fire and it also allow me some freedom and time to address different survival priorities.

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2014, 12:08:42 AM »
I totally agree about the altoids tin kits. Too small to be much use.

Quote

I really do think so. 

And as easy as they can be found, I know I for one has lead myself into believing that 'altoids' tin is most ideal for making 'survival kit' for the longest time.  Not to discredit any altoids tin users, any preparation is certainly better than none but as much as I like Altoids tin, I never just felt comfortable enough with the small choice of gears and priorities that I haven't addressed.  Maybe someone with massive outdoorsman skill can pull it off, but not me for foreseeable future.  :)


I like the containers and I mostly use them for little fire kits, which I think they are well suited for. They are good for making charcloth, etc. And there is room for tinder and several redundant means of making fire.

I also think they make good containers for little fishing kits and small simple first aid kits. A few Band-Aids, some aspirin, purification tabs, antacid, alcohol wipes, that sort of thing.

But you aren't going to be able to fit a meaningful shelter in one.

My problem is I start out with a small, light, portable kit. Then over time I swap out some tiny less than optimum item for its full size counterpart. Then some other item gets added, like a real cup instead of a plastic bag. Pretty soon I need a bigger container. Then when I'm finally satisfied with all my items, I'm staring down at a fully stuffed day pack that started out as a small pouch of survival items. :D

Offline Sarge

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2014, 05:49:35 AM »
I know whatcha mean, PW. That little Coghlan's box in the pic was a first aid kit, then became a stand alone PSK, now it fits in one of six pockets in a larger nylon bag.
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Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2014, 10:22:50 AM »
A quick correction on the video:

I have much thank you to say for a viewer whom has reminded me that, the Aqua Mira water purification tab is made of 'Chlorine dioxide', but not what I said on video as 'sodium chloride'(which is salt).  I have made a 'bubble' on the video to make correction.  Pardon me for the slip of tongue.




I like the containers and I mostly use them for little fire kits, which I think they are well suited for. They are good for making charcloth, etc. And there is room for tinder and several redundant means of making fire.

I also think they make good containers for little fishing kits and small simple first aid kits. A few Band-Aids, some aspirin, purification tabs, antacid, alcohol wipes, that sort of thing.

But you aren't going to be able to fit a meaningful shelter in one.

My problem is I start out with a small, light, portable kit. Then over time I swap out some tiny less than optimum item for its full size counterpart. Then some other item gets added, like a real cup instead of a plastic bag. Pretty soon I need a bigger container. Then when I'm finally satisfied with all my items, I'm staring down at a fully stuffed day pack that started out as a small pouch of survival items. :D

I think you hit a homerun when talking about not able to fit a meaningful shelter in a small psk.  I felt that's the real drawback on any small survival kit, and eventually I just accept the fact that I will have to carry something along with the kit to address that.  I have the same dilemma when constructing the large kit, where I just want to fit everything I use for outdoor/camping into that mess kit.  Hope I could make another video sometime about the large kit and share the laugh with everyone.  :D

Offline wolfy

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2014, 10:46:37 AM »
The things are just perfect for storing your supply of Altoids in and they're just too neat to throw in the trash can when they're empty!  I've got a lifetime supply of them stored in the junk drawer in the kitchen. :shrug:
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Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2014, 12:37:08 PM »
The things are just perfect for storing your supply of Altoids in and they're just too neat to throw in the trash can when they're empty!  I've got a lifetime supply of them stored in the junk drawer in the kitchen. :shrug:

Haha...  :shrug: <-- that was the same expression of my wife everytime she sees my survival/camping/bushcraft/anything outdoor/emptied tins...I am not a 'neat freak' by any means, but I do have to travel often for work, and having different sizes of tins and bags really help to organize and module(is that even a verb?) my belongings.

Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2014, 05:43:33 PM »
The things are just perfect for storing your supply of Altoids in and they're just too neat to throw in the trash can when they're empty!  I've got a lifetime supply of them stored in the junk drawer in the kitchen. :shrug:

Haha...  :shrug: <-- that was the same expression of my wife everytime she sees my survival/camping/bushcraft/anything outdoor/emptied tins...I am not a 'neat freak' by any means, but I do have to travel often for work, and having different sizes of tins and bags really help to organize and module(is that even a verb?) my belongings.
lol! I don't think 'module' is a verb, but I do think you should make it one! :) (We like making up words around here!) :)

Al lot of folks could say their spouses give them a :shrug: once in a while! :)
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Offline wolfy

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2014, 07:29:08 PM »
Let's go with "MODULIZE" & see how that works. :shrug:
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Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2014, 09:42:12 PM »
Let's go with "MODULIZE" & see how that works. :shrug:
And one who modulizes would be a "modulator." 

Marvin the Martian would be so proud! :)

Comis, I'm gonna re-do my survival kit! :thumbsup:
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Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2014, 05:29:14 AM »
Folks, some very hearty recommendations and I just change my self profile to 'The Unofficial Modulizer'!   :cheers:

Let's go with "MODULIZE" & see how that works. :shrug:
And one who modulizes would be a "modulator." 

Marvin the Martian would be so proud! :)

Comis, I'm gonna re-do my survival kit! :thumbsup:

Love to see it sometime, and do feel free to make a link or post here!   :popcorn:

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2014, 03:02:38 PM »
Modulate?


:taunt:

Offline wolfy

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2014, 03:17:08 PM »
To be more exact, I think the word we are after is "MODULARIZE".....

mod-u-lar-ize (ˈmɒdʒ ə ləˌraɪz)

v.t. -ized, -iz-ing.
to form or organize into modules, as for flexibility.
[1955-60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary,  2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.


I just KNEW that major in English had to come in handy for SOMETHING! :doh:
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Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2014, 09:13:30 PM »
To be more exact, I think the word we are after is "MODULARIZE".....

mod-u-lar-ize (ˈmɒdʒ ə ləˌraɪz)

v.t. -ized, -iz-ing.
to form or organize into modules, as for flexibility.
[1955-60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary,  2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.


I just KNEW that major in English had to come in handy for SOMETHING! :doh:

I KNEW there's gonna be an English major in every forum...

Errr...Modularizer it is.  Try to say it ten times really fast... :rofl:

Offline abo4ster

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2014, 05:16:28 PM »
Hi, everyone.

This is a video I made for my no budget 72 hours outdoor survival kit, and I'd like to seek your advice on how best to improve and what else you would use instead.

Hi Comis.  Well done video and thought out contents.  As you asked, here are my thoughts on the subject as it relates to your kit.  By the way, I am no expert either.

As you mentioned Mors, here are a few of his quotes that stick out for me on the subject first though.

Quote
?Your clothing is the most important survival tool you have.  Dress properly and any emergency you may have to endure becomes more manageable.?  - MORS KOCHANSKI, Basic Safe Travel and Boreal Survival Handbook

Quote
?The quality of a survival kit is determined how much it can help you when you need to sleep.  If you can sleep well at night, you have it made.  It should also assist you in meeting your water needs.?  - MORS KOCHANSKI, Survival Kit Ideas pocketbook

Quote
?Next to knowing how to dress well, fire is one of the most important bush skills there are, because it is one of the few means available to make up most great deficiencies.? - MORS KOCHANSKI, Basic Safe Travel and Boreal Survival Handbook

Based on that excellent advice, and to reinforce some of the things you have in your kit, I consider the key elements of what I carry are those that reduce heat loss and knowing how to use them, as well as producing heat.

As many here know, I am huge fan of drum liners, mylar blankets, and cordage.  With a couple of drum liners I can shelter and get rest by reducing heat loss.  Add fire, cordage and a mylar blanket, and I could be down right comfortable.

Without a doubt, EXPOSURE (usually hypothermia), is the thing that does in most folks.  Even though you have a lot of stuff, you didn't compromise on the blanket or emergency poncho which is great.  Here are my suggestions for slight improvement:

--  Exchange the poncho for the more versatile drum liner, 2 if possible.

--  More duct tape, wrapped lengthwise around a hotel room key.  Duct tape is extremely versatile, from shelter building to gear repair to first aid.

--  Hacksaw blade for metal match scraper (in case I missed what you use).  Mors states that the scraper is 1/4 of the equation when using with a metal match.  I know you have a knife, but you don't want to use that if you don't have to, and, the hacksaw may actually make better magnesium shavings than the knife blade.  You should test on your mag bar.

--  If you are ok with the cordage you have for stringing up an improvised shelter, cool.  I like paracord FWIW.  As I am sure you know, 10' can broken down to 80', etc. for stringing up a shelter.  And that can be broken down even further to serve as fishing line and thread.  But I would carry all I could, 10' is just an example.  By the way, the concern I had here was fishing line or dental floss may cut into the material you are using.

--  Fresnel lens for fire, reading the fine print, splinters, etc.

--  I am done with liquid dampened compasses of that size.  I have the CountyComm SERE.  They even have a smaller version.

--  I think you did about as good as you can get on water for that size kit.  I like the chlorine dioxide tablets, although they actually don't contain chlorine (as most think), so there should be no taste really.  The only time I notice any taste from them is if the water is especially pure and then maybe a slight medicine taste.  Giardia takes ~10 days for symptoms to occur.  Crypto 4 to 14 days with the average being 7.  As you said, drink the water if you can't treat knowing you can likely get treatment later.  Better to drink and get treatment later (if you need it) than die of dehydration.  If you get sick in that 72 hour period, it was likely poor hygiene or toxic water.

--  You didn't mention, but if you had to, you can boil water in the tin.  That would be a pain and considering the reality of what a true situation may hold, would be an unlikely choice.  Nonetheless, it is available.

--  With the average 72 hour scenario in mind, no one will starve to death in that short of time.  However, a few hard candies in lieu of the snare wire, etc. would likely go farther if you expend your immediate energy.  Say you "hit the wall" with a sugar crash and need to climb out of a canyon as an example.  Iffy suggestion and I wouldn't do it in my immediate kit as I play in bear country, but food for thought, pun intended.

Offline wolfy

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2014, 10:07:28 PM »
EXCELLENT post, Chris! :thumbsup:
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Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2014, 02:47:45 AM »
Hi, everyone.

This is a video I made for my no budget 72 hours outdoor survival kit, and I'd like to seek your advice on how best to improve and what else you would use instead.

Hi Comis.  Well done video and thought out contents.  As you asked, here are my thoughts on the subject as it relates to your kit.  By the way, I am no expert either.

As you mentioned Mors, here are a few of his quotes that stick out for me on the subject first though.

Quote
?Your clothing is the most important survival tool you have.  Dress properly and any emergency you may have to endure becomes more manageable.?  - MORS KOCHANSKI, Basic Safe Travel and Boreal Survival Handbook

Quote
?The quality of a survival kit is determined how much it can help you when you need to sleep.  If you can sleep well at night, you have it made.  It should also assist you in meeting your water needs.?  - MORS KOCHANSKI, Survival Kit Ideas pocketbook

Quote
?Next to knowing how to dress well, fire is one of the most important bush skills there are, because it is one of the few means available to make up most great deficiencies.? - MORS KOCHANSKI, Basic Safe Travel and Boreal Survival Handbook

Based on that excellent advice, and to reinforce some of the things you have in your kit, I consider the key elements of what I carry are those that reduce heat loss and knowing how to use them, as well as producing heat.

As many here know, I am huge fan of drum liners, mylar blankets, and cordage.  With a couple of drum liners I can shelter and get rest by reducing heat loss.  Add fire, cordage and a mylar blanket, and I could be down right comfortable.

Without a doubt, EXPOSURE (usually hypothermia), is the thing that does in most folks.  Even though you have a lot of stuff, you didn't compromise on the blanket or emergency poncho which is great.  Here are my suggestions for slight improvement:

--  Exchange the poncho for the more versatile drum liner, 2 if possible.

--  More duct tape, wrapped lengthwise around a hotel room key.  Duct tape is extremely versatile, from shelter building to gear repair to first aid.

--  Hacksaw blade for metal match scraper (in case I missed what you use).  Mors states that the scraper is 1/4 of the equation when using with a metal match.  I know you have a knife, but you don't want to use that if you don't have to, and, the hacksaw may actually make better magnesium shavings than the knife blade.  You should test on your mag bar.

--  If you are ok with the cordage you have for stringing up an improvised shelter, cool.  I like paracord FWIW.  As I am sure you know, 10' can broken down to 80', etc. for stringing up a shelter.  And that can be broken down even further to serve as fishing line and thread.  But I would carry all I could, 10' is just an example.  By the way, the concern I had here was fishing line or dental floss may cut into the material you are using.

--  Fresnel lens for fire, reading the fine print, splinters, etc.

--  I am done with liquid dampened compasses of that size.  I have the CountyComm SERE.  They even have a smaller version.

--  I think you did about as good as you can get on water for that size kit.  I like the chlorine dioxide tablets, although they actually don't contain chlorine (as most think), so there should be no taste really.  The only time I notice any taste from them is if the water is especially pure and then maybe a slight medicine taste.  Giardia takes ~10 days for symptoms to occur.  Crypto 4 to 14 days with the average being 7.  As you said, drink the water if you can't treat knowing you can likely get treatment later.  Better to drink and get treatment later (if you need it) than die of dehydration.  If you get sick in that 72 hour period, it was likely poor hygiene or toxic water.

--  You didn't mention, but if you had to, you can boil water in the tin.  That would be a pain and considering the reality of what a true situation may hold, would be an unlikely choice.  Nonetheless, it is available.

--  With the average 72 hour scenario in mind, no one will starve to death in that short of time.  However, a few hard candies in lieu of the snare wire, etc. would likely go farther if you expend your immediate energy.  Say you "hit the wall" with a sugar crash and need to climb out of a canyon as an example.  Iffy suggestion and I wouldn't do it in my immediate kit as I play in bear country, but food for thought, pun intended.

Thank you very much for a very detailed reply, btw, I love your site.  :cheers:

Drum liners is a brilliant idea, I am still in process to find something that is thicker than the traditional trash bags I found locally, but not so heavy that it actually weight like a blanket.  But definitely a good call.

I have a small amount in kit, but you are right, more could be better.  I did remember Mors mentioning duct tape is 'antiseptic' in treating wounds, I have no way to verify that but I trust him for his expertise.  Let me figure some way to carry more  :)

I actually use the back of the saw on Swiss army knife to scrape the ferro rod and mag bar.  It works reasonably well.  The mag bar is just added bonus, but yes, different manufacturer does yield massively different result.  I found Doan is rather reliable a brand for mag bar.

Cordage and shelter are usually what most small survival kit may miss.  I think the debate that's always going on in the back of my head is--whether I want a kit that is all self containing, so we will be ready just with the kit, or we think out of the box, and allow certain items to go oversize for better performance.  I think having 30+ feet of paracord will be a great supplement and a joy to use, yet it is probably prudent to have some form of cordage inside the kit for worst case scenario.

4x Fresnel lens, checked.  :)

Excellent suggestion on liquidless compass, reminded me of some European military SERE compass, I will get it to try.  I am only always lurk warm about using small compass like this, they often loss their ability to point north quickly and I just hope to find something that is more durable.

I have a love/hate relationship with Chloride dioxide based water purification tabs, I did tested and drank with it for a few days in the past for testing purposes.  Maybe it is a personal thing, but to me, there is a pretty noticeable 'chloride' taste to the water, and definitely remind me of swimming pool.  :crazy:  Do you have other brands that you have tried and recommended, with less taste?   Something like coolaid will hide the taste, but that's another story entirely.  In terms of water hygiene, I did happen to drink some unclean water in the past(for working oversea), and it did cause me to have serious diarrhea within half a day.  Some I do suggest to always include some form of meds to stop that, even though we know Crypto/Giardia may take a few days to develop.

Good point on tin boiling, and I can't agree more how it may be a pain in the xss to keep doing that.  I have included some very heavy duty foil/thin tin for boiling water, so I am glad I may not have to resort to tin-water-boiling.  I think the beauty of having water bag and purification tabs is another viable option, so we are not solely relying on boiling to purify.

I did just recently ordered some Mainstay bar, so I will conduct some testing soon to see whether how well I could function solely on Mainstay.  But just a one thought do pop in mind is--unless we have adequate amount of water during survival situation, eating food may cause craving for more water.

Thanks again, and keep the food coming.  :D

Offline wolfy

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #28 on: August 05, 2014, 07:30:18 AM »
COMIS, you mentioned that you would like to find a more 'permanent' solution to the small compass choices that Chris offered.  I have personal experience with this one in the link provided.....I have carried it every it every single day, in the watch pocket of my bibs, for several years and my wife has sent it through the washing machine at least twice and once through the dryer, so it has been 'tested' under tougher conditions than you would normally expect any compass to encounter and it STILL points to magnetic north as well as the day I got it.  It's "WOLFY APPROVED!" :thumbsup:

You can get it 'compensated' for the magnetic declination in your area OR 'non-compensated' if you request it, which makes way more sense to me.  If you never left the area for which it was corrected, the 'compensated' model would be fine, but a real can-of-worms to figure out if you did.

http://www.trunord.com/
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Offline abo4ster

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2014, 08:13:27 AM »
Thanks Wolfy!  TruNord make a great compass and they will do so for your declination which is unique.  I have one of those too! 

Hi Comis,

Appreciate your comments and kit.

I like the plain old 1.1 mil drum liner you get at Home Depot.  I find them the same or slightly stronger than most of the emergency ponchos.  Put in a ziploc type bag they take up the virtually the same space and weight.  I believe 55 gallon drum liners to be the best compromise too.  Contractor bags are too heavy and bulky and leaf bags too flimsy, for my taste anyway.

The small key ring mag bar (sparky) you have is what I carry.  Suggest you don't consider the magnesium a luxury, for the size of your kit especially.  When the chips are down, that little pile of magnesium makes a brief radiant flame allowing you to light tinder you may not otherwise get with a metal match alone.  I've been in the presence of other survival instructors who tried to light material with large ferro rods using awls as scrapers and fail, where I lit the same exact tinder with a little magnesium from sparky.  Doan makes a great bar and the large ones like that will be advantageous under stress, but that's another thread.

I like the micro pur tabs for chlorine dioxide.  Can't speak for the other brands taste, but the micro pur has worked great for me.  If there is a little organic material in the water I collect, I notice no taste whatsoever after treatment, I assume that is from the tabs doing their work.  If I collect extremely clean mountain water with no visible organic matter, then I notice a very slight taste.  Anything is better than gagging on 2% tincture of iodine. 

 :)

Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #30 on: August 05, 2014, 09:38:42 AM »
COMIS, you mentioned that you would like to find a more 'permanent' solution to the small compass choices that Chris offered.  I have personal experience with this one in the link provided.....I have carried it every it every single day, in the watch pocket of my bibs, for several years and my wife has sent it through the washing machine at least twice and once through the dryer, so it has been 'tested' under tougher conditions than you would normally expect any compass to encounter and it STILL points to magnetic north as well as the day I got it.  It's "WOLFY APPROVED!" :thumbsup:

You can get it 'compensated' for the magnetic declination in your area OR 'non-compensated' if you request it, which makes way more sense to me.  If you never left the area for which it was corrected, the 'compensated' model would be fine, but a real can-of-worms to figure out if you did.

http://www.trunord.com/

Wolfy,

Very small world we live in!  Here I am probably half way around the world from you, and I too am a user of TruNord!  I have been using it on and off on my EDC backpack, just hanging from the shoulder strap, for almost a year now, and it too still work like a champ.  Can't be more happy about that.  :cheers:

Offline comis

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Re: No Budget 72 hours Outdoor Survival Kit
« Reply #31 on: August 05, 2014, 10:15:48 AM »
Thanks Wolfy!  TruNord make a great compass and they will do so for your declination which is unique.  I have one of those too! 

Hi Comis,

Appreciate your comments and kit.

I like the plain old 1.1 mil drum liner you get at Home Depot.  I find them the same or slightly stronger than most of the emergency ponchos.  Put in a ziploc type bag they take up the virtually the same space and weight.  I believe 55 gallon drum liners to be the best compromise too.  Contractor bags are too heavy and bulky and leaf bags too flimsy, for my taste anyway.

The small key ring mag bar (sparky) you have is what I carry.  Suggest you don't consider the magnesium a luxury, for the size of your kit especially.  When the chips are down, that little pile of magnesium makes a brief radiant flame allowing you to light tinder you may not otherwise get with a metal match alone.  I've been in the presence of other survival instructors who tried to light material with large ferro rods using awls as scrapers and fail, where I lit the same exact tinder with a little magnesium from sparky.  Doan makes a great bar and the large ones like that will be advantageous under stress, but that's another thread.

I like the micro pur tabs for chlorine dioxide.  Can't speak for the other brands taste, but the micro pur has worked great for me.  If there is a little organic material in the water I collect, I notice no taste whatsoever after treatment, I assume that is from the tabs doing their work.  If I collect extremely clean mountain water with no visible organic matter, then I notice a very slight taste.  Anything is better than gagging on 2% tincture of iodine. 

 :)


Abo4ster,

Once again great info.  Thanks a lot to pointing me in the right direction for the 1.1 mil/55 gallon drum liner, I will make sure I go visit a home depot next time when I am in US, or find stores that may sell them where I live.

I like your way of thinking to ensure fire starting capability for a small kit, you are probably right about giving more credit to the magnesium bar. 
And along the same line of thinking, I also put in 8 tinder quik as tinder material since I have tried lighting it, after submersing and soaking them in water more than a minute, and they are pretty good for their size and performance.
Personally, I do place fire as a high priority on my list, not only it can keep core body temperature up and able to boil water, it is a huge moral booster and a great signal method.  Currently there are five devices in the kit that could help start a fire(lighter, spark-lite, plain ferro rod, 'sparky' and fresnel lens), some may consider that a little excessive, but I think one will think otherwise when a fire can't be lit for whatever in a cold/wet night.   ;D

The Micro pur tabs tips is great, and maybe that's the reason why they are always out-of-stock everywhere I try buying them.  I will locate some and give it a try someday.  :)