Author Topic: The Picayune Creole Cookbook Sixth Edition (circa 1922)  (Read 116 times)

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Offline PetrifiedWood

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The Picayune Creole Cookbook Sixth Edition (circa 1922)
« on: October 11, 2017, 07:09:34 PM »

Offline wolfy

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Re: The Picayune Creole Cookbook Sixth Edition (circa 1922)
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 08:47:29 PM »
ALLLLLRIGHT! :drool: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Thanks, PW! :cheers:
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: The Picayune Creole Cookbook Sixth Edition (circa 1922)
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2017, 10:18:59 PM »
I have a much later edition from the 80s in hardcover but this 6th edition still holds up today if you know how to interpret the kitchen vernacular of the time. For example, one recipe directs you to use a "very fast oven". I'd guess around 375 to 425 degrees, give or take. You get the idea.

There are even recipes for what I was told were "pool-dews", a type of waterfowl people said were trash birds. In French they are poulet d'eau or "water chicken". Who knew? :D

Anyone living near the coast will find tons of great oyster and crab recipes.

The sauces section has a recipe for mayonnaise that might be worth trying out. It's also worth noting that their file' gumbo recipe lacks tomatoes while the crab gumbo recipe calls for them.

And of course as with any old recipes, some ingredients will require substitutions for things that aren't available anymore or are really hard to find.

I looked for a red beans and rice recipe but didn't find one. I did find a red bean soup recipe which is almost the same, but requires you to press the cooked beans through a colander, which wouldn't leave any intact.

Offline wolfy

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Re: The Picayune Creole Cookbook Sixth Edition (circa 1922)
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2017, 10:34:01 PM »
The Boudin Blanc recipe was entirely different from anything I'd seen before, too.  The Boudin with the blood sounded more familiar to me, but no rice was used in either one. :shrug:   Fun to look through and discover new dishes & techniques, though.  :stir:
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: The Picayune Creole Cookbook Sixth Edition (circa 1922)
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 06:45:05 AM »
Thanks for the link! I enjoy cooking & different types of cook book recipes.
 :)


"Pool-dews" (Poule D'eau) are American Coots. Around here they are called "Mud Ducks".



We did not shoot them much. Somewhat different flavor than other ducks due to their diet. But, they were a good decoy to have in /near your decoy sets as a "comfort" indicator to the other ducks. If they saw coots they sometimes were more likely to commit to coming in, because they felt safer with the coots there. A heron or crane decoy is added also for the same reason, when you are hunting shallower waters.


Anyway, once again thanks for the link!
 :)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: The Picayune Creole Cookbook Sixth Edition (circa 1922)
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2017, 10:59:56 AM »
Thanks for the link! I enjoy cooking & different types of cook book recipes.
 :)


"Pool-dews" (Poule D'eau) are American Coots. Around here they are called "Mud Ducks".



We did not shoot them much. Somewhat different flavor than other ducks due to their diet. But, they were a good decoy to have in /near your decoy sets as a "comfort" indicator to the other ducks. If they saw coots they sometimes were more likely to commit to coming in, because they felt safer with the coots there. A heron or crane decoy is added also for the same reason, when you are hunting shallower waters.


Anyway, once again thanks for the link!
 :)

Interestingly enough, the book mentions the Cajuns of the time considering them to be "seafood" and eating them on Fridays during Lent.  8)