Blades and Bushlore

General Discussion => Food and Cooking => Topic started by: PetrifiedWood on March 12, 2012, 11:26:12 AM

Title: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on March 12, 2012, 11:26:12 AM
Post your recipes in this thread. You are welcome to start a thread to discuss a recipe. If you want it to be easily found, post it here as well. Please limit posts in this thread to recipes only, and discuss the recipes in their own threads.
Title: Low Carb BBQ Sauce Recipe
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 12, 2012, 10:28:57 PM
Low Carb BBQ Sauce Recipe
by Half Axe

This recipe was given to me by a friend.  A tablespoon of this sauce has about 3 g of carbs compared to the 9 to 15 g you find in commercial sauces.

2 T butter
1 clove garlic or 1 t garlic powder
1/4 c. finely chopped onion or 1 T dried minced onion
1 T lemon juice
1 c. tomato sauce
1/3 c. Splenda
1 T molasses
2 T Worcestershire sauce
1 T chili powder
1 T vinegar
1 t coarse ground black pepper
1/4 t salt

Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan and bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer for 5 -10 minutes, stirring occasionally; remove from heat and let stand.  I usually double the batch and keep some in a pint canning jar with lid in the fridge - it will keep for a couple of months, but it rarely lasts that long at my house.

I use the sauce to make BBQ Beef or Venison.  I take a 3 lb. beef or venison roast, tenderize it with a fork, season with salt and pepper, coat with olive oil, place in a cast iron pot with lid, and cook in the oven at 250oF for 4 to 5 hours, until the internal temperature reaches 195oF.  Use two forks to shred the meat, then mix the sauce in to a good consistency - meat well covered, but not runny.  I haven't tried this recipe with pork, but others have reported to me that it is very good for pulled pork.
Title: Rosemary Rice
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 12, 2012, 10:32:34 PM
Rosemary Rice
By Old Philosopher

I have to throw this recipe in the mix. It's my son's favorite way to fix rice.

1 cu              -- long grain rice (not instant)
2 1/4            -- cu water
1 - 1 1/2 Tbs -- fresh rosemary leaves, slightly chopped, not too small
2 tsp             --cooking oil, or 1 Tbs shortening

All measurements except the rice and water are just guidelines.

In a sauce pan (or billy) heat the oil until it starts to swirl.
Toss in the rosemary and give it just a second to sizzle and toast. (don't burn it!)
Toss in the rice. Stir constantly until the rice is coated with the oil, hot throughout, and begins to toast, or becomes transparent.
Toss in the cold water and stand back! It's going to sputter. The cold water hits the hot rice and cracks the grains. This tenderizes the grains, and lets them absorb more water.
Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring to avoid sticking to the bottom of the pan.
Cover tightly and move the pan to low heat where the temperature will stay just below a low simmer.
Let it sit there for 30-40 minutes to steam.
Remove from the heat, remove the lid, fluff the rice with a fork and replace the cover until ready to eat.
Salt, butter and pepper to taste.
Title: Garlic/Dill Pasta
Post by: Old Philosopher on March 14, 2012, 05:57:19 PM
One of my favorite snacks, or side dishes. I learned this recipe with dill and pepper only, but added the garlic to suite my taste buds.

Garlic/Dill Pasta

1 10oz-12oz package (~2 cu) of garden rotini pasta (the spiral stuff with differnt flavors/colors)
1 Tbs dill weed (more, or less to taste)
2 tsp dry granulated garlic (again, to taste)
Fresh cracked black pepper/Salt (to taste)
1 cup (approx) mayonaise

Cook the pasta per package directions until al dente. Rinse under cold water to stop the cooking and cool the pasta. Place in a mixing bowl and add the mayonaise a bit at a time. Toss to coat. Add more mayo until it's just slightly wetter than you think is enough, because the pasta will absorb some liquid after sitting. Don't be afraid to go over the 1 cup suggestion, either. Add the dill weed, and garlic and mix throughly without breaking up the pasta. Add the pepper a pinch at a time until you get the taste you want. Add a good pinch of salt, but don't over do it. Let your guests salt and pepper more to suit their own tastes.

Most all of my recipes are going to be "to taste", because that's how I cook. Recipe quantities are a guide, and more or less of something is a matter of personal taste. A recipe that calls for "3 cloves of garlic" usually gets 5, or 6 in our household.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Yeoman on March 14, 2012, 06:46:32 PM
Pea Soup for Camping (makes 1-2 servings)
This is a favourite of mine when out in chilly weather.
I normally cook this up in a small coffee can or in a 2L camping pot on a low fire.

1/2 Cup split yellow peas
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground cumin
3 whole cloves garlic
4 pieces of bacon frozen
3-5 cups water

At home: place first four ingredients in a zip lock bag and put the frozen bacon in a separate bag inside the first bag.

At the camp site, boil 3 cups water using your preferred method. Cube the bacon and add it to the water and bring back to a boil. Add the remaining ingredients and return to boil again. Simmer the soup for 30-60 minutes adding water as necessary. Stir occasionally. it is ready when the peas are soft and it reaches the consistency of semi-runny oatmeal.

Title: Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
Post by: PetrifiedWood on March 14, 2012, 07:47:18 PM
This is a recipe I sort of came up with on my own. It's an amalgam of several gumbo recipes. "gumbo" is an African word, meaning "okra". But this recipe instead uses file' powder to thicken it at the table, rather than okra in the ingredients. Purists will insist that if it doesn't have okra, it isn't gumbo. However the French Creoles in the country north of New Orleans made gumbo without okra all the time.

Anyhow, here goes...

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

Ingredients
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup vegetable oil (or bacon grease)
1 bell pepper chopped
1 onion chopped
2-3 stalks celery chopped
2 medium boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut into 1" pieces
1 lb. smoked sausage cut into 1/4" thick rounds
1 bay leaf
2 small to medium cloves garlic, minced or pressed
Chicken stock - 2 or more cups
Tony Chachere's creole seasoning
salt and pepper to taste
Gumbo file' powder
Cayenne pepper
long grain white rice

Start by chopping your "trinity" of onions, bell pepper and celery, then put them together in a bowl and set them aside, along with the minced garlic. Then in a big cast iron skillet, brown the chicken and sausage well, and set aside.

In a big pot, add flour and oil (or bacon grease) and over medium-high heat, keep stirring until the flour turns chocolate brown. This is making a roux. You have to stir constantly or it will burn and you'll need to start over. Any black flecks of burnt flour will ruin the flavor.

As soon as the roux gets close to the chocolate brown color, add in the chopped vegetables. This will help prevent the roux from burning. Keep the vegetables moving in the pot just to be safe, for another 30 seconds to a minute. You want them to wilt and glaze a little. They will smell just awesome at this point.

After the veggies have wilted some, then you can add 2 cups of chicken stock, and then the chicken and sausage, and the bay leaf. Also add about 2 level teaspoons of the Tony Chachere's creole seasoning, and add about 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper. If you need more liquid, add just enough to barely cover the contents of the pot. You want them all to be wet, but not so much as to thin out the soup too much. Let this simmer on medium-low heat for an hour. After an hour, taste it and add Tony's seasoning until the heat level is to your liking, then add salt until the salt level is to your liking. Before serving, skim off the excess oil from the surface. Oxo makes a great oil separator for the purpose that is a lot easier than trying to scoop it all up with a spoon. Remove and discard the bay leaf.

While the gumbo is simmering for an hour, you can start your rice so it will be ready when the gumbo is done.

To serve, use wide brimmed soup bowls and place a scoop of white rice in the center of the bowl, then ladle the gumbo around the outside. You can sprinkle about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of file powder onto the gumbo, and a little more on the brim of the bowl and the top of the rice for a garnish. Do the same with a tiny bit of cayenne pepper for color.

This is best served with some french bread garlic toast.

This same recipe can be modified by eliminating the sausage, and using a lot less chicken stock. The chicken breasts are increased from 2 to 4. Brown them as before and set aside. Make the roux in a deep skillet instead of a pot. When the roux is ready, add the veggies and then just enough chicken stock to keep from burning, then simmer covered over low heat for an hour until the chicken is fully cooked and tender. Taste and season as before. Serve this over rice and you'll have a nice chicken fricassee.!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Half Axe on March 14, 2012, 08:24:14 PM
Crispy Coated Walleye

walleye fillets
1 c. all purpose flour
1 T Old Bay Seasoning
1 egg
1/2 c. milk
2 c. potato flakes (crushed corn flakes can be substituted)

Mix the flour and seasoning in one bowl and the egg and milk in another.  Rinse the fillets and coat with the flour/seasoning, dip in the egg/milk, and coat with the potato flakes.  Put a half-inch of oil in a cast iron fry pan and get it hot.  Fry the fillets.  Eat and repeat.

Title: Dutch Oven Roadkill Chicken
Post by: Frugal Bohemian on March 15, 2012, 09:44:54 AM
Roadkill Chicken in the Dutch Oven

I call this Roadkill Chicken because it's flattened out with a method called Spatchcock.  To spatchcock a chicken, you use shears or a knife to cut on either side of the backbone and remove it.  Then you press down firmly on the inside of the chicken and flatten the breast against the cutting board.  You'll hear a very distinct cracking (like cracking your knuckles) as the bird takes it's new, albeit unflattering, shape.  Once you've flattened your bird, in a small bowl mix:


Mix this up into a paste.  Add whatever herbs you have on hand, don't be stingy with em.  Peel up the skin of the bird and massage this paste between the skin and the meat, making sure you coat the meat nicely.  Really try and get that stuff into the nooks and crannies.  Any leftover herbs and oil can be smeared on the outside of the chicken.

Prepare a large dutch oven (12" is the smallest you can realistically use) on a bed of coals, and add a few Tbsp of oil.  When it's nice and hot, plop that bird skin-side-down into the DO and let it sear for 10-15 min.  (Don't move it!!)  After it's good and crispy, you can carefully flip it over.   NOTE: You want to make sure you don't leave skin on the bottom of the DO, so use a spatula or 2, and take your time!

Flip the bird and place it skin-side-up on a roasting rack or a few potatoes or chunked root veggies (radishes, carrots, potatoes, rutabagas, whatever......go crazy!).  You want it elevated and off the bottom of the DO (but not touching the cover) so it gets a nice crispy skin.  Place the cover on the DO and cover it completely with hot coals.  You'll want a DO temp of around 450o.  Check the bird after 45 minutes to see if how she's coming along.  You'll probably want to add some new coals at this point, for the final heating.

One more thing.  When the bird is done and resting (it will reabsorb the juices while it rests) and the veggies are plated, you might as well make some gravy to round out the meal.  Mix up a couple teaspoons of corn starch and add it to a 1/2 cup or so of cold water and whisk it around.  Slowly add this to the simmering juices in the Dutch Oven, stirring constantly.  Make sure to scrape all of the good tasty bits off the bottom of the DO.  When the gravy is nice and rich, pour it off into a gravy boat.

Dutch Oven cooking requires a bit of observation, coal-maintenance, and trial and error but it pays off.  Don't be afraid to experiment, it's the essence of cooking!
Title: Re: Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
Post by: Moe M. on March 15, 2012, 11:07:17 AM
This is a recipe I sort of came up with on my own. It's an amalgam of several gumbo recipes. "gumbo" is an African word, meaning "okra". But this recipe instead uses file' powder to thicken it at the table, rather than okra in the ingredients. Purists will insist that if it doesn't have okra, it isn't gumbo. However the French Creoles in the country north of New Orleans made gumbo without okra all the time.

Anyhow, here goes...

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

 
Ingredients
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup vegetable oil (or bacon grease)
1 bell pepper chopped
1 onion chopped
2 stalks celery chopped
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut into 1" pieces
1 lb. smoked sausage cut into 1/4" thick rounds
1 bay leaf
2 cloves garlic, minced
Water - 2 or more cups
Tony Chachere's creole seasoning
salt and pepper to taste
Gumbo file' powder
Cayenne pepper
long grain white rice

Start by chopping your "trinity" of onions, bell pepper and celery, then put them together in a bowl and set them aside, along with the minced garlic. Then in a big pot, brown the chicken and sausage well, and set aside.

In the same pot, add flour and oil and over medium-high heat, keep stirring until the flour turns chocolate brown. This is making a roux. You have to stir constantly or it will burn and you'll need to start over. Any black flecks of burnt flour will ruin the flavor.

As soon as the roux gets close to the chocolate brown color, add in the chopped vegetables. This will help prevent the roux from burning. Keep the vegetables moving in the pot just to be safe, for another 30 seconds to a minute. You want them to wilt and glaze a little. They will smell just awesome at this point.

After the veggies have wilted some, then you can add 2 cups of water, and then the chicken and sausage, and the bay leaf. Also add about 2 level teaspoons of the Tony Chachere's creole seasoning, and add about 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper. If you need more water, add just enough to barely cover the contents of the pot. You want them all to be wet, but not so much water as to thin out the soup too much. Let this simmer on medium-low heat for an hour. After an hour, taste it and add Tony's seasoning until the heat level is to your liking, then add salt until the salt level is to your liking. Before serving, skim off the excess oil from the surface. Oxo makes a great oil separator for the purpose that is a lot easier than trying to scoop it all up with a spoon. Remove and discard the bay leaf.

While the gumbo is simmering for an hour, you can start your rice so it will be ready when the gumbo is done.

To serve, use wide brimmed soup bowls and place a scoop of white rice in the center of the bowl, then ladle the gumbo around the outside. You can sprinkle about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of file powder onto the gumbo, and a little more on the brim of the bowl and the top of the rice for a garnish. Do the same with a tiny bit of cayenne pepper for color.

This is best served with some french bread garlic toast.

This same recipe can be modified by eliminating the sausage, and using a lot less water. The chicken breasts are increased from 2 to 4. Brown them as before and set aside. Make the roux in a deep skillet instead of a pot. When the roux is ready, add the veggies and then just enough water to keep from burning, then simmer covered over low heat for an hour until the chicken is fully cooked and tender. Taste and season as before. Serve this over rice and you'll have a nice chicken fricassee.!

  It sounds great,  I'd love to try it,  can you or anybody tell me of a substitute for the two ingredients that us northern folks can't usually find up here,  Tony Chacheres Creole Seasonings,  and Gumbo File powder.
  And while we can get Zatarans rice mixes,  we can't find their other seasonings and breading mixes.

  Thanks.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on March 15, 2012, 10:58:07 PM
 Soup to me is comfort food this Black Bean soup  is one of my favorites. This a quick and easy soup to make in base camp or at home to really warm your soul on cold & rainy days
20 MIN BLACK BEAN SOUP

Ingredients

1 tbsp Olive Oil
1 cup Onion, Chopped
4 Garlic Clove
1 tsp Spices, Chili Powder
31 oz Black Beans (Drained & Rinsed)
15 oz Tomatoes, Petite Diced
2 cups Low Sodium Chicken Stock
1 tsp Salt
1/4 cup Cilantro
2 Fresh Jalepeno Pepper


Directions

In a large pan, heat olive oil over medium. Add onion, Jalapeno and garlic, and cook 6-8 minutes, until beginnning to brown. Stir in cumin and chili powder. Add black beans, diced tomatoes, chicken broth, salt and cilantro. Bring to a boil, and allow to cook for 2 minutes. Transfer 1 c to a blender, and process until smooth(if cooking in camp smash the beans with the back of a spoon in the pot). Stir back into soup. Remove from heat, and serve topped with crema, jack cheese & warm corn tortillas on the side.
Title: Cheesy Ranch Hashbrowns
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 16, 2012, 10:59:36 PM
Ingredients:

Cheesy Ranch Hashbrowns.


A good handful of  frozen southern style hash brown potatoes, defrosted.
A hefty squirt of Ranch dressing.
 1/8 th cup milk.
 As much shreded cheddar cheese as you like.
If you have some sour cream throw a bit in.

 Heavy duty tin foil 

Instructions

Mix all ingredients then drugstore wrap in foil two times,put in campfire,20 minutes or so,until tender.

***  I wonder if one could put a slice of spam on the bottom along with this idea? ***

WW.
 

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on March 16, 2012, 11:47:27 PM
I've been baking sourdough bread every week  for the last 5 years and I have tried as many different starters. In the last 2 months I grew a new starter it is the best and easiest  and most economical to maintain out of any to date. It takes 10 days to mature until you can bake your first loaf. You will need a kitchen scale and a gallon of spring water and all purpose flour along with your mason jar.
 On Day one
measure 1 oz of flour and 1 oz of water into your jar stir to combine and place it some where that is about 70-75? stir it a few times a day
Day Two
Don't feed just stir you should see a few bubbles
Day Three
Feed I oz each water & flour and stir a few times
Day Four
Bubbling should be more active feed & stir
Day Five
it should start to smell like beer and be more active feed & stir 1 oz of flour and water
Day Six
Bubbles should be visible on the sides of the jar and it will start to have the sour smell feed & stir
Day Seven
it should be very active and bubbles should come to the surface  when stirred Feed and stir as before
 Day Eight
 Feed and stir
Day Nine
Feed and stir
Day Ten
Feed and stir in the morning around dinner time weigh out 4 oz of starter into a clean container with a lid feed this with 2oz flour and 1 oz water stir it up and put the lid on loosely Tomorrow You bake!

Day 11
Feed the starter to begin to replenish it ( I just keep it on the counter in the kitchen all the time)

This is Smokewalkers Sourdough Bread

I use a Kitchen-aide mixer so if you don't adjust accordingly
Measure into the bowl 1 1/2 ups flour and 1 tbl sugar stir them together
now add the starter that you removed last night and add it on top of the flour
measure another 1 1/2 cups flour and put it on top of the starter
Measure out 1 cup of milk and 1 tbl shortening warm in the microwave for 45 sec
pour the milk / shortening onto the flour put on the dough hook and mix until the dough pulls away from the bowl then starts sticking to the bowl again, Turn the mixer off and walk away or 20 min
measure out 1 tsp of salt before restarting the mixer sprinkle the salt onto the dough
restart the mixer add flour 1-2 tbl at a time until the dough no longer grabs the bottom of the bowl continue to knead for 5 min
 Prepare your loaf pan  with a lite coating of shortening then sprinkle with corn meal
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board and press it out flat into a rectangle about 10" long and 8 " wide. Fold the dough in thirds on the long side place seam side down in the prepared loaf pan cores with plastic wrap sprayed with Pam
It will take about 4-6 hrs to raise when it is about 1" above the pan preheat the oven to 400? bake on the center rack for 25-30 min.
Title: Amish Friendship Bread
Post by: Old Philosopher on March 17, 2012, 12:30:20 AM
AMISH FRIENDSHIP BREAD STARTER

1 pkg. active dry yeast
3 c. sugar
3 c. flour
3 c. milk
On Day 1: Soften yeast mixture in 1/4 cup of lukewarm water. Set aside for 5 minutes, then stir well to be sure it has dissolved.
In a glass or plastic bowl, combine 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk. Stir in yeast mixture using a wooden or plastic spoon (don't use metal spoon or electric mixer). Cover bowl loosely with paper towel, cloth, wax paper or plastic wrap. Keep at room temperature (don't refrigerate).
On Days 2, 3 and 4: Using wooden or plastic spoon, stir mixture once each day.
On Day 5: Add 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk; stir.
On Days 6, 7, 8 and 9: Using wooden or plastic spoon, stir mixture once each day.
On Day 10: Add 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk.
Remove 3 cups of mixture and give 1 cup each to three friends. Save remaining starter for yourself.

[Alternative:
Set aside 1 cu starter for your bread recipe.
Retain the other 2 cu of starter. You can place this in the refrigerator in a covered container for later use.
When you decide to bake again, remove another 1 cu of starter for the standard recipe.
To the remaining cup, add 1/2 cu flour, 1/2 cu sugar and 1/2 cu milk.
Stir this daily for 3-4 days.
Add another 1/2 cu each of flour, sugar and milk.
Stir for another 3-4 days.
You can now start the process again with the 3 cu of starter you have, or you can refrigerate the whole batch for up to a month.]


AMISH FRIENDSHIP BREAD (makes two 9"x5" loaves):

1 c. Amish friendship bread starter
2/3 c. oil
1 c. milk
3 eggs
2 c. flour
1 ?  tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 large box of vanilla pudding (not instant)
1 c. chopped nuts or raisins (optional)
2  tsp. cinnamon
1 c. sugar
In mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Bake in 2 well greased and floured or sugared 9"x5" bread pans. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the loaf comes out clean.
NOTE: Raisins, chopped apples, drained, crushed pineapple, candied fruit, coconut, mashed banana, dates, chopped nuts and/or chocolate chips (1/2 cup each) may be added to batter before baking.
You can also substitute other flavors of pudding for a change of pace.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on March 17, 2012, 09:41:51 AM
This Sourdough recipe is a Texas original that I got from a ranch cook out around Bandera years ago and makes some tasty bread.

Texas Sweet Sourdough Bread
INGREDIENTS:

For the starter
1 package dry yeast
5 1/2 cups warm water
1/3 cup sugar
3 tablespoons potato flakes (must be flakes)


To Use
1 cup starter
1 1/2 cup warm water
1/2 cup oil
1 1/2 tablespoon salt
1/3 cup sugar
9 cups  bread flour


PREPARATION:

Make the starter

Mix ingredients and place in a large glass jar set in a nice sunny or warm place for at least 4 hours. Mixture will become foamy and you will hear hissing from the lid of the jar. Pour off 1 cup of the mixture. At this point you can put this in another glass jar and refrigerate both jars or you can make some bread:

To use:

Mix together to form stiff dough and knead with hands until smooth and elastic. Place in a bowl oil the top and cover with plastic wrap. This can sit overnight in a warm place. Next day punch down fashion two loaves and place in greased/floured bread pans. Bake at 400/425 degrees for about 35 minutes.

Every time you want to make bread take the glass jar from the fridge and Feed starter again: 1 cup warm water, 1/3 cup sugar, 3 Tbsp potato flakes.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on March 24, 2012, 11:53:00 AM
  Quick Trail Soup

   * one cup of Orida Potato Buds
   * 1/2 cup of dry milk flakes
   * one tablespoon of granulated instant beef or chicken bouilion
   * one tablespoon of dried parsley
   * pinch of dried thyme
   * one teaspoon of dried onion bits
   Mix the above ingredients and store in zip lock bag.

   In camp,  get four cups of water boiling,  add the pre-packaged dry soup mix.
   Bring it back to a boil,  move it off the direct heat and simmer for a minute or two while stiring.
   Salt & pepper to taste.   

   Makes four servings.

  * For a heartyier soup,  boil two medium potatoes in the four cups of water (slightly salted)  either sliced or diced until fork tender,  then add the dried soup mix as per directions above.
   
 
Title: Egg in a Potato
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 25, 2012, 09:42:20 PM
Egg in a Potato

1 Med. Baking potato
1 Egg
Butter

Butter the outside of the potato, wrap in tin foil , and bake in the hot coals until done.  Remove from heat. Slice open the potato, but dont cut all the way through.  Open it up slightly, place a pat of butter inside.  Break an egg into the potato and return it to the coals , egg side up.  Bake until the egg is set.  Season with salt and pepper. 

From :  Camp Ground Cookery

WW.
Title: Spam Strudel
Post by: Old Philosopher on March 26, 2012, 05:10:05 PM
Say what? But the more I read this, the better it sounds. Any spiced meat should work.

SPAM VEGETABLE STRUDEL
 
 Recipe By     :
 Serving Size  : 6    Preparation Time :0:00
 Categories    : Main dish
 
   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
 --------  ------------  --------------------------------
    1       pk           Long-grain and wild rice
                         -mix (6.25 oz)
      1/2   c            Chopped carrot
      1/2   c            Chopped red bell pepper
      1/4   c            Orange juice
    1       cn           SPAM Luncheon Meat, cut in
                         -thin strips (12 oz)
    2       c            Chopped mushrooms
      1/4   c            Sliced green onions
    1       tb           Dijon-style mustard
      1/2   ts           Basil
      1/4   ts           Pepper
    6                    Sheets frozen phyllo pastry,
                         -thawed
                         Butter-flavor vegetable
                         -cooking spray
    1       tb           Dry bread crumbs
                         Soy sauce
 
   Heat oven to 375'F. Prepare rice according to package directions. In
   small saucepan, combine carrots, red pepper, and orange juice. Bring
   to a boil. Cover and cook 5-7 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain
   well. Place in medium bowl. In large skillet, saute SPAM, mushrooms,
   and green onion until tender. Add SPAM mixture, rice, mustard, basil,
   and pepper to vegetable mixture; stir well. Place 1 sheet phyllo
   pastry on a damp towel (keep remaining phyllo covered). Lightly coat
   phyllo with cooking spray. Layer remaining 5 sheets phyllo pastry on
   first sheet, lightly coating each sheet with cooking spray. Spoon
   SPAM mixture lengthwise down center of phyllo stack, leaving a 1/2?
   border. Roll phyllo jelly-roll style, starting with long side
   containing SPAM mixture. Tuck ends under; place diagonally, seam side
   down, on baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Lightly coat top of
   pastry with cooking spray and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Make 12
   (1/4? deep) diagonal slits across top of pastry using a sharp knife.
   Bake 20 minutes or until golden. Serve with soy sauce.
Title: Re: Spam Strudel
Post by: Moe M. on March 27, 2012, 07:46:57 AM
Say what? But the more I read this, the better it sounds. Any spiced meat should work.

SPAM VEGETABLE STRUDEL
 
 Recipe By     :
 Serving Size  : 6    Preparation Time :0:00
 Categories    : Main dish
 
   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
 --------  ------------  --------------------------------
    1       pk           Long-grain and wild rice
                         -mix (6.25 oz)
      1/2   c            Chopped carrot
      1/2   c            Chopped red bell pepper
      1/4   c            Orange juice
    1       cn           SPAM Luncheon Meat, cut in
                         -thin strips (12 oz)
    2       c            Chopped mushrooms
      1/4   c            Sliced green onions
    1       tb           Dijon-style mustard
      1/2   ts           Basil
      1/4   ts           Pepper
    6                    Sheets frozen phyllo pastry,
                         -thawed
                         Butter-flavor vegetable
                         -cooking spray
    1       tb           Dry bread crumbs
                         Soy sauce
 
   Heat oven to 375'F. Prepare rice according to package directions. In
   small saucepan, combine carrots, red pepper, and orange juice. Bring
   to a boil. Cover and cook 5-7 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain
   well. Place in medium bowl. In large skillet, saute SPAM, mushrooms,
   and green onion until tender. Add SPAM mixture, rice, mustard, basil,
   and pepper to vegetable mixture; stir well. Place 1 sheet phyllo
   pastry on a damp towel (keep remaining phyllo covered). Lightly coat
   phyllo with cooking spray. Layer remaining 5 sheets phyllo pastry on
   first sheet, lightly coating each sheet with cooking spray. Spoon
   SPAM mixture lengthwise down center of phyllo stack, leaving a 1/2?
   border. Roll phyllo jelly-roll style, starting with long side
   containing SPAM mixture. Tuck ends under; place diagonally, seam side
   down, on baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Lightly coat top of
   pastry with cooking spray and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Make 12
   (1/4? deep) diagonal slits across top of pastry using a sharp knife.
   Bake 20 minutes or until golden. Serve with soy sauce.

    Thanks OP,  My first thought was that in my little world Strudel has always been viewed as a sweet desert,  while the above sounds interesting,  it would take some getting used to on my part.

    But on second thought it doesn't sound too much different than the roll ups that I've made for party snacks using veggies and spicy Italian deli meats wrapped in rolled puff pastry dough,  baked and then sliced into rounds.
Title: Smokewalker's Tortilla recipe
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 27, 2012, 08:21:41 PM
Tortilla's

Aint nothing better than a fresh cooked Tortilla fresh off the comal, with a little butter and a sprinkle of salt. I prefer maize for everything cept for burritos.
 Rog if you want to make your own this recipe makes a good one.

 Awesome Tortillas

1 cup (4 1/2 ounces) bread flour
1 cup (4 ounces) masa harina
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt12 teaspoons baking powder
1 tablespoon olive oil
2/3 cup water
Procedures

1. Put the flour, masa harina, sugar, salt, and baking powder in your food processor fitted with the proper blade for working dough. Pulse a few times to distribute the ingredients. Add the oil, turn the processor on, and with it running, add the water through the feed tube as fast as the flour will absorb it. It should form a ball - if it doesn't, add tiny bit more water to get it to form that cohesive ball.
2. Continue processing for another minute. The dough will feel gritty from the masa harina, but it should also feel like a cohesive dough. Put the dough in a plastic bag or in a small bowl covered with plastic wrap. Set aside to rest for 20 min. It

3. Preheat a cast iron frying pan, griddle, or other heavy pan on the stovetop.

4. Flour your work surface and turn out the dough. Divide it into 8 even pieces. Form each piece into a ball, then flatten the first ball into a disk. Roll it with a rolling pin to circle about 6-8 inches in diameter.

5. Place the circle in the preheated pan and cook until you see large bubbles forming and the bottom has browned spots - about a minute. Flip it over and cook another 30 seconds.

6. Remove the tortilla and cover it with a clean kitchen towel. Continue rolling and cooking the tortillas, stacking them up and covering them as you go. Serve them warm. You can also reheat them briefly on a hot pan
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Dano on March 27, 2012, 08:43:52 PM
Meatloaf....everyon e has their own, but this one is pretty tasty!  (Got it from my New Mother in Law)

1 1/2 pounds of lean ground beef (chuck if you got it)
1 cup tomato juice
1 egg, beaten
1 package of dry onion soup mix
3/4 to 1 cup Quaker Oats, uncooked

Preheat oven to 350

Add all ingredients except the ground beef and mix thoroughly.  Let sit for about 5 minutes to allow the oats to absorb some of the goodness.
Add  ground beef and mix lightly, but thoroughly...best if done by hand!
Press into a loaf pan (we have one of those stoneware kind) and level it off well.  Ours is 8" x 4"  and it gets pretty close to the top.
Bake for 1 hour.
Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing.
Dive in!

(If you prefer it to be more moist use 3/4 cup of oats, if you like it a little drier use a full cup.  Also, the fat content of your ground beef plays into it too.  You may have to try this a couple times to get it the way you want it.)

IF you have any leftovers, they make the best meatloaf sandwich I've ever had!  But we usually eat it all, so if you want sandwiches the next day, double the recipe!
Title: Steak Sauce
Post by: Old Philosopher on April 04, 2012, 08:22:17 PM
Steak Sauce
1/2 cu water
1/3 cu raisins
2 Tbs ketchup
1 Tbs Worcestershire Sauce
2 Tbs Dijon mustard
2 Tbs wine vinegar
1/2 tsp onion powder
In a small bowl, pour boiling water over raisins and allow them to sit until they've plumped up.
Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until the raisins are thoroughly pureed.
Keep unused portion refrigerated.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 05, 2012, 07:28:36 PM
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 06, 2012, 06:43:15 PM
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  Sounds great,  one question,  are you mixing one cup of the tea with the sugar and baking soda,  or an additional third cup of water ?
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Quinn on April 07, 2012, 02:13:51 PM
Quinn's quick bread
(Irrrisshh brown bread)

1 Cup all purpose flour
2 Cups whole wheat flour
2 Tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 Tablespoon butter
1/4 Cup rolled oats  (regular or quick)
1 1/2 Cup plain or vanilla yogurt
milk

In large bowl, mix all-purpose flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder & salt.
Cut in butter until mix forms fine crumbs.
Stir in whole wheat flour and oats.
Add yogurt, stir gently. If too dry stir in milk slowly, about a Tablespoon at a time, until dough just holds together & is not 'sticky'.

Turn dough onto floured board & knead gently about 5 times to make a ball.
Set on lightly greased baking sheet.
Gently pat ball into about a 7 inch circle and with floured knife cut a large X in top of loaf.  Put a pat of butter into this X cut.
Bake at 375 degree oven  until browned, about 40 minutes.
Cool on rack.

Real easy and good with a hearty home-made soup.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 07, 2012, 03:33:47 PM
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  Sounds great,  one question,  are you mixing one cup of the tea with the sugar and baking soda,  or an additional third cup of water ?
3 cups water total
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 07, 2012, 08:24:45 PM
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  Sounds great,  one question,  are you mixing one cup of the tea with the sugar and baking soda,  or an additional third cup of water ?
3 cups water total


      Thanks,  that's a must try.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: jontok on April 09, 2012, 05:21:00 PM
Here goes... Pancakes my way...
(Our pancakes are thinner than yours btw.)
This is roughly how I make it.

Mix 4 eggs with about 1/2 cup sugar. Whisk for a bit.
Add about 1 Liter of milk
Stir in some flour until the batter is the consistency of a thick sauce.
Whisk until there are no more lumps.
Add about 1/2 cup of melted butter.
Continue whisking/stirring until everything is nice and lump free.

Put a little butter in a hot frying pan. add some batter and swirl it around so it covers the bottom of the frying pan ( you may want to experiment some here, to get the thickness you like. Should be something like a thin tortilla).
Flip the pancake.
fry until golden on other side. Serve.

These are good with sugar, jam (especially blueberry) or bacon.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 09, 2012, 06:32:56 PM
Here goes... Pancakes my way...
(Our pancakes are thinner than yours btw.)
This is roughly how I make it.

Mix 4 eggs with about 1/2 cup sugar. Whisk for a bit.
Add about 1 Liter of milk
Stir in some flour until the batter is the consistency of a thick sauce.
Whisk until there are no more lumps.
Add about 1/2 cup of melted butter.
Continue whisking/stirring until everything is nice and lump free.

Put a little butter in a hot frying pan. add some batter and swirl it around so it covers the bottom of the frying pan ( you may want to experiment some here, to get the thickness you like. Should be something like a thin tortilla).
Flip the pancake.
fry until golden on other side. Serve.

These are good with sugar, jam (especially blueberry) or bacon.

  In a Canuck's kitchen those are called Crepes,  our Pancakes are made with well beaten eggs, a little melted butter,  baking soda,  salt,  milk,  and enough sifted flour to make a semi-thick 'batter',  all the ingredients are added to a bowl and gently folded only enough to insure that everything is wet,  leaving the lumps intact.
  The batter is left to meld for about ten or fifteen minutes while the cast iron grill heats up to medium,  just before spooning the batter onto the grill in three inch rounds,  crushed up crispy bacon bits and the bacon drippings are folded into the batter,  when they are done they will be a light golden color and just under a half inch thick,  the only way a self respecting frenchman would serve them is either slathered with butter and sprinkled with sugar,  or with dark amber maple syrup.

  On the trail,  a couple of eggs,  pinch of salt,  Bisquick baking mix,  and the bacon and drippings are mixed with powdered milk and water,  and served as above.

  In a pinch,  Bisquick powdered pancake mix,  add water,  give it a shake and bake on a hot rock.   :fire2:  :banana:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: jontok on April 10, 2012, 03:09:00 PM
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 10, 2012, 09:37:30 PM
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D

  ROTFLMAO,  now that's funny.

  But on a serious note,  have you tried real pancakes,  you know,  good old American flap jacks ?

  Your recipe is actually within a hairs breath of being a Crepe recipe,  doing it that way would result in a very thin, very dense,  and very sweet pastry round.
  The reason we use baking powder and sift the flour is to insure that our pancakes turn out light and fluffy and have some levening rise,  and the reason that we only stir the batter enough to wet the mix instead of beating it into a paste is because over working the flour breaks down the gluten and makes the pancakes rubbery and dense,  the lumps are broken down by the cooking process.
  Here we like thick, light, and fluffy pancakes,  and I like mine best when they are grilled so the the top and bottom have a light crusty texture.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: jontok on April 12, 2012, 02:35:21 PM
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D

  ROTFLMAO,  now that's funny.

  But on a serious note,  have you tried real pancakes,  you know,  good old American flap jacks ?

  Your recipe is actually within a hairs breath of being a Crepe recipe,  doing it that way would result in a very thin, very dense,  and very sweet pastry round.
  The reason we use baking powder and sift the flour is to insure that our pancakes turn out light and fluffy and have some levening rise,  and the reason that we only stir the batter enough to wet the mix instead of beating it into a paste is because over working the flour breaks down the gluten and makes the pancakes rubbery and dense,  the lumps are broken down by the cooking process.
  Here we like thick, light, and fluffy pancakes,  and I like mine best when they are grilled so the the top and bottom have a light crusty texture.
You guys are still weird...  8)

I have actually tried Bisquick! :D
A guy I know in Texas sendt me a box a couple of years ago. Was interesting....

Ok, mustn't clutter up this thread with more chatter... On with the recipies! :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 12, 2012, 04:51:40 PM
Yeah, but you guys are weird.... :D :D :D

  ROTFLMAO,  now that's funny.

  But on a serious note,  have you tried real pancakes,  you know,  good old American flap jacks ?

  Your recipe is actually within a hairs breath of being a Crepe recipe,  doing it that way would result in a very thin, very dense,  and very sweet pastry round.
  The reason we use baking powder and sift the flour is to insure that our pancakes turn out light and fluffy and have some levening rise,  and the reason that we only stir the batter enough to wet the mix instead of beating it into a paste is because over working the flour breaks down the gluten and makes the pancakes rubbery and dense,  the lumps are broken down by the cooking process.
  Here we like thick, light, and fluffy pancakes,  and I like mine best when they are grilled so the the top and bottom have a light crusty texture.
You guys are still weird...  8)

I have actually tried Bisquick! :D
A guy I know in Texas sendt me a box a couple of years ago. Was interesting....

Ok, mustn't clutter up this thread with more chatter... On with the recipies! :)

Ah,  Bisquick,  wonderful stuff.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on April 13, 2012, 09:55:22 PM
Bean Soup and Tortellini...

1 cup 9 Bean-mix soaked over night
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 onion coarsely chopped
2 clove's of garlic chopped up small
4 cups chicken stock or broth
1 28oz can of either whole or diced tomato's
salt and pepper to taste
1 small bag of Tortellini

Saute celery/onions/ & garlic...approx 5-10 min
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001207.jpg)

add pre-soaked beans...and stir
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001208.jpg)

add 4 cups chicken stock...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001210.jpg)

add 28 oz can tomato's...in this case I used Roma's...put on lid and let simmer for 2 hrs, stir occasionally and break-up tomatoes...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001211.jpg)

after approx 2 hrs you can either eat or add some Tortellini and cook another 30 min...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001212.jpg)

When Tortellini is cooked, plate it up and enjoy...I didn't have any, but this recipe tastes really great if you add some freshly grated Parmesan on top just before serving.
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001214.jpg)

One batch of this cost $4.95 ( without the Tortellini ) and $9.20 with the Tortellini and made 5 very healthy servings, 2 of which were eaten immediately...Mmmm mmm good, and 3 were popped in the freezer for later.

If you try this recipe or have one of your own, let us know...
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 13, 2012, 10:00:15 PM
I would hurt a bowl or three of that but I cant get tortellini around here.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on April 14, 2012, 08:21:19 AM
I would hurt a bowl or three of that but I cant get tortellini around here.

I started off with the intention of just a bean soup but the Tortellini kept calling out to me, so I did what any self respecting ( starving cook ) would do, and threw them in the wok. I suppose any pasta could be added to help with the heartiness of it.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Dano on April 16, 2012, 04:58:45 AM
I would hurt a bowl or three of that but I cant get tortellini around here.

I started off with the intention of just a bean soup but the Tortellini kept calling out to me, so I did what any self respecting ( starving cook ) would do, and threw them in the wok. I suppose any pasta could be added to help with the heartiness of it.

I'm pretty sure we could do some major damage to a pot of that....MAN that looks great!!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: werewolf won on April 16, 2012, 07:15:09 AM
The New England Clam Boil
1 to 1-1/2 pounds soft shell (steamer) clams
1 pound Maine lobster
2 potatoes (Maine "white" or "New" aka "Red potato")
1 sweet Potato (or Yam)
1 or 2 ears corn
2 or 3 breakfast style sausages
2 hot dogs
6 inch length of spicy smoked style sausage
1 yellow onion
1/2 pound Cod fish

Multiply above portion by number of people.

Soak the clams in salted water for a half hour.

Wrap Cod in buttered parchment paper or brown paper

Put all into a deep pan, fill about one quarter deep with fresh water and bring to boil covered. Cook half hour to forty minutes or till potatoes are cooked.

Serve with small bowls of melted butter and cooking liquid.

The famous argument is always do the clams go on top of the vegetables and meats to steam or on the bottom to boil.   I've had both, I don't see the difference; but two  old Yankees might fight to the death over the right way :D.

The variation of this is the clam bake where the food is placed over red hot rocks that are covered in a thick layer of rock weed (seaweed); the food is also covered in weed, and the whole thing is covered in a canvas tarp and allowed to smoke and steam until cooked.  The finished product is strongly flavored with smoked seaweed.

Wolf



Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 17, 2012, 07:44:18 AM
Real Southern Sweet tea

5 regular lipton teabags
1 cup sugar
1/8 tsp baking soda(kills the tannin taste in the tea)

Bring 2 cups water to just a boil (when it starts to bubble git it off the heat pronto) pour over the tea bags and steep for 5 min squeeze them out & discard.
In a small sauce pan add the Sugar & 1 cup water & Baking soda bring to a boil & simmer 5 min.
Add the simple syrup to the tea to make a tea syrup
Pour the tea syrup into a gallon jug and fill it with water chill serve over ice

  I finely got around to making your sweet tea yesterday,  being an iced tea lover,  I thought it was great,  though I took the liberty of adding a lemon slice to the glass.
  The next time I make it i'm going to try adding a sliced up lemon to the simple sugar mixture while it's simmering and see what happens.
  I have to admit that I was surprised that the tea wasn't as week as I expected it to be when topped off in the gallon jug,  I think it sure beats the processed instant iced tea mixes,  thanks for the recipe.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 17, 2012, 08:03:06 AM
The New England Clam Boil
1 to 1-1/2 pounds soft shell (steamer) clams
1 pound Maine lobster
2 potatoes (Maine "white" or "New" aka "Red potato")
1 sweet Potato (or Yam)
1 or 2 ears corn
2 or 3 breakfast style sausages
2 hot dogs
6 inch length of spicy smoked style sausage
1 yellow onion
1/2 pound Cod fish

Multiply above portion by number of people.

Soak the clams in salted water for a half hour.

Wrap Cod in buttered parchment paper or brown paper

Put all into a deep pan, fill about one quarter deep with fresh water and bring to boil covered. Cook half hour to forty minutes or till potatoes are cooked.

Serve with small bowls of melted butter and cooking liquid.

The famous argument is always do the clams go on top of the vegetables and meats to steam or on the bottom to boil.   I've had both, I don't see the difference; but two  old Yankees might fight to the death over the right way :D.

The variation of this is the clam bake where the food is placed over red hot rocks that are covered in a thick layer of rock weed (seaweed); the food is also covered in weed, and the whole thing is covered in a canvas tarp and allowed to smoke and steam until cooked.  The finished product is strongly flavored with smoked seaweed.

Wolf

  Nothing finer than a good old fashioned down east clam bake,  hard to beat those that I've had at that farm in Rehobeth,  the best I ever had was at a small roadside place in Bar Harbor Maine,  they put the steamers, corn, lobster, sausage, and potatoes in a mesh bag,  tied off the end,  and dumped it in a concrete cauldron of boiling sea water and cooked it for just under twenty minutes,  everything was done just to perfection,  even the clam necks were tender,  and the salt in the sea water seasoned everything just right.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: MnSportsman on April 17, 2012, 08:28:06 AM
One of family favorites. You can add regular( non high temp) cheese, or nuts, whatever to the mix, or just make it plain. It's good stuff & quick. I also make cup-like crusts in a muffin tin/pan & fill with chili or stew, & then make lil caps for tops to make mini "pot-pies". If you take & roll it out flat & add ham & cheese & roll it up, you have a ham & cheese bread roll. You can do the same with taco meat & fixins/sauce & it is like a huge enchilada type bread roll.. All sorts of uses. I even use this to make biscuits, by placing dollops on a greased cookie sheet & cutting the baking time in half. {or so..check biscuits with a toothpick after 20 minutes. Insert toothpick & if it comes out clean & cleanly, your baking is done..}
 Great for Biscuits & Country Gravy for breakfast..
 ;)


Mouth watering, yet? Mine is... So here's a recipe for Beer Bread:


Ingredients:


3 cups flour  (http://www.food.com/library/flour-64)(sifted)

3 teaspoons baking powder  (http://www.food.com/library/baking-powder-6)(omit if using Self-Rising Flour)

1 teaspoon salt  (http://www.food.com/library/salt-359)(omit if using Self-Rising Flour)

1/4 cup sugar (http://www.food.com/library/sugar-139)

1 (12 ounce) can beer (http://www.food.com/library/beer-519)

1/2 cup melted butter  (http://www.food.com/library/butter-141)(1/4 cup will do just fine)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Mix dry ingredients and beer.   Pour into a greased loaf pan  Pour the melted butter over mixture.  Bake 1 hour, remove from pan and cool for at least 15 minutes. Some tips: This recipe makes a very hearty bread with a crunchy, buttery crust. If you prefer a softer crust (like a traditional bread) mix the butter into the batter instead of pouring it over the top.Sifting flour for bread recipes is a must-do. Most people just scoop the 1 cup measure in the flour canister and level it off. That compacts the flour and will turn your bread into a "hard biscuit" as some have described. That's because they aren't sifting their flour! If you do not have a sifter, use a spoon to spoon the flour into the 1 cup measure. Try it once the "correct" way and you will see an amazing difference in the end product.

You can also use Non alcoholic beverages & even stale 7-up or sprite. I have done it & it worked well.

{But you may want to add a bit of yeast.. a packet of Dry Active Yeast or 2 teaspoons of Bread (Machine) Yeast so that you get a proper rise. I've not used yeast myself, but it should work just fine.}


Now I suppose a "Country Gravy recipe should show up here soon, eh?
 ;)

I hope you enjoy this, & have fun with it we do!
 :D

Edit note: I have used this same recipe at home for years, but I copied & pasted one here that is just like it to save time in typing. I also added the yeast tip which I have not tried.
 :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 17, 2012, 09:16:30 AM
  More from Southern New England kitchens.
       
                                         Dynamites
                                         _________

       * 2- pounds of ground chuck.
       * 5- large green bell peppers.
       * 4- large yellow or white onions.
       * 2- links of sweet Italian sausage.
       * 1- 28oz. can of diced tomatoes.
       * 1-  small can of tomato paste.
       * 1- tbsp. of minced garlic.
       * 1- tbsp. of Italian seasoning.
       * 1- tsp. red pepper flakes.
       * 2- tbsp. wostershire sauce.
       * Salt & Pepper to taste.
       * 12- sub rolls.
       
    * Cut the bell peppers in half lengthways,  then slice them crossways to 1/4" slices.
    * Peel the onions and slice them the same as the peppers.
    * In a large stock pot add a couple of tbsp. of butter and turn the stove to mediom heat to melt the butter,  then add the sliced peppers and onions in layers,  they should about fill the pot,  add a pinch of salt and pepper and start to sweat the veggies.
    * Once they start to sweat and shed some of their liquid,  add the can of diced tomatoes and tomato paste,  the Italian seasonings,  and the red pepper flakes, and continue to cook down the peppers and onions.
    * In a separate pan,
sautee the ground chuck seasoned with salt and pepper until cooked through and broken up into small bits (riced),  set aside.
    * When the peppers and onions are starting to get tender add the meat and the worcestershire sauce and the sliced sausage,  cover,  turn down the heat to a slow simmer and finish cooking until the peppers and onions are cooked but a little eldente.

   You will end up with a dish that resembles a loose sloppy joe's type mixture.

  Now,  slice the sub rolls lengthways across the top (not the sides) and using a slotted spoon, ladel the mix into the sub rolls,  serve with potato chips,  cold beer,  and plenty of paper towels.
  Have salt, pepper, and hot sauce available for those who need to adjust for individual tastes.

  You really have to try this to appreciate this treat,  it has become a staple meal and pure comfort food for folks along the southern MA./northern RI. border for most of the last century,  and with good cause.

  The above recipe will make 24 subs,  I freeze the left overs when I have some,  but that rarwly happens,  I usually make this on weekends when the kids gather to vist,  I usually buy four packages of sub rolls (24),  and there's not much left when they leave.   
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on April 17, 2012, 10:52:21 AM
Some tasty soundin recipes here folks, thanks for all the contributions. 8)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on April 17, 2012, 10:49:42 PM
DOROTHY BELDIN'S FISH BATTER RECIPE


Dean Beldin was an old catfisherman that I used to work with and I helped him run his throw lines when he needed the help.  He ate big hunks of cold flathead and channel cat out of his old battered and bent black lunchbox EVERY day for lunch break.  I asked him if he ever got tired of catfish for lunch every day.   Being a man of few words, he just reached down into his lunchbox and handed me a wax paper wrapped piece that his wife Dorothy fried up that morning before he left for work.  It was then that I learned why he never tired of his everyday fare.   This stuff is THE BEST!

2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter

Dry the fish
Mix enough water into the combined dry ingredients to make a heavy paste
Dip fish pieces in paste and shake off excess
Place in 365-375 degree deep fat and fry until pieces float and they are golden brown
Remove fry basket from fryer and drain for a moment, then dump out onto an issue of the daily newspaper with an opened brown paper grocery bag on top. 

Simple, but once you try it I'm sure you'll understand why ol' Dean ate the same thing every day, as long as I knew him :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 18, 2012, 05:39:17 AM
 Throw in some french fries,  cold beer,  and a little malt vinagar and I'll be there Wolfy.  :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: werewolf won on April 18, 2012, 08:29:45 AM
Another New England Favorite

Johnny Cakes

Ingredients:

1 cup white cornmeal
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup water
1/2 cup milk
Grease for pan  (Bacon drippings are great)

Preparation:

1. Mix cornmeal and salt.

2. Bring water to a rapid boil; remove from heat.

3. Add boiling waterto the cornmeal while stirring constantly. 

4. Add milk.

5.  Heat and grease a fry pan and add batter in good sized spoonfulls.  Flatten the batter to a thickness of approximately 1/4 inch. Fry until golden brown, turn, and brown on the other side.

Serve hot with butter, maple syrup,  applesauce or other fruit jellies etc.

Enjoy

Wolf

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 18, 2012, 10:10:05 AM
One of the things that I have always enjoyed is a piece of  rich moist chocolate cake. The best I ever ate is an old recipe That goes by a few different monikers, some call it Wacky cake, Depression Cake, I just call it the best Chocolate cake I ever ate. Growing up my Granny would make this for us kids. Anyway heres the recipe.

Wacky Cake
3 c. flour
1/2 c. cocoa
1 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. vinegar
2 c cold black coffee
2 c. white sugar
2 tsp. soda
2/3 c. salad oil (Crisco)
2 tsp. vanilla

Mix all ingredients until well blended. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes.

Easy Icing

Ingredients

    3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips
    3 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon light corn syrup
    1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

    In a double boiler over hot, but not boiling water, combine chocolate chips, butter, and corn syrup. Stir until chips are melted and mixture is smooth, then add vanilla. Pour over cooled cake.

* I make this in a 1 qrt measure cup in the Micro wave in 30 sec intervals stirring in between until it is smooth
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on April 18, 2012, 03:38:44 PM
We make almost the exact same cake, Smoke......I'm thoroughly convinced it's the coffee (the stronger, the better) that makes it as good as it is.  Must intensify the cocoa or something :-\
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on April 18, 2012, 11:42:27 PM
I'm not very experienced at baking. But that recipe seems simple and easy to try. But, doesn't it need an egg?
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 19, 2012, 08:00:54 AM
Nope, no eggs!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 19, 2012, 09:45:20 AM
Nope, no eggs!

  Now I know I have to try this.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on April 19, 2012, 02:40:07 PM
Gonna make this up today, couldn't get chicken at the price I wanted so I'm going to substitute some turkey...Thanks to Junior Doughty for the original recipe at ... http://www.castbullet.com/

Here is the altered zammer version...

Two... Turkey breasts
One... 10oz can cream of chicken soup
Salt and Pepper to season
5 large tortilla's ( cut up to 1x 1.5 " pieces )

Two Turkey breasts seasoned and boiled for 45min - 1 hr...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001225.jpg)

After boiling up the turkey I removed the meat and put aside into a bowl, then added 16oz of water to wok and added the can of soup as well as a little more salt and pepper...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001226.jpg)

Cut your tortillas into pieces. You can stack and cut, but then you have to seperate when adding to the pot, whatever works best...simmer for 30 min
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001227.jpg)

Tortillas all added to wok...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001228.jpg)

Two turkey breasts de-boned and added to wok, seemed just about right...simmer for 1 hr, I added about another 8oz of water halfway thru to keep it from becoming too thick...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001230.jpg)

Finished cooking...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001231.jpg)

Into a bowl it goes...smells great, but have not tasted yet...back in a bit with my yay or nay...
(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/m_WP_001232.jpg)

This recipe is a total yay! was a little worried it might turn out kinda pasty, but it was much better than I had hoped for. Will def make this one again...Got 4 hearty bowls full.

$4.27 for the turkey
$1.89 can of cream of chicken soup
$1.00 for the tortillas

$7.16  total or $1.79 per hearty bowl of goodness.


Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 20, 2012, 07:30:29 PM
Being  Texan I like my food with a little Spark. I admit I'm a Chili head and I like a good hot sauce. I've tried many but few are woth the effort to lift the bottle. To me it must have a fruity pepper flavor( By fruity I mean the flavor of the pepper must be front & center not fruit added to the sauce) Vinegarshould be an under tone.  What folllows is arecipe for one of the best suaces I have ever used.If you like Chuala toll love this I make 1 batch a month, so yeah I like it.
(http://i968.photobucket.com/albums/ae164/Bludawg51/DSCN0629.jpg)
Chile de Arbol Hot Sauce

Use to sprinkle on tacos, tostadas or other snacks. You can also dash some into pozole, menudo or other soups. It lasts indefinitely. It's very close to Chuala sauce, but a lot better.

50 to 60 dried chiles de arbol
1 1/2 tablespoons sesame seeds
2 tablespoons shelled pumpkin seeds
1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds or 1/4 teaspoon ground
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
2 cloves
1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano
1 scant teaspoon salt
2 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
3/4 cup cider vinegar

Stem the chiles, then roll them between your thumb and fingers, pressing gently to loosen the seeds inside. Break in half, shake out as many seeds as possible, then place in a blender jar.

Heat an ungreased skillet over medium-low heat. Stir the sesame seeds for several minutes until they brown and pop; scoop into the blender jar. Add pumpkin seeds to the skillet. When the first one pops, stir constantly for several minutes until all are golden and have popped up into a round shape.

Pulverize the cumin, allspice and cloves in a mortar or spice grinder, then add to the blender along with the oregano, salt, garlic and vinegar. Blend for several minutes until the mixture is orange-red and feels smooth when a drop is rubbed between your fingers. Strain through a sieve, working the solids back and forth and pressing them firmly. Stir in 3/4 cup water, then pour into a bottle, cover and let stand for 24 hours before serving
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on April 20, 2012, 07:51:53 PM
Great description on how to make that sauce up Smokewalker, thanks
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Gryphon on April 20, 2012, 09:52:25 PM
Pumpkin seeds eh?  Do they add that much to the sauce?  With the cloves, sesame and pumpkin seeds and allspice, it should be kind of sweet too without that sugary taste.  Interesting.

Lacking seeds but having everything else available, I'll have to make some.  Maybe a hit of cilantro too...(in the second batch.  First try must be pure).

Now by 2 cloves garlic, is that 2 sections or two bulbs?  (yes, I would use two bulbs...I rarely use just a clove or three!)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 20, 2012, 10:40:44 PM
It is 2 cloves of garlic. I really like garlic but 2 heads would be over kill. The pumpkin seeds do 2 things they add a sweet nuttiness and help to thicken the sauce. 
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 20, 2012, 10:54:19 PM
Here's another Hot sauce I keep in the ice box it is called FIREWATER the recipe comes from the Marlboro  miles cook book it has great flavor heat level is dependent o the peppers you use to make it. Jalapenos & Serranos give it a nice Green chili flavor.

Fire Water:(Hot sauce)

4 or 5 red or green chili pepper
2 large cloves garlic
1 sprig fresh oregano
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp cumin seed
1 tsp salt
2 cups boiling water
Dried red pepper flakes, optional

Wash and cut slits in chili peppers, no need to remove seeds. Peel and slice garlic.

Put oregano, bay leaf and cumin seed into a clean jar. Add chili peppers, garlic and salt; pour boiling water over. Cover and let stand overnight.

Strain out solids; pour Fire Water into a glass bottle, adding a few dried pepper flakes, if desired.

Refrigerate between uses.

Drizzle fire Water over cooked chicken or meat; sprinkle over cooked vegetables. Dip crusty bread into it. Add to soups and stews.

Makes about 2 cups
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 22, 2012, 07:12:46 PM
Here's another Hot sauce I keep in the ice box it is called FIREWATER the recipe comes from the Marlboro  miles cook book it has great flavor heat level is dependent o the peppers you use to make it. Jalapenos & Serranos give it a nice Green chili flavor.

Fire Water:(Hot sauce)

4 or 5 red or green chili pepper
2 large cloves garlic
1 sprig fresh oregano
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp cumin seed
1 tsp salt
2 cups boiling water
Dried red pepper flakes, optional

Wash and cut slits in chili peppers, no need to remove seeds. Peel and slice garlic.

Put oregano, bay leaf and cumin seed into a clean jar. Add chili peppers, garlic and salt; pour boiling water over. Cover and let stand overnight.

Strain out solids; pour Fire Water into a glass bottle, adding a few dried pepper flakes, if desired.

Refrigerate between uses.

Drizzle fire Water over cooked chicken or meat; sprinkle over cooked vegetables. Dip crusty bread into it. Add to soups and stews.

Makes about 2 cups

  Smoke,  would dried peppers work,  I've got a bunch of several types of hot red chilly and Anahiem peppers that have been drying since last season ?
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on April 24, 2012, 06:31:19 PM
Here's another Hot sauce I keep in the ice box it is called FIREWATER the recipe comes from the Marlboro  miles cook book it has great flavor heat level is dependent o the peppers you use to make it. Jalapenos & Serranos give it a nice Green chili flavor.

Fire Water:(Hot sauce)

4 or 5 red or green chili pepper
2 large cloves garlic
1 sprig fresh oregano
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp cumin seed
1 tsp salt
2 cups boiling water
Dried red pepper flakes, optional

Wash and cut slits in chili peppers, no need to remove seeds. Peel and slice garlic.

Put oregano, bay leaf and cumin seed into a clean jar. Add chili peppers, garlic and salt; pour boiling water over. Cover and let stand overnight.

Strain out solids; pour Fire Water into a glass bottle, adding a few dried pepper flakes, if desired.

Refrigerate between uses.

Drizzle fire Water over cooked chicken or meat; sprinkle over cooked vegetables. Dip crusty bread into it. Add to soups and stews.

Makes about 2 cups

  Smoke,  would dried peppers work,  I've got a bunch of several types of hot red chilly and Anahiem peppers that have been drying since last season ?
I have never tried dried pods in this sauce, but from experience in re-hydrating them  to make Enchilada sauce the water can get quite bitter :puke: something to do with the skins I wouldn't do it. 
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on April 25, 2012, 12:04:10 PM
Here's another Hot sauce I keep in the ice box it is called FIREWATER the recipe comes from the Marlboro  miles cook book it has great flavor heat level is dependent o the peppers you use to make it. Jalapenos & Serranos give it a nice Green chili flavor.

Fire Water:(Hot sauce)
4 or 5 red or green chili pepper
2 large cloves garlic
1 sprig fresh oregano
1 bay leaf
1/2 tsp cumin seed
1 tsp salt
2 cups boiling water
Dried red pepper flakes, optional

Wash and cut slits in chili peppers, no need to remove seeds. Peel and slice garlic.

Put oregano, bay leaf and cumin seed into a clean jar. Add chili peppers, garlic and salt; pour boiling water over. Cover and let stand overnight.

Strain out solids; pour Fire Water into a glass bottle, adding a few dried pepper flakes, if desired.

Refrigerate between uses.

Drizzle fire Water over cooked chicken or meat; sprinkle over cooked vegetables. Dip crusty bread into it. Add to soups and stews.

Makes about 2 cups

  Smoke,  would dried peppers work,  I've got a bunch of several types of hot red chilly and Anahiem peppers that have been drying since last season ?
I have never tried dried pods in this sauce, but from experience in re-hydrating them  to make Enchilada sauce the water can get quite bitter :puke: something to do with the skins I wouldn't do it.

  Thanks,  I'll wait,  there's a Whole Foods store nearby where I get out to to pick up hard to get stuff at the super market,  I'll get some fresh peppers there and give your recipe a try.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: easy_rider75 on April 25, 2012, 08:42:55 PM
I have not tried these  but ran across them on another site sounds about perfection so who's game to try them? :D


Bacon Cookies with Maple Icing
Adapted from barbaricgulp.com

4 slices thick-cut, lean bacon, chopped
2 cups flour
1 stick butter, cut into pieces and softened
1 large egg
3 tablespoons heavy cream

At home
Fry bacon until crisp, then dry on paper towels. In a bowl, combine flour, butter, egg, and cream and mix until well-blended. Add the bacon and knead until dough is soft and bacon is evenly distributed. Roll the dough into one or two 1.5-inch-thick logs. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill until firm (about two hours).

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut dough into 1/4-inch-thick slices and place on a lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake 12-15 minutes, until cookies are lightly browned. Transfer to a rack to cool.

Maple Icing
Combine about 1/2 cup of powd
bikebum1975: Maple Icing
Combine about 1/2 cup of powdered sugar with about 3 tablespoons real maple syrup (experiment until you get the right consistency). Spread over cookies when they're completely cool
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on May 02, 2012, 08:14:55 AM
  This isn't one of those fantastic gormet recipes that resemble a dish from your favorite eatery,  but it's good old comfort food easily made in camp.

  I'm a potato salad addict,  actually I love spuds no matter how they're fixed, but I can make a meal out of 'tater salad and potato chips.
  Most forays into the woods for me include potatoes of some kind,  if i'm only going for the day i'll sometimes take a can of sliced potatoes, a stalk of celery, and a couple of skallions or small green onions,  and a small container of premixed mayo w/a dab of dejon mustard.
  When it's time to eat,  just slice the celery and onion into thin slices, open and drain the potatoes,  mix it in a small bowl or your mess kit plate and stir in the mayo,  add salt and pepper to taste and enjoy.
  If I'm planning on 'tater salad I usually pack a small can of Pringles originals to go with the salad,  mm mm good.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: werewolf won on May 02, 2012, 08:24:38 AM
  This isn't one of those fantastic gormet recipes that resemble a dish from your favorite eatery,  but it's good old comfort food easily made in camp.

  I'm a potato salad addict,  actually I love spuds no matter how they're fixed, but I can make a meal out of 'tater salad and potato chips.
  Most forays into the woods for me include potatoes of some kind,  if i'm only going for the day i'll sometimes take a can of sliced potatoes, a stalk of celery, and a couple of skallions or small green onions,  and a small container of premixed mayo w/a dab of dejon mustard.
  When it's time to eat,  just slice the celery and onion into thin slices, open and drain the potatoes,  mix it in a small bowl or your mess kit plate and stir in the mayo,  add salt and pepper to taste and enjoy.
  If I'm planning on 'tater salad I usually pack a small can of Pringles originals to go with the salad,  mm mm good.

Try this variation sometime.  Cook the potatoes with a couple of tablespoons of pickling spices.  When the taters are tender remove from heat drain and add a dressing of red wine vinaigrette type dressing.  Serve hot or cold.  Being deathly allergic to mayo this is how I make my potato salad.

Wolf
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on May 02, 2012, 08:38:25 AM
  This isn't one of those fantastic gormet recipes that resemble a dish from your favorite eatery,  but it's good old comfort food easily made in camp.

  I'm a potato salad addict,  actually I love spuds no matter how they're fixed, but I can make a meal out of 'tater salad and potato chips.
  Most forays into the woods for me include potatoes of some kind,  if i'm only going for the day i'll sometimes take a can of sliced potatoes, a stalk of celery, and a couple of skallions or small green onions,  and a small container of premixed mayo w/a dab of dejon mustard.
  When it's time to eat,  just slice the celery and onion into thin slices, open and drain the potatoes,  mix it in a small bowl or your mess kit plate and stir in the mayo,  add salt and pepper to taste and enjoy.
  If I'm planning on 'tater salad I usually pack a small can of Pringles originals to go with the salad,  mm mm good.

Try this variation sometime.  Cook the potatoes with a couple of tablespoons of pickling spices.  When the taters are tender remove from heat drain and add a dressing of red wine vinaigrette type dressing.  Serve hot or cold.  Being deathly allergic to mayo this is how I make my potato salad.

Wolf

  Your recipe sounds similar to one that a friends wife makes,  she's from Germany and says that's how they enjoy it there,  usually served warm just above room temp.
  I didn't know you were allergic to mayo,  it's a good thing to know since we share pot luck meals at the meets.
  With mayo being made from eggs and oil, what do you think causes the problem,  the eggs or the oil,  or is it when they are combined ?
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: werewolf won on May 02, 2012, 09:48:31 AM
I do not know!  I assume that homemade mayo would not bother me as neither eggs or oils bother me, but I?m not trying my luck.  I assume factory brands have some preservative, or combination of ingredients. 
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on May 02, 2012, 08:01:19 PM
We put lots of boiled eggs in our tater salad, too 8)
Title: Doughnut S'mores
Post by: WoodsWoman on May 04, 2012, 09:08:16 PM
Doughnut S'Mores recipe

12 plain cake doughnuts
Marshmallow Creme
Chocolate candy bars

Slice the doughnut in half horizontally. Spread about a tablespoon of Marshmallow Creme on half of each doughnut. Top with chocolate candy bar pieces. Top with the other doughnut half. Wrap in foil or put in foil pan and put on fire just until chocolate melts.

12 servings

NOTE:  I like this recipe because you can just bring enough for yourself or how many are with you. :)
Just scoop marshmellow creme into a baggy for smaller amounts.  Cut corner of the bag and squease onto the doughnut.


WW.


Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on May 31, 2012, 01:09:59 PM
  More skillet Journey Cakes.

 * Equal parts of Baking Mix and Stone Ground Corn Meal.
 * Double Acting Baking Powder.
 * Salt
 * Butter,  oil, or Bacon Grease for frying.
 * Milk.
 * sugar
 
  For four large individual cakes.
 
  * 1/2 cup of baking mix (Bisquick)
  * 1/2 cup of yellow or white Stone Ground Corn Meal.
  * 2- teaspoons of double acting baking powder.
  * 1/2 teaspoon of salt 
  * 1/2 cup of milk (or enough to make a thick batter).
  * 1/4 cup of sugar.

  * Mix all the ingredients in a med bowl and let set for 10 minutes.
  * Heat oil or bacon grease in a heavy skillet.
  * spoon in the batter and fry until golden brown,  turn over and finish frying until done.
 
  Enjoy as is,  or top with sprinkled sugar,  butter,  syrup,  apple sauce,  or fruit preserve.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on June 05, 2012, 04:58:21 PM
One of the things that I have always enjoyed is a piece of  rich moist chocolate cake. The best I ever ate is an old recipe That goes by a few different monikers, some call it Wacky cake, Depression Cake, I just call it the best Chocolate cake I ever ate. Growing up my Granny would make this for us kids. Anyway heres the recipe.

Wacky Cake
3 c. flour
1/2 c. cocoa
1 tsp. salt
2 tbsp. vinegar
2 c cold black coffee
2 c. white sugar
2 tsp. soda
2/3 c. salad oil (Crisco)
2 tsp. vanilla

Mix all ingredients until well blended. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes.

Easy Icing

Ingredients

    3/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips
    3 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon light corn syrup
    1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

    In a double boiler over hot, but not boiling water, combine chocolate chips, butter, and corn syrup. Stir until chips are melted and mixture is smooth, then add vanilla. Pour over cooled cake.

* I make this in a 1 qrt measure cup in the Micro wave in 30 sec intervals stirring in between until it is smooth

   Hey Smoke,  I've made this cake again for the second time and it is great,  far better than traditional box cakes,  this time I cut the recipe in half,  the full recipe makes a lot of cake,  and I added a bit more cocoa,  thanks for the recipe.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on June 05, 2012, 07:26:53 PM
Your certainly welcome Moe just don't blame me wen ya need to punch a new hole it the old belt ;D
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on June 06, 2012, 10:09:50 PM
Just whipped this up on a whim and it turned out so good I had to share!

1 can whole kernel corn, drained
1 can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 can "Mexican" diced tomatoes*
Salt
Black pepper
Cumin
Onion Powder
Hot Sauce

Drain and rinse the black beans, and drain the corn. Mix in a large mixing bowl with the diced tomatoes. Add cumin, salt, pepper, onion powder and hot sauce to taste. I used approximately 1/2tsp. cumin, 1/4tsp onion powder, 1/4tsp black pepper, and 1/2tsp. salt. Those are good starting figures, buut go easy on them at first, adjusting the flavor until you like it.

*Mexican diced tomatoes

For this recipe I used "Western Family" brand diced tomatoes with lime juice and cilantro. It is relatively mild. You may use RoTel, but that is significantly hotter and you might not need any hot sauce if you use the RoTel. Make sure to taste it every time you add more of an ingredient.


This turned out really good for just popping open 3 cans and it made a lot of salsa, almost filling a quart size container. Took me about 10 minutes from thinking of it, to scooping it onto my first chip. The corn adds a sweetness, and the cumin and beans combine to give it a great, hearty taste. You could add chipotle powder if you like to give it a smoky flavor, but do that before adding the hot sauce.
Title: Dry Rub
Post by: Gryphon on June 13, 2012, 10:30:31 AM
One of my rubs.  This is a simple one that works great on beef destined for the smoker.

Dry rub:
1 part kosher salt
1 part paprika
1 part onion powder
1 part (mixed half n half) garlic powder and granulated garlic
1 1/2 parts chilie powder (play with this one: dark, light, chipotle, etc.)
1/2 part black pepper
1/2 part mustard powder


I don't use sugar in this one.  If you want it sweeter for ribs or such, mix in 1 1/2 parts brown sugar.
Title: Tater salad
Post by: Gryphon on June 13, 2012, 10:41:11 AM
I love me a good tater salad.  I make it at least a day before and let it meld flavors in the fridge.  I like mine with stuff.  It's just as good with only taters if you like it like that too.


Dice the taters and boil in salt water to tender.
Diced veg:  I use about a cup of veg total to two cups of potato.
red onion
celery
one medium seeded jalapeno
4-6 diced boiled eggs

1:1 olive oil mayo and sour cream
Squirt of mustard to taste.  I like mustard so I use a lot.  Good mustard makes the difference.  I like French's yellow. 

I dump the dressing ingredients right on the taters and mix until it's covered how I like it.  Seems to be about two cups of goo for six decent spuds.  Your results may vary.  Mix it how you like.

A little salt, pepper, paprika and celery salt can tweak the flavor, but I usually don't add anything to this one myself.

And no, there is no heat from the jalapeno, just a little crunch and an occasional bit of fruity chile flavor.  The mayo and sour cream totally kill any heat a single, seeded chile could think of generating.

Oh yeah...it's healthier because of the olive oil mayo and sour cream, so you can eat twice as much! ~LOL~
Title: Stuffed Chicken Breasts
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 19, 2012, 11:18:52 AM
As you know, I'm not really into detailed recipes. My wife cooks with "a pinch of this", "a dab of that", or "a small handful" measurements.  So most of my recipes include only ingredients, and procedures.

Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Enough halved chicken breasts to feed your guests (1/4 breast will be a serving)
Thin sliced deli ham, prosciutto, or similar
Mozzarella cheese (grated or sliced)
Feta cheese (could use bleu cheese, or similar)
Prepared mustard (Dijon is best)
Fresh spinach leaves, or other favorite greens
Salt
Pepper
Breading (bread, panko, cornflakes, crackers...your choice)
Egg wash (approx. 3 eggs + Tbs water lightly whipped)
Flour

With a sharp slender knife (boning, fillet) cut pockets in the breast halves starting at the heavy end.
Lay out your ham slices and spread a thin layer of mustard on them. Lay your spinach leaves on top if this.  Lay a thin slice (or sprinkle the grated) of Mozzarella on top of the leaves, and sprinkle a few crumbles of the feta cheese on that.

Roll up the ham slices to hold everything together. Stuff one ham roll inside the pockets you cut in the breasts. Place in the refrigerator to chill thoroughly.

When chilled, dredge each breast in the flour, egg wash and breading. Double bread them if you like. Return to the refrigerator for another hour, or so to cool, and set up. This keeps the cheese from oozing out during cooking.

Place the breasts in a shallow casserole dish, and place in pre-heated 450o oven for about 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 400o and bake for another 15-20 minutes until the breading is golden brown.

Cut each breast in half crosswise, and serve with rice, or other condiments.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Smokewalker on June 19, 2012, 03:00:26 PM
This is an Easy Camp meal with little to know cleanup you can even do it in a Canteen cup 8)

Tin Can Campfire Meal


Hamburger patty -- 1/4 to 1/3 pound
Potato -- 4 good chunks
Carrot -- 3 good chunks
Onion -- 1 thick slice
Tomato -- 2 thick slices
Corn on the cob -- 1 4-inch piece
Butter or oil -- 1 tablespoon
Salt and pepper -- to taste
Place the ingredients into the can, layered as they are listed, starting with the hamburger. Cover the can tightly with aluminum foil and place into your cooler. You're done for now!
To cook the meal, place the can in a medium hot area of your campfire and let it cook for about 45 minutes.
Slide a fork down the inside of the can into one of the potato chunks to see if it is done. If the potato is done, everything is done.
Title: Looed beef
Post by: Old Philosopher on June 19, 2012, 10:37:34 PM
Looing sauce can be used with any type of meat. If you loo fish, don't save the left-overs (not that there are going to be any, though).
I can't rave enough about the tenderness, and flavor imparted to even the toughest meat. I love beef roasts done this way, and it's perfect for wild game of all sorts.

Looing Sauce

4 cu water
2 cu soy sauce (1 light, 1 dark)
1/4 cu sugar
1/2 cup rice wine, or dry sherry
3 sclices fresh ginger

Simmer the meat/fowl in the sauce until tender. By tender, I mean you can shred it with a pair of forks.
Serve the beef as you would any pot roast. Normally dry rabbit, or pheasant are amazing. Or...shred the meat for tortilla wraps, or other dishes.

Title: Re: Looed beef
Post by: Moe M. on June 20, 2012, 07:55:32 AM
Looing sauce can be used with any type of meat. If you loo fish, don't save the left-overs (not that there are going to be any, though).
I can't rave enough about the tenderness, and flavor imparted to even the toughest meat. I love beef roasts done this way, and it's perfect for wild game of all sorts.

Looing Sauce

4 cu water
2 cu soy sauce (1 light, 1 dark)
1/4 cu sugar
1/2 cup rice wine, or dry sherry
3 sclices fresh ginger

Simmer the meat/fowl in the sauce until tender. By tender, I mean you can shred it with a pair of forks.
Serve the beef as you would any pot roast. Normally dry rabbit, or pheasant are amazing. Or...shred the meat for tortilla wraps, or other dishes.

  Sounds great,  how about some quick Oriental rice to go with that Looed pot roast.

      * 1-1/2 cups of long grain white rice.
      * 2 tbsp. of Soy Sauce.
      * 2 tbsp. of fresh minced ginger.
      * 2 tbsp. of fresh minced garlic.
      * 1/2 cup of sliced celery.
      * 1/2 cup of diced onion.
      * 1/2 cup of diced bell peppers.
      * 1/4 cup of minced carrots.
      * 2 tbsp. butter.
      * 3-cups of chicken stock.  (granulated bullion is ok )
      * salt & pepper to taste.

      + 1/2- cup of green onion sliced to about 1/2" lengths.
      + 1- egg
      + 1/4 cup of green peas,  (fresh or frozen)

    Brown the rice in a dry skillet.
    Place all the ingredients except for the rice and the last three items in a sauce pan or rice cooker and bring to a simmer, 
    Now add the rice,  cook on simmer covered for twenty minutes.

    While it's simmering add a little water to the egg (1- tbsp.) and scramble the egg cooking it as flat as possible,  set aside to cool.

    After the rice is finished,  uncover and fluff it up, add the green onion, peas, and chopped egg to the rice and stir,  let it set covered for a few minutes, stir again and serve.

     It sounds like a lot of work when explaining it,  but only takes ten minutes of prep total,  and the twenty five minutes of total cooking time.
     
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Gryphon on June 30, 2012, 06:57:41 PM
Beans.
cup or so dry white beans.  Soak overnight in plain water.  Add water as needed to keep them covered.  Use a bigger bowl than you think you will need...they grow.

Saute together:
diced white onion
diced jalapeno (seeded)
diced tomato
salt and pepper

I used a whole smoked jalapeno too.  Nice smoky flavor with a touch of heat.  Red pepper flakes or not seeding one jalapeno will suffice as well.  Try a tsp of liquid smoke if needed towards the end.

Drain beans and add.  Add water or stock of choice to cover beans.  Bring to boil then set to simmer covered for about a half hour.

Remove lid and check the beans.  When they are about done (tender enough to eat) remove the lid and reduce the liquid off.

Lower heat when the liquid is about half as much as the beans.  Add about a cup of ketchup of choice (I like Hunts without HFCS), about 1/4 cup worchestershire sauce (I use the thick stuff) and a couple tablespoons of bbq sauce of choice.  I usually add a small can of tomato paste, but didn't have any this time.  Came out good, if not better.  Adjust with ketchup and other sauces as needed.

Simmer a few minutes more and stir well.  They'll be better tomorrow.

(http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/dd100/gryphonblade/2012-06-30_17-19-29_702.jpg)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on July 04, 2012, 09:23:14 AM
Your certainly welcome Moe just don't blame me wen ya need to punch a new hole it the old belt ;D

  I know this might be getting old,  but I got to thank you again,  I cut the recipe in half again except for the cocoa powder (I used 1/2 a cup),  this time I used it to make cup cakes,  the halved recipe made 12 perfect sized cup cakes,  I topped them off with a little choc. frosting,  they are a lot better than store bought Hostess cup cakes

 I guess I don't have to tell you that the wife and I are partial to chocolate cake.   :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on July 17, 2012, 08:29:58 AM
  Seems like this section is dying here,  time to bump it up a little.

   My wife's favorite chicken dish.

   Boneless, skinless chicken breast (however many you want)
   Seasoned salt  (course salt w/garlic added)
   Black pepper
   Hidden Valley Ranch  (powdered salad dressing)
   Emeril's Essence  or  Cajun checken rub
   Bag of Garlic & Butter croutons or Ceaser flavored croutons  (crushed in food processor  to the consistency of fine breadcrumbs )
   Butter and light olive or veggy oil.

  *  Dust chicken breast with seasoned salt,  pepper,  Emeril's,  and Ranch powder and rub it in

  *  Coat the Breasts with crushed crouton mix

  *  Pan fry the seasoned and coated breasts in butter & oil mix over moderate heat until done

  Serve with Rice Pilaf  and candied carrots (carrots steamed eldenti and coated with butter and honey and lightly salted),  and a pat of cranberry sauce.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on July 19, 2012, 12:46:31 PM
  Seems like this section is dying here,  time to bump it up a little.

 i think the main problem with a general recipe section is the fact it's so general. When it was a new and current topic folks checked back in to see whats up, but after a while it gets old and folks look for newer topics to pique their interest. If it was categorized into different types of recipes then folks could look up "chicken dishes" for example and either retrieve the info for their own use or add their review of the recipe.

Archiving info, whether this topic or knives or whatever is one of the more difficult tasks for a forum, another problem is how much time/space should be devoted to organizing topics which are "off-topic" to the Forum's main agenda...enough of my blabbering on...sounds like a tasty recipe Moe  :D
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on July 19, 2012, 01:31:05 PM
  Seems like this section is dying here,  time to bump it up a little.

 i think the main problem with a general recipe section is the fact it's so general. When it was a new and current topic folks checked back in to see whats up, but after a while it gets old and folks look for newer topics to pique their interest. If it was categorized into different types of recipes then folks could look up "chicken dishes" for example and either retrieve the info for their own use or add their review of the recipe.

Archiving info, whether this topic or knives or whatever is one of the more difficult tasks for a forum, another problem is how much time/space should be devoted to organizing topics which are "off-topic" to the Forum's main agenda...enough of my blabbering on...sounds like a tasty recipe Moe  :D
I believe (perhaps mistakenly) that the purpose of this thread was to just post recipes without discussing them. Often these recipes appeared elsewhere (Food and Cooking?) in threads that told the story of their creation, like "What's for dinner?". The idea was to consolidate recipes in one thread so people could find  a recipe they remembered without having to search the entire Forum. Also, someone mentioned that a recipe specific thread could be downloaded and saved by any caller wanting to build their own "camp cookbook".  FWIW.....
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: bradleybuckman on July 20, 2012, 12:45:24 PM
Spicy Sausage & Bean Soup

1lb hot/spicy sausage
1 small onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 cans (15 1/2 oz) Great Northern Beans, undrained
2 cans chicken broth
1 can diced tomatoes, undrained
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp black pepper

Brown and drain the sausage and onion. Then, add everything together into pot and simmer/cook on low until ready.
Title: White Chicken Chili
Post by: bradleybuckman on July 20, 2012, 12:59:34 PM
White Chicken Chili

1-2 lbs of chicken, cooked and shredded
2 pkgs (1 pkg per lb of chicken) of McCormick White Chicken Chili Seasoning Mix (I've used the Wal-mart brand and it tastes the same)
1 can diced basil, oregano, and garlic tomatoes
2 cans of white beans
1 can of white shoepeg corn
1 can of chicken broth

Simmer together and top with shredded cheese.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on July 20, 2012, 10:26:23 PM
That sounds like just the thing for leftovers after roasting a chicken! It would probably take the leftovers from 2 or 3 of them, but I could freeze them until I had enough to do a 1/2 portion recipe. ;)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Gryphon on July 25, 2012, 02:47:07 PM
Smoked jalapeno and tomato bread (for bread machine)

3 cups white bread flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
tsp yeast
tsp salt (sea salt)
1/2 cup olive oil
2 diced smoked jalapenos
about 1/4 cup crumbled or chunked cheddar cheese

Dry stuff into the machine first, yeast on top.  Oil then yummy stuff.  I start my machine and add water as it mixes until the dough is right.  I like it just a bit wet.  The whole wheat flour takes a bit to absorb all the water.

I diced and tossed in the veg while frozen.  Made for less mess.  Thaws and mixes the smoke flavor in during the rise and mix cycles.

Same mix should work fine for regular bread too.  Slow rise dough takes to this very well also.
1 diced smoked, skinned tomato
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on July 25, 2012, 07:36:12 PM
Smoked jalapeno and tomato bread (for bread machine)

3 cups white bread flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
tsp yeast
tsp salt (sea salt)
1/2 cup olive oil
2 diced smoked jalapenos
about 1/4 cup crumbled or chunked cheddar cheese

Dry stuff into the machine first, yeast on top.  Oil then yummy stuff.  I start my machine and add water as it mixes until the dough is right.  I like it just a bit wet.  The whole wheat flour takes a bit to absorb all the water.

I diced and tossed in the veg while frozen.  Made for less mess.  Thaws and mixes the smoke flavor in during the rise and mix cycles.

Same mix should work fine for regular bread too.  Slow rise dough takes to this very well also.
1 diced smoked, skinned tomato

I'm not really a heat kinda guy, but these recipes you post Gryph are sounding mighty good, since your now an Honourary Canuck I think we'll have to make some kinda trade in the not too distant future... smoked peppers for coffee crisps or something like that... 8)
Title: Amish Friendship Bread
Post by: Old Philosopher on July 30, 2012, 07:54:52 PM
Since I just baked 6 loaves of this bread today, thought I'd pass it along for those who don't have the recipe.
Forgive me if it's been posted before.

AMISH FRIENDSHIP BREAD STARTER
___________________ ___________________ __
1 pkg. active dry yeast
3 c. sugar
3 c. flour
3 c. milk
On Day 1: Soften yeast mixture in 1/4 cup of lukewarm water. Set aside for 5 minutes, then stir well to be sure it has dissolved.
In a glass or plastic bowl, combine 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk. Stir in yeast mixture using a wooden or plastic spoon (don't use metal spoon or electric mixer). Cover bowl loosely with paper towel, cloth, wax paper or plastic wrap. Keep at room temperature (don't refrigerate).
On Days 2, 3 and 4: Using wooden or plastic spoon, stir mixture once each day.
On Day 5: Add 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk; stir.
On Days 6, 7, 8 and 9: Using wooden or plastic spoon, stir mixture once each day.
On Day 10: Add 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour and 1 cup milk. Remove 3 cups of mixture and give 1 cup each to three friends. Save remaining starter for yourself.


AMISH FRIENDSHIP BREAD:
___________________ ___________________ __
1 c. Amish friendship bread starter
2/3 c. oil
1 c. milk
3 eggs
2 c. flour
1 ?  tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 large box of vanilla pudding (not instant; try chocolate, lemon or butterscotch)
1 c. chopped nuts or raisins (optional)
2  tsp. cinnamon
1 c. sugar
In mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Bake in 2 well greased and floured or sugared 9"x5" bread pans. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.
NOTE: Raisins, chopped apples, drained, crushed pineapple, candied fruit, coconut, mashed banana, dates, chopped nuts and/or chocolate chips (1/2 cup each) may be added to batter before baking.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I prefer sugaring the greased pans. A couple slices will satisfy just about any sweet tooth!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: WoodsWoman on July 30, 2012, 10:34:44 PM
OP.. do you know if the three cups that are supposed to be given away can be frozen in 1 cup containers instead?

I think this is the same bread that my mother made when I was a teenager..  the recipe had poppy seeds in it.   Very good. :)


WW.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on July 31, 2012, 01:26:04 AM
OP.. do you know if the three cups that are supposed to be given away can be frozen in 1 cup containers instead?

I think this is the same bread that my mother made when I was a teenager..  the recipe had poppy seeds in it.   Very good. :)


WW.
I don't know what freezing would do to the yeast culture. That's what makes the whole thing work. Kinda like sourdough.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: WoodsWoman on July 31, 2012, 02:56:43 AM
Ok..thanks. :) 

WW.
Title: No knead bread
Post by: Gryphon on September 01, 2012, 09:34:32 PM

Cut n paste from Mother Earth News.  This is basically what I do.  There's videos all over youtube, one is an interview at a bakery...best one I've found is here: [size=78%]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU)[/size]


No-Knead Dutch Oven Bread


1/4 tsp active dry yeast
1 1/2 cups warm water
3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting. You may use white, whole wheat or a combination of the two.
1 1/2 tsp salt
Cornmeal or wheat bran for dusting


In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in water. Add the flour and salt, stirring until blended. The dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest at least 8 hours, preferably 12 to 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.
The dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it. Sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let it rest for about 15 minutes.
Using just enough flour to keep the dough from sticking to the work surface or to your fingers, gently shape it into a ball. Generously coat a clean dish towel with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal. Put the seam side of the dough down on the towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another towel and let rise for about 1 to 2 hours. When it?s ready, the dough will have doubled in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.
At least 20 minutes before the dough is ready, heat oven to 475 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in the oven as it heats. When the dough is ready, carefully remove the pot from the oven and lift off the lid. Slide your hand under the towel and turn the dough over into the pot, seam side up. The dough will lose its shape a bit in the process, but that?s OK. Give the pan a firm shake or two to help distribute the dough evenly, but don?t worry if it?s not perfect; it will straighten out as it bakes.
Cover and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the lid and bake another 15 to 20 minutes, until the loaf is beautifully browned. Remove the bread from the Dutch oven and let it cool on a rack for at least 1 hour before slicing.




Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/2007-12-01/Easy-No-Knead-Dutch-Oven-Crusty-Bread.aspx?page=2#ixzz25HM9kGfm
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on September 02, 2012, 10:23:33 AM
Good link Gryphon, thanks
Title: Zany Zucchini Pickles
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 20, 2012, 04:38:48 PM
This is a recipe from the Complete Home Preserving book from the Ball company.

I can't rave enough about the taste and texture of these pickles.

Zany Zucchini Pickles

14 cups diagonally sliced zucchini (Note: cut the zucchini into slices just long enough to stand up in a pint jar, about 1/2" thick, and as wide as the meat of the squash. Or...you can do them in rounds for burgers and sandwiches)
1/2 cup pickling or canning salt
cool water
6 cups white vinegar
4 cups granulated sugar
4 tsp mustard seeds
2 tsp celery seeds
2 tsp ground turmeric

1.  In a glass or stainless steel bowl layer zucchini slices with pickling salt. Cover with cool water and let stand for 2 hours.  Transfer to a colander in a sink and let drain.  Rinse with cool running water and drain thoroughly.

2. In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine vinegar, sugar, and spices.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar.  Reduce heat and boil gently for 5 minutes, until spices have infused the liquid.  Stir in zucchini. Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 1 hour.

3. Meanwhile get your jars and canner ready.

4.  Return saucepan to medium-high heat and bring zucchini mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat and boil gently for 5 minutes, until zucchini is heated through. (Note: 5 min is too long. Just heat the zucchini all the way through)

5. Pack zucchini into hot jars to within a generous 1/2 inch of top of jar.  Ladle hot liquid into jar to cover vegetables, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary by adding hot pickling liquid.  Wipe rim.  Center lid on jar. Screw band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip tight.

6. Place jars in canner, ensuring they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil and process for 10 minutes. Remove canner lid.  Wait 5 minutes, then remove jars, cool and store.  (Note: add 5 minutes processing time if you're between 1,000 and 5,000 feet elevation, per normal instructions)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on October 09, 2012, 01:15:42 PM
I've tried lots of different baked spaghetti recipes over the years, but this one is still the best I've tried. I got this recipe over 30 years ago and it's a good one for when the weather starts to get colder and ya want something that'll "stick to your ribs." 'Course, it ain't bad in the middle of the summer, neither!


Baked Spaghetti

1 1/2 lbs. of ground beef
2 medium onions chopped (I only use 1 onion)
1 small bottle green olives
1 can tomato soup (+1 can water mixed)
1 can cream of mushroom soup (+1 can water mixed)
1/2 lb. sharp cheddar cheese - grated
1 Tbsp. Worchestershire sauce
Salt/Pepper/Garlic - to taste
8 oz. spaghetti

Brown meat and onions. Drain. Add tomato soup, juice from olives, Worchestershire sauce, salt, pepper, and garlic. Mix well and bring to boil. Cover and simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Cook pasta and drain. In greased baking dish, layer 1/2 pasta, 1/2 sauce, 1/2 cheese. Repeat layers. Top with can of cream of mushroom soup and some chopped olives if desired.  (I do and add black sliced olives, too.)   Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

FWIW, my wife says to use only half the juice of the olives, but I like using all the juice.

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on October 09, 2012, 03:14:24 PM
I've tried lots of different baked spaghetti recipes over the years, but this one is still the best I've tried. I got this recipe over 30 years ago and it's a good one for when the weather starts to get colder and ya want something that'll "stick to your ribs." 'Course, it ain't bad in the middle of the summer, neither!


Baked Spaghetti

1 1/2 lbs. of ground beef
2 medium onions chopped (I only use 1 onion)
1 small bottle green olives
1 can tomato soup (+1 can water mixed)
1 can cream of mushroom soup (+1 can water mixed)
1/2 lb. sharp cheddar cheese - grated
1 Tbsp. Worchestershire sauce
Salt/Pepper/Garlic - to taste
8 oz. spaghetti

Brown meat and onions. Drain. Add tomato soup, juice from olives, Worchestershire sauce, salt, pepper, and garlic. Mix well and bring to boil. Cover and simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Cook pasta and drain. In greased baking dish, layer 1/2 pasta, 1/2 sauce, 1/2 cheese. Repeat layers. Top with can of cream of mushroom soup and some chopped olives if desired.  (I do and add black sliced olives, too.)   Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

FWIW, my wife says to use only half the juice of the olives, but I like using all the juice.

  Some times you hear about a recipe that says to you,  this is so weird it's got to be good,  thanks for posting it,  I'll give it a try and let you know if I'd do it a second time.   :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on October 09, 2012, 03:28:02 PM
Doesn't sound all that weird to me. We've done variations on this with great results (like diced up sausage instead of ground beef). We've also used penne or elbow macaroni instead of spaghetti. The kicker for me is the olives. I'm an olive freak, but I'm the only one in the family. I'd love to try this recipe, but without the olives it obviously wouldn't be the same.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on October 09, 2012, 03:38:36 PM
Doesn't sound all that weird to me. We've done variations on this with great results (like diced up sausage instead of ground beef). We've also used penne or elbow macaroni instead of spaghetti. The kicker for me is the olives. I'm an olive freak, but I'm the only one in the family. I'd love to try this recipe, but without the olives it obviously wouldn't be the same.

  Don't let that stop you,  what they can't see they can't complain about,  use the olive juice,  chop up half the olives and reserve to sprinkle them on your plate full later,  munch on the rest while you are waiting for the stuff to come out of the oven.    >:D
Title: Ramen in the woods
Post by: unswydd on November 04, 2012, 09:40:11 AM
I don't particularly like soup so I do something a little different with my Top Ramen.
I crunch up my ramen in the package, easier that way, then I warm up some butter in a skillet pour in the crunched up ramen noodles and brown them real well, once browned pour in your water and seasoning packet along with any veggies and meat (optional) and cover. Once the water has absorbed and noodles are softened it's done. Talk about a yummy and salty dish! lol
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: WoodsWoman on November 04, 2012, 09:46:07 AM
Unswydd , I'm going to have to give that a try and see if I can eat those things. :)   Thanks!

WW
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: unswydd on November 04, 2012, 10:40:38 AM
I think you'll find it yummy! I hate ramen.....lol but love it fixed this way!!!!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on November 27, 2012, 10:23:12 AM
This is an easy recipe for WOLFY'S DEER SUMMER SAUSAGE that I have 'diddled' with for years, but I think I'm finished messing with it now.  I just pulled it out of our recipe file to make up a batch with some burger from this year's buck.  Hope all you deer hunters give it a shot and let me know what you think.  We've received accolades from people that have had it and I've given the recipe out on other forums where it has been quite popular, too.  So, if you've got lots of deer burger to deal with, this is a great way to use some of it, but it works fine with beef burger, too.

3# deer burger
2 T liquid smoke
4-5 cloves crushed garlic....or MORE ;)
1 T whole mustard seed
3 T Morton Tender Quick
1 Cup water
1/4 t course-ground fresh black pepper
1/2 t onion powder
2 T brown sugar
1 T red pepper flakes

METHOD:
Mix all the ingredients together and pour over meat while mixing.......I use the dough hook on our KitchenAid stand mixer.  Form into two logs about 3" in diameter & 12" long.  Seal in foil & refrigerate for 24 hours. Punch holes in bottom of foil with a fork.  Place on broiler pan or cake rack on a sheet pan, so fat can drip out during baking.  Bake 1 1/4 hours @ 325 degrees.  Unwrap & cool.  Wrap with plastic wrap & store in refrigerator or freeze.

I mix up 6# at a time, because 3# just doesn't last long enough around here :stir:

This is kind of a 'basic' recipe that we have arrived at to suit different family members' taste 'prejudices', so feel free to experiment by adding different commonly added sausage ingredients that you may crave 8)
Title: Italian "peasant" bread
Post by: Old Philosopher on December 01, 2012, 11:00:17 AM
This is a simple, hearty bread that goes well with anything, any time. I make this about 4-5 times a week.
I cheat, and use a bread machine to knead the dough, the first rise, and the second kneading. Then I shape a loaf in a bread pan, let it rise, and bake it in the oven.  I've also just baked it on a greased cookie sheet for the traditional "peasant" loaf.

If you are using a bread machine, add the ingredients in the order given. If not, do it however you want.  You can even mix it all up in a gallon ziploc before taking it out to rise.

2 1/2 tsp yeast (1 packet)
3 cu flour
1 1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 1/3 cu water

That's it!  Mix the dough and let it rise to double the volume.
Knead it vigorously for about 5 minutes.
Grease whatever you're going to use as a cooking surface (D.O., flat rock, etc.) and let it rise a second time to double the volume again. The colder it is, the longer it will take.
Bake at 350o for about 25 minutes.
Cool slightly, cut and enjoy.
Title: Re: Italian "peasant" bread
Post by: Moe M. on December 01, 2012, 11:22:57 AM
This is a simple, hearty bread that goes well with anything, any time. I make this about 4-5 times a week.
I cheat, and use a bread machine to knead the dough, the first rise, and the second kneading. Then I shape a loaf in a bread pan, let it rise, and bake it in the oven.  I've also just baked it on a greased cookie sheet for the traditional "peasant" loaf.

If you are using a bread machine, add the ingredients in the order given. If not, do it however you want.  You can even mix it all up in a gallon ziploc before taking it out to rise.

2 1/2 tsp yeast (1 packet)
3 cu flour
1 1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 1/3 cu water

That's it!  Mix the dough and let it rise to double the volume.
Knead it vigorously for about 5 minutes.
Grease whatever you're going to use as a cooking surface (D.O., flat rock, etc.) and let it rise a second time to double the volume again. The colder it is, the longer it will take.
Bake at 350o for about 25 minutes.
Cool slightly, cut and enjoy.
   

  I make the same recipe except that mine calls for a couple pf tablespoons of light olive oil,  it's darn good bread,  but sometimes it comes out a little denser than other times, reading this i'm thinking that I may not be Kneading it as long as I should and depending too much on the action of my food processor with the dough blade,  but not wanting to over heat the dough from blade friction.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on December 01, 2012, 11:29:49 AM
Must be a 'bread day'.....we had blueberry sourdough pancakes for breakfast this morning.  Since the sourdough was percolating anyway, we mixed up a couple of loaves of bread and they're proofing now  :stir:

The REALLY good news is, there was enough dough left over for a batch of cinnamon rolls, too :banana:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on December 01, 2012, 11:37:00 AM
Must be a 'bread day'.....we had blueberry sourdough pancakes for breakfast this morning.  Since the sourdough was percolating anyway, we mixed up a couple of loaves of bread and they're proofing now  :stir:

The REALLY good news is, there was enough dough left over for a batch of cinnamon rolls, too :banana:

  You're going to have to buy some bigger bib overalls. :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on December 01, 2012, 11:48:46 AM
Must be a 'bread day'.....we had blueberry sourdough pancakes for breakfast this morning.  Since the sourdough was percolating anyway, we mixed up a couple of loaves of bread and they're proofing now  :stir:

The REALLY good news is, there was enough dough left over for a batch of cinnamon rolls, too :banana:

  You're going to have to buy some bigger bib overalls. :)

Tell me about it :doh:    Christmas is just around the corner, though :choptree:
Title: Re: Italian "peasant" bread
Post by: Old Philosopher on December 01, 2012, 12:30:29 PM

  I make the same recipe except that mine calls for a couple pf tablespoons of light olive oil,  it's darn good bread,  but sometimes it comes out a little denser than other times, reading this i'm thinking that I may not be Kneading it as long as I should and depending too much on the action of my food processor with the dough blade,  but not wanting to over heat the dough from blade friction.
It's all dependent upon heat, and especially humidity. Yeast is a plant, so think gardening when making bread.
Cold yeast is not happy yeast. If you can do a "yeast starter" in some tepid water (~90o) for about 15-30 minutes, it's a good thing. The yeast is already growing before being added into the dough.
No all yeast is created equal, by any means! A loaf that may need to only rise for 30 minutes @ 75o air temperature using Rapid Rise Yeast, may take an hour with 'regular' bread yeast.  If you are using wild yeast you've cultivated yourself (from fruit peels, say), you might be looking at 2-3 hours rising time.  The less rise you get from your yeast, the more dense the bread. (Duh.....)  Can't rush good bread.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on December 01, 2012, 12:47:56 PM
I think the 'tang' from the longer rise of sourdough-type breads is well worth the wait, too.  I'm kind of addicted to it after using it for so many years.  Then again, ALL homemade bread is good eats!
Title: Re: Italian "peasant" bread
Post by: Moe M. on December 02, 2012, 02:50:25 PM

  I make the same recipe except that mine calls for a couple pf tablespoons of light olive oil,  it's darn good bread,  but sometimes it comes out a little denser than other times, reading this i'm thinking that I may not be Kneading it as long as I should and depending too much on the action of my food processor with the dough blade,  but not wanting to over heat the dough from blade friction.
It's all dependent upon heat, and especially humidity. Yeast is a plant, so think gardening when making bread.
Cold yeast is not happy yeast. If you can do a "yeast starter" in some tepid water (~90o) for about 15-30 minutes, it's a good thing. The yeast is already growing before being added into the dough.
No all yeast is created equal, by any means! A loaf that may need to only rise for 30 minutes @ 75o air temperature using Rapid Rise Yeast, may take an hour with 'regular' bread yeast.  If you are using wild yeast you've cultivated yourself (from fruit peels, say), you might be looking at 2-3 hours rising time.  The less rise you get from your yeast, the more dense the bread. (Duh.....)  Can't rush good bread.

  Humidity is not much of a problem here,  and i'm at sea level,  I use granulated yeast, keep it refridgerated,  and abide by the experation dates,  I always proof it in luke warm water and feed it with a little sugar and give it a lot of time to bloom,  it's probably in my kneading technique,  I give it two rises with a mild beating in between. 
  It usually comes out great,  but every once in a while it comes out more dense than usual.
Title: Re: Italian "peasant" bread
Post by: Old Philosopher on December 02, 2012, 03:01:36 PM
...,  it's probably in my kneading technique,  I give it two rises with a mild beating in between. 
  ...
My bread machine is more adept than I. The "second kneading" in the bread machine goes on for a full 5 minutes. Pounds the crap out of it!
Father Dominic, the Benedictine bread monk, said that if your hands didn't get tired kneading, you weren't serious about it. Hahaha!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on December 02, 2012, 03:17:52 PM
Kneading is not such a good thing in dealing with sourdough....the less 'kneady' a person is, the better :doh:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on December 02, 2012, 03:23:12 PM
Kneading is not such a good thing in dealing with sourdough....the less 'kneady' a person is, the better :doh:
My wife does all the sourdough baking in the house. Babysitting sourdough starter is too much like raising a kid to appeal to me nowadays.  :P
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on December 02, 2012, 03:37:38 PM
Kneading is not such a good thing in dealing with sourdough....the less 'kneady' a person is, the better :doh:
My wife does all the sourdough baking in the house. Babysitting sourdough starter is too much like raising a kid to appeal to me nowadays.  :P

Since my wife and I created no progeny of our own, the pitter-patter of little yeasties running rampant within the confines of our sourdough pot is actually quite a comfort in our old age O:-)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on December 02, 2012, 03:51:28 PM
My wife does all the sourdough baking in the house. Babysitting sourdough starter is too much like raising a kid to appeal to me nowadays.  :P

Since my wife and I created no progeny of our own, the pitter-patter of little yeasties running rampant within the confines of our sourdough pot is actually quite a comfort in our old age O:-)
Your eloquence is exceeded only by your wit, as evidenced by the cacophony of laughter reverberating from the walls of my cabin.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on December 27, 2012, 08:17:47 PM
Ok, I thought I had posted this recipe before,  but apparently not. This is my crock pot chili. You will need a big 7 or 8 qt crock pot for this. And it has beans so the name is up for debate in chili purist circles.

Anyhow...

2 cans pinto beans drained and rinsed
2 cans red beans drained and rinsed
3 lbs. Ground beef browned and drained
1 green bell pepper seeded and diced
1 red bell pepper seeded and diced
1 anaheim chili seeded and diced
1 serrano chili seede and minced
5 cloves garlic minced
2 28oz. cans crushed tomatoes
1 12 oz. Can beef broth
1 12 oz. Can tomato paste
3 tsp. Chili powder
2 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp fresh ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients in crock pot and cook on low 8 hours or high 4 hours. Start the crock pot on high if cooking low, until it simmers, then turn back to low. Stir occasionally and before serving.

You may need to add salt before serving. Make sure to check. I like crackers on the side, grated cheddar or colby cheese and sour cream on top.  You can add an extra serrano chili, and a couple of chipotles in adobo if you want more heat. This recipe is very similar to one that came with my first crock pot, with a slight tweak here and there. Jalapenos can be substituted for serannos if they aren't available, and if you cant find an anaheim just use another bell pepper.

For variety you can substitute one of the cans of beans for a can of corn.


Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on December 27, 2012, 08:31:57 PM
Ok, I thought I had posted this recipe before,  but apparently not. This is my crock pot chili. You will need a big 7 or 8 qt crock pot for this. And it has beans so the name is up for debate in chili purist circles.

Anyhow...

2 cans pinto beans drained and rinsed
2 cans red beans drained and rinsed
3 lbs. Ground beef browned and drained
1 green bell pepper seeded and diced
1 red bell pepper seeded and diced
1 anaheim chili seeded and diced
1 serrano chili seede and minced
5 cloves garlic minced
2 28oz. cans crushed tomatoes
1 12 oz. Can beef broth
1 12 oz. Can tomato paste
3 tsp. Chili powder
2 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp fresh ground black pepper

Combine all ingredients in crock pot and cook on low 8 hours or high 4 hours. Start the crock pot on high if cooking low, until it simmers, then turn back to low. Stir occasionally and before serving.

You may need to add salt before serving. Make sure to check. I like crackers on the side, grated cheddar or colby cheese and sour cream on top.  You can add an extra serrano chili, and a couple of chipotles in adobo if you want more heat. This recipe is very similar to one that came with my first crock pot, with a slight tweak here and there. Jalapenos can be substituted for serannos if they aren't available, and if you cant find an anaheim just use another bell pepper.

For variety you can substitute one of the cans of beans for a can of corn.

  Sounds great PW,  I might substitute cumin for oregano but out side of that I like it,  BTW Boss,  if it's got beans in it it's Chili,  if it doesn't it's just hot meat sauce,  says me.   :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on January 04, 2013, 06:29:05 PM
Thanks Moe!

The recipe does call for cumin, 1 tsp. Would you be doubling up on the cumin or just omitting the oregano? I have made it without the oregano and can't tell much difference.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on January 05, 2013, 12:09:06 PM
Thanks Moe!

The recipe does call for cumin, 1 tsp. Would you be doubling up on the cumin or just omitting the oregano? I have made it without the oregano and can't tell much difference.

   It's difficult to say how much to use,  my Mom taught me to cook by taste,  I seldom follow a recipe unless i'm trying something for the first time,  I don't use oregano very much and even then it's sparingly, oregano is a strong herb,  but funny as it sounds just a little isn't very noticable,  but a hair over that and it imparts a bitter after taste to most foods.
   Cumin is one of the base ingredients in chili powder,  but usually most chili recipes calls for extra,  i've found that I use almost as much cumin as I do chili powder,  depending on my mood I sometimes use a little cinnamon in my chili as well,  and other times a little smoked papprika,  it's fun to experiment with foods like chili.
   When I do chili I usually make a big pot,  no less that 6 ~ 7 quarts in an eight quart pot,  so how much to use depends on how much you're making.
   
   Not everyone can make a good (above average) chili,  I can tell by your recipe that yours is a good one,  but don't be afraid to play around with it a little,  chili is a very forgiving food,  and hard to screw up,  I have a big family and they all love my chili,  but i doubt the it tastes exactly the same each time.   :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on January 05, 2013, 12:23:14 PM
Yeah mine changes due to availability of ingredients as well. ;)
Title: Chili Cheese Tots
Post by: WoodsWoman on January 05, 2013, 08:15:23 PM
Chili Cheese Tots
 
1 lb. ground beef
2 Cans ( 15 oz each) chili with beans
1 can (8 oz) tomato sauce
1 can (2 1/4 oz) sliced ripe olives drained
1 can ( 4 oz) chopped green chilies
2 cups ( 8 oz) shredded cheddar cheese, divided
1 package ( 32 oz ) frozen tator tots
 
In a large skillet, cook beef over medium heat until no longer pink; drain.  Stir in the chili, tomato sauce, olives, and chilies.  Transfer to two greased 8 in square baking dishes.  Sprinkle with  1 cup cheese; top with Tator Tots. Cover and freeze one casserole for up to 3 months.   
 
Cover and bake the remaining casserole at  350* for  30 - 35 mins. or until heated through. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup cheese.  Bake 5 mins more or until cheese is melted.
 
Note:  I want to try this recipe in my little 2 qt. camp dutch oven. :)   
 
WW.
Title: Re: Chili Cheese Tots
Post by: zammer on January 06, 2013, 10:44:31 AM
Note:  I want to try this recipe in my little 2 qt. camp dutch oven. :)   
 WW.

That would be cool, do you have an outdoor fire pit WW?
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: WoodsWoman on January 06, 2013, 11:18:55 AM
Kinda sorta..    its just a rectangle made of basement block out there under the snow.   Nothing fancy.
 
WW.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on January 06, 2013, 11:39:34 AM
Kinda sorta..    its just a rectangle made of basement block out there under the snow.   Nothing fancy.
 
WW.

Fancy shmancy....get that fire lit girl, and take some pics  8)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: BUSHYBEARD on January 06, 2013, 01:38:14 PM
Butternut squash soup

This is quick and simple and loaded with vitamin D

1 butternut squash
2 or 3 slices of oinion
Nutmeg
salt and pepper

peel and cut up squash in chunks, put in pot and add just enough water to cover, add oinion slices and as much nutmeg as you like and simmer tell tender (approx 10 min)
Now purre in blender with a little of the liquid(carefull), or emercing blender or mash and mix with liquid
add salt and pep to taste...

Saute'd squash;

Peel and cut any type of squash, cut in chunks and saute in oil or butter tell tender, then add TERRAGON and salt and pepper good side dish 
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Anubis1335 on January 17, 2013, 12:52:55 PM
CHICKEN AND STOVE TOP CASSEROLE   
 
3 boneless chicken breasts
1 can cream of mushroom soup
8 oz. sour cream
8 oz. milk
1 box Stove Top stuffing
Salt and pepper to taste
2C Minute Rice

Cut chicken into bite size pieces brown in 1 tablespoon butter. Prepare Stove Top as directed on box. Prepare rice as directed on box, set aside.  Mix together sour cream, mushroom soup, and milk. Mix chicken in with soup mixture. Place in rectangular casserole top with stuffing. Bake at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes. 
Top rice w/ this mixture.  The rice is optional but it really is good w/ the gravy/sauce that gets made

I really do love this stuff.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: BUSHYBEARD on January 17, 2013, 02:42:49 PM
CHICKEN AND STOVE TOP CASSEROLE   
 
3 boneless chicken breasts
1 can cream of mushroom soup
8 oz. sour cream
8 oz. milk
1 box Stove Top stuffing
Salt and pepper to taste
2C Minute Rice

Cut chicken into bite size pieces brown in 1 tablespoon butter. Prepare Stove Top as directed on box. Prepare rice as directed on box, set aside.  Mix together sour cream, mushroom soup, and milk. Mix chicken in with soup mixture. Place in rectangular casserole top with stuffing. Bake at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes. 
Top rice w/ this mixture.  The rice is optional but it really is good w/ the gravy/sauce that gets made

I really do love this stuff.


How ya doin Anubis ?. . This sounds like it'd work with a dutch oven. . that'd make some mighty fine eaten 

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Anubis1335 on January 17, 2013, 02:44:34 PM



How ya doin Anubis ?. . This sounds like it'd work with a dutch oven. . that'd make some mighty fine eaten 


Doing well, thanks!  YOu?  I bet it would work pretty ez in the DO.  Give it a whirl and let us know please!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on January 17, 2013, 02:46:19 PM
What doesn't work in a Dutch oven? 8)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Anubis1335 on January 17, 2013, 02:47:17 PM
What doesn't work in a Dutch oven? 8)

Ill take "Everything in the DO works and is better" for the win, Alex!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on October 24, 2013, 03:44:37 PM
Amish Country Breakfast
1 pound sliced bacon, diced
1 medium sweet onion, chopped
6 eggs, lightly beaten
4 cups frozen shredded hash brown potatoes, thawed
2 cups (8 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese
1-1/2 cups (12 ounces) 4% cottage cheese
1-1/4 cups shredded Swiss cheese
In a large skillet, cook bacon and onion until bacon is crisp; drain. In a large bowl, combine the remaining ingredients; stir in bacon mixture. Transfer to a greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking dish. Bake, uncovered, at 350? for 35-40 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Let stand for 10 minutes before cutting.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: crashdive123 on October 28, 2013, 06:44:01 PM
Simple steak seasoning.

Found this recipe that supposedly mimics that of Long Horn Steak House's Prairie Dust. I've tried it a few times and must say that it is excellent.

1 tablespoon salt
1 1/4 teaspoon paprika
1 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander

Mix it all up - and sprinkle liberally.

Cooking tip for steak - get a good sear to seal in the juices. Normally I use a hot grill, but recently started using hot, hot, hot cast iron. Sear for a bout a minute per side - finish cooking - let rest - eat.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on October 28, 2013, 06:50:03 PM
Sounds good, CD!  I'll try it soon.
Title: MY MOM'S LEMON JELLO CAKE
Post by: wolfy on February 08, 2014, 06:26:50 PM
This cake is most definitely WOLFY APPROVED!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


This is my favorite cake of all time! :drool:    We just had this last week for my "BIRTHDAY CAKE'' at my request. :banana:   It's very moist and tangy lemon cake and requires no frosting, as it kind of glazes itself.  :shrug:  It's not as good if you eat it the day that it's baked.  It requires 'aging' for at LEAST 24-36 hours to get juicy and flavorful......trus t me! :thumbsup:

Dissolve 1 small box lemon Jello in 1 cup boiling water. Cool. 8).   In a large mixing bowl, lightly beat 4 eggs.   Add 3/4 cup oil and cooled Jello.   To this mixture, add 1 box lemon cake mix.   Beat with electric mixer for about 2 minutes.   Pour into a 9"X13" cake pan.   Bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes.

While cake is baking, mix together 2 cups powdered sugar & 1/2 cup Real Lemon concentrate.

When cake is done and still hot, pierce all over the top at 1" intervals with a table fork.   Pour powdered sugar/lemon mix over the top of it.   This will soak in and form a light glaze. 

WAIT 24-36 HOURS!...........DAGNABIT!! >:(

Serve with ice cream, whipped topping or 'neat'..........like I think it's at it's best! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wsdstan on February 08, 2014, 06:28:54 PM
Sounds good.  A man's kind of cake. :)
Title: Re: MY MOM'S LEMON JELLO CAKE
Post by: Moe M. on February 10, 2014, 06:29:45 AM
This cake is most definitely WOLFY APPROVED!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


This is my favorite cake of all time! :drool:    We just had this last week for my "BIRTHDAY CAKE'' at my request. :banana:   It's very moist and tangy lemon cake and requires no frosting, as it kind of glazes itself.  :shrug:  It's not as good if you eat it the day that it's baked.  It requires 'aging' for at LEAST 24-36 hours to get juicy and flavorful......trus t me! :thumbsup:

Dissolve 1 small box lemon Jello in 1 cup boiling water. Cool. 8).   In a large mixing bowl, lightly beat 4 eggs.   Add 3/4 cup oil and cooled Jello.   To this mixture, add 1 box lemon cake mix.   Beat with electric mixer for about 2 minutes.   Pour into a 9"X13" cake pan.   Bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes.

While cake is baking, mix together 2 cups powdered sugar & 1/2 cup Real Lemon concentrate.

When cake is done and still hot, pierce all over the top at 1" intervals with a table fork.   Pour powdered sugar/lemon mix over the top of it.   This will soak in and form a light glaze. 

WAIT 24-36 HOURS!...........DAGNABIT!! >:(

Serve with ice cream, whipped topping or 'neat'..........like I think it's at it's best! :thumbsup:

   Sounds delish old pard,  but 3/4 cup of oil is going to catch up with you,  and you ain't getting any younger bud.
   Just for the haliibut, next time you make it try using 1/4 cup of oil and 1/2 cup of apple sauce instead of all that oil.

   Or not,  It's your birthday.        :shrug:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on February 10, 2014, 06:41:17 AM
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: rtaylor129 on February 10, 2014, 07:55:19 AM
Rabbit Stew

Ingredients
1 whole rabbit cleaned and skinned
4 russet potatoes cubed
4 carrots cubed
2 large onions finely diced
2stalks celery
4 quarts of broth (I use veggie)
3 tbsp of flour
2 bay leaves
Salt and pepper to taste
1ounce of olive oil

In a stew pot place olive oil in bottom and heat up. Next spread the flour all over the rabbit. Next brown all sides of the rabbit. Add all the broth. Bring to boil and then reduce to simmer. Cook minimum 2 hours before adding veggies. Finally add veggies and cook til potatoes are fork tender. To thicken the stew add a slurry of flour and water until the desired thickness is achieved. Before serving remove the bay leaves.

That is my absolute favorite rabbit recipe
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on February 10, 2014, 05:09:29 PM
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:

  OK,  it's your funeral.      :taunt: :rofl: :lol:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on February 10, 2014, 05:18:22 PM
At least around here when there's a funeral there's lots of food.  If they're serving this cake at wolfy's, I'm going!
And even if they're not, I'm gonna make it before then!  Sounds wonderful!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on February 10, 2014, 05:36:24 PM
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:

  OK,  it's your funeral.      :taunt: :rofl: :lol:
You're invited, Moe......I've specified Mom's Lemon Jello Cake be served after the service. O:-)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on February 10, 2014, 06:00:35 PM
ONCE a year ain't gon'na kill me, but if it does, I'll go down with a drooling smile on my face! :drool: :lol:

  OK,  it's your funeral.      :taunt: :rofl: :lol:
You're invited, Moe......I've specified Mom's Lemon Jello Cake be served after the service. O:-)

  Ok,  but I'll need directions.   ;)

   If it's all the same to you I'd much rather that I didn't get an invite,  if you get my drift,  just have a smaller piece and stick around for a while longer.
Title: HUDSON BAY BREAD
Post by: wolfy on February 23, 2014, 05:36:38 PM
Here's a high-energy 'bread' that's good for quick, filling and hunger-satisfying trail food.  Famous in the canoe country for years.....a couple of pieces w/peanut butter will keep you going all day long.   It's called Hudson Bay Bread or just Bay Bread.   A HECKUVALOT better than Pilot Bread!


                                                         HUDSON BAY BREAD

1-1/2 lbs. margarine or butter (Butter, always!)

4 cups of sugar (substitute raw, unrefined evaporated cane sugar)

2/3 cup dark Karo syrup or use maple syrup or blackstrap molasses.

2/3 cup honey

2 tsp. maple flavoring (If you use pure maple syrup, you don?t need this.)

Cream together the above ingredients.

Add while mixing:

1-1/2 cups of ground nuts (Almonds, walnuts or peanuts)

19 cups of oatmeal (use 'Old Fashioned' or the kind you have to cook. The less refined the grain, the more nutrition).

I usually add a little salt, too....everything needs a little salt to bring out the flavor.

Spread in a large sheet pan. Press it down into the pan. Bake at 325 degrees in a wind (or convection) oven for 15-18 minutes. As soon as the bread has been taken from the oven, use a spatula to press it down again. This presses the bread together to keep it from crumbling.

Cut it while still warm. For home-size preparation, cut this recipe at least in half. A conventional oven requires a longer baking time.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on February 23, 2014, 05:40:39 PM
Saw that recipe in that other thread, wolfy.  That looks good!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on February 23, 2014, 05:43:15 PM
Saw that recipe in that other thread, wolfy.  That looks good!
I thought it would be easier to find in a 'search' here in Just Recipes, rather than buried in a thread on dry staples. :P
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: bdavison on February 23, 2014, 07:59:08 PM
My recipe

Catch trout.
Fillet trout, and cut into 1/4" x 1" strips
Put trout in brine (salt, water, brown sugar) for 15 min
Dig hole 5" deep and 1ft around.
Build stick tepee over hole.
Make rack inside to hang trout.
Cover tepee with tarp.
Hang brined trout on rack.
Take hot coals from your campfire and put in the hole you dug.
Put debarked slightly green hardwood over coals so that it smokes
Maintain smoking over wood for 2-3 hours at around 160-200F
Take trout out of tepee
Lay it on a tortilla with some cream cheese
Eat it.
Repeat as necessary.

Edit:
Have gun nearby to ward off hungry neighbors and bears.

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on February 26, 2014, 09:51:56 AM
Potato, Cheddar, Bacon Soup

6 strips of thick cut bacon
3 TBS butter
1 large onion, diced
1 large carrot, diced
1 clove garlic, minced (I just use about a heaping tsp of the stuff from a jar)
1/4 cup AP flour
6 cups chicken broth
3 large russet potatoes cut into cubes
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 cups grated sharp cheddar cheese (about 8 ounces)
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Salt to taste
Chopped fresh chives (if ya gottem)
Fry bacon in a 4 quart pot (I use a 6 quart or 8 quart) until crisp.  Remove bacon and pour off all but about a TBS of drippings.  Add butter to pan and cook and stir until melted.
Add onion and carrots and cook until tender about 5 minutes or so.  Add flour and cook and stir for a couple of minutes to make a roux.  Gradually stir in broth.
Add potatoes and heat to a boil.  Reduce heat to low and cook for 15 minutes or until potatoes are tender and mixture is thickened.
Stir in cheese and cream and cook until cheese is melted.  Season with black pepper and salt to your liking.  Crumble bacon and garnish soup with bacon and chives.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on February 26, 2014, 09:57:26 AM
The measurements for the cream & flour came through as "??", Nuke.....might want to edit before you can't.   Sounds like a really good chowder recipe.....THANKS! :)

EDIT:  looks like you caught it......I guessed right on the cream, but would have added 1/4 cup more flour if I'd have dumped it in all at once. 8)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on February 26, 2014, 09:59:41 AM
Yeah, I fixed it, wolfy.

I tried adding some sort of seafood to it once.  Don't remember now if it was shrimp, oysters, clams, or fish.  If I'd left out the cheddar cheese in the original recipe, I think it would've been fine.  It just didn't taste right and I'm almost positive it was the cheese that made it taste off.  'Course, I've since learned from the Food Channel that seafood and cheese don't pair well.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Yellowyak on February 28, 2014, 02:57:07 PM
Beer Cheese Recipe

This was always a staple in our house when growing up in Kentucky. I've copied this in from my wife's web site (http://www.timeforfamily.com/Recipes/ryans_beer_cheese.html). Excellent on saltines.

My husband is from Lexington, Kentucky and he has fond memories of beer cheese. His favorite brand is Hall's. We have experimented and tried many recipes until we came up with this version. My son Ryan has mastered making this recipe and he is the family beer cheese expert.

Ingredients:

16 oz sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
8 oz beer, flattened and room temperature
3 oz cream cheese
4 medium sized garlic cloves, very finely minced
3 tbs worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp dry mustard
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp cream styled horseradish sauce (optional)
Directions:

Except for cheese, place all ingredients in a blender. Blend on high. You can also do this in a food processor.
Very gradually add shredded cheese to the blender.
Continue to blend until the mixture is very creamy. We blend this for at least 10 minutes. This is what we believe is the trick in getting the smoothest consistency and the best at incorporating the flavors.
Chill for at least 4 hours or overnight. The longer it sits the better.
Serve at room temperature with Saltine crackers or pretzels.
Comments:

- If the garlic are large, use only 3 cloves.

- Don't even try to use prepackaged shredded cheese. Take the time to grate/shred the cheese yourself. It is worth it.

- I prefer to make this at least the day before serving. This allows the flavors to develop and meld together.

- We have omitted the horseradish when we don't have it on hand and it is still very good.

Tips:

- To flatten the beer, pour it out quickly into a large glass or container and allow the foam to settle completely.

Variations:

- None
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on February 28, 2014, 03:41:59 PM
That sounds GREAT! :drool:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on February 28, 2014, 03:52:14 PM
PARTY TIME!!!  Beer, pretzels and Drunken Cheese Dip!
Title: Spicy Cheese Dip
Post by: Old Philosopher on February 28, 2014, 04:03:22 PM
A lot of recipes appear complicated, not to mention a lot of work.

Here's a killer cheese dip so simple even a caveman can do it....or a bachelor.


1 10oz can of Ro-Tel Diced Tomatoes with Green Chilies.
1 lb of Velveeta Cheese

Cube the Velveeta into 1" chunks.
Open can of Ro-Tel.

Toss cubes of Velveeta in a large microwave proof bowl with the Ro-Tel
Microwave on Med power until the cheese melts.
Remove from microwave and stir.

Break out the chips.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Yellowyak on February 28, 2014, 04:05:46 PM
That sounds GREAT! :drool:

Thanks. A lot of the restaurants in the area where I grew up served this as an appetizer, similar to chips and salsa these days. Always a treat for me.

PARTY TIME!!!  Beer, pretzels and Drunken Cheese Dip!

A snack fit for a king...
Title: Re: Spicy Cheese Dip
Post by: Yellowyak on February 28, 2014, 04:11:54 PM
A lot of recipes appear complicated, not to mention a lot of work.

Here's a killer cheese dip so simple even a caveman can do it....or a bachelor.


1 10oz can of Ro-Tel Diced Tomatoes with Green Chilies.
1 lb of Velveeta Cheese

Cube the Velveeta into 1" chunks.
Open can of Ro-Tel.

Toss cubes of Velveeta in a large microwave proof bowl with the Ro-Tel
Microwave on Med power until the cheese melts.
Remove from microwave and stir.

Break out the chips.


Sounds like it would work with some toasted bread on a cool evening, fondue style.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on February 28, 2014, 04:19:20 PM
That Tomatoes and Green Chilies Ro-Tel is a passable salsa right out of the can. Just add a pinch of salt, and a squeeze of lemon juice.
Title: Re: Spicy Cheese Dip
Post by: imnukensc on February 28, 2014, 04:35:33 PM
A lot of recipes appear complicated, not to mention a lot of work.

Here's a killer cheese dip so simple even a caveman can do it....or a bachelor.


1 10oz can of Ro-Tel Diced Tomatoes with Green Chilies.
1 lb of Velveeta Cheese

Cube the Velveeta into 1" chunks.
Open can of Ro-Tel.

Toss cubes of Velveeta in a large microwave proof bowl with the Ro-Tel
Microwave on Med power until the cheese melts.
Remove from microwave and stir.

Break out the chips.

Add some fried, crumbled ground beef or sausage to that and its even better!   :cheers:

That beer cheese sounds great, too!   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on February 28, 2014, 04:54:10 PM
I love that stuff with the sausage added to it :drool:.............heck, I love it ALL!! :drool: :drool:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: WoodsWoman on March 17, 2014, 09:11:03 AM
I'm just going to share the link to Bacon Jam since its the recipe and a pictorial to go with it.

http://tastykitchen.com/blog/2012/07/bacon-jam-ooh-mommy/#comment-787353

That picture at the very bottom with the egg on top....  oooh mommy... :)

WW.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on March 17, 2014, 10:02:25 AM
I'm just going to share the link to Bacon Jam since its the recipe and a pictorial to go with it.

http://tastykitchen.com/blog/2012/07/bacon-jam-ooh-mommy/#comment-787353

That picture at the very bottom with the egg on top....  oooh mommy... :)

WW.

Mmmmmmmmm...sounds good WW


Now you Carny-a-voirs will hate me for this but here goes my vegi chili recipe, no I'm not a vegi-head but hey! ( which I'm actually making as I type )

1 med onion chopped
1 red bell pepper chopped
5 cloves garlic chopped

Throw the above in a med sized soup pot and add 3/4 cup veg stock ( you can obviously use whatever stock you have, but don't use any on the rise  ;) )  bring to a low boil and stir as its doing so  :stir: when the onions turn translucent add...

4 teaspoons chili powder and stir like crazy for 1 minute  :stir: :stir: :stir: the powder might start to stick to pot, that's o.k, just don't let it burn, then remove from heat...

add the following...

1   28 oz can chopped tomatoes or the equivalent fresh
The rest of your 4 cup box of stock
2 1/2 cups lentils, I happened to have green on hand
3 cups of water

(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/20140317_112918_zpse50a8bc7.jpg)

Bring the pot to a boil and stir well then turn down to low and let simmer for 45 min, check and stir from time to time  :stir: after 45 min add...

1/4 cup chopped cilantro ( if you like ) and simmer an additional 15 min.

When you first start to cook it up it appears as tho it might turn out more like a soup, but it thickens up a lot and turns out more like the consistency of a ground beef chili...It should make about 6 good sized individual bowls

(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/20140317_120837_zpsd0b9d248.jpg)


...I'm not going to pretend its BETTER than a meat based chili, but it's a pretty good alternative .... :cheers:

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on March 17, 2014, 11:13:09 AM
I'm just going to share the link to Bacon Jam since its the recipe and a pictorial to go with it.

http://tastykitchen.com/blog/2012/07/bacon-jam-ooh-mommy/#comment-787353

That picture at the very bottom with the egg on top....  oooh mommy... :)

WW.

  I love bacon as much as the average person,  but some things just go over the top,  Bacon Ice Cream comes to mind   :puke:,  another is bacon wrapped chicken,  I'm not talking about draping a chicken with a few strips of bacon,  I do my pheasants that way, I'm talking about the people who use lattice work to knit a few of pounds of bacon into a full snuggy to encapsulate a chicken,  that's a  bit much.
 So when I saw Bacon Jam in your post it gave me the quizzes thinking about the fat,  kind of like pemmican made with bacon fat   :puke:,  but after reading the recipe I'm thinking that this could be good, different,  but good,  so Thanks for sharing.    :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on March 17, 2014, 11:53:47 AM

Now you Carny-a-voirs will hate me for this but here goes my vegi chili recipe, no I'm not a vegi-head but hey! ( which I'm actually making as I type )

1 med onion chopped
1 red bell pepper chopped
5 cloves garlic chopped

Throw the above in a med sized soup pot and add 3/4 cup veg stock ( you can obviously use whatever stock you have, but don't use any on the rise  ;) )  bring to a low boil and stir as its doing so  :stir: when the onions turn translucent add...

4 teaspoons chili powder and stir like crazy for 1 minute  :stir: :stir: :stir: the powder might start to stick to pot, that's o.k, just don't let it burn, then remove from heat...

add the following...

1   28 oz can chopped tomatoes or the equivalent fresh
The rest of your 4 cup box of stock
2 1/2 cups lentils, I happened to have green on hand
3 cups of water

(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/20140317_112918_zpse50a8bc7.jpg)

Bring the pot to a boil and stir well then turn down to low and let simmer for 45 min, check and stir from time to time  :stir: after 45 min add...

1/4 cup chopped cilantro ( if you like ) and simmer an additional 15 min.

When you first start to cook it up it appears as tho it might turn out more like a soup, but it thickens up a lot and turns out more like the consistency of a ground beef chili...It should make about 6 good sized individual bowls

(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/20140317_120837_zpsd0b9d248.jpg)


...I'm not going to pretend its BETTER than a meat based chili, but it's a pretty good alternative .... :cheers:

    No offense to our plant eating members here,  and this is strictly this man's opinion,  but Zammer my friend,  you've been lied to,  that's not Chili,  it looks good and probably tastes wonderful,  but it ain't Chili,  what you got right there is a thick Tex-Mex Vegetable Soup.

   While I admit that it may sound picky on my part,  Chili contains some kind of red meat,  and if one chooses they can add beans,  lentils are for soup. 

   But let me add,  your soup looks good,  I make a Tex-Mex soup using your basic recipe,  where mine differs is I use either stew meat or hamburger in my recipe and I also use red kidney beans, black beans, and buckeye beans,  other than that it's about the same.
   Also,  your recipe would be a good meal for preparing in a camp setting where having fresh meat might be iffy.

   Thanks for sharing your recipe,  I will be adding it to my list of good trail foods.    :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on March 17, 2014, 12:09:32 PM
Au contraire mon ami......chili has NO meat in it. :stir:      Chili CON CARNE........does! 8)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on March 17, 2014, 12:11:30 PM
I know its not real Chili Moe, but we can pretend just this once  ;)  from now on, only pure authentic recipes, I pinky swear  8)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on March 17, 2014, 04:24:23 PM
Au contraire mon ami......chili has NO meat in it. :stir:      Chili CON CARNE........does! 8)

   You're splitting hairs bub,  Chili over most of the country has meat in it,  the big argument is usually over bean and tomatoes,  I get your point, but I wouldn't walk into a bar in Texas or La. and claim the chili doesn't contain beef,  It might mean spending a few hours in some ER somewhere.   :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on March 17, 2014, 05:53:50 PM
Au contraire mon ami......chili has NO meat in it. :stir:      Chili CON CARNE........does! 8)

   You're splitting hairs bub,  Chili over most of the country has meat in it,  the big argument is usually over bean and tomatoes,  I get your point, but I wouldn't walk into a bar in Texas or La. and claim the chili doesn't contain beef,  It might mean spending a few hours in some ER somewhere.   :)
I never claimed it didn't, nor would I try to order any that was meatless......espec ially in Nebraska! :stir: :lol:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wsdstan on March 17, 2014, 06:45:38 PM
I subscribe to the meat too but to me real chili never has beans. 
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Moe M. on March 18, 2014, 06:08:19 AM
I subscribe to the meat too but to me real chili never has beans.

  Thanks Stan,  that's another difference that has long been debated by Chili enthusiasts,  since this is in the recipes section and the discussion on Chili could be a long one as well as an interesting one,  I'm going to start a new thread just for Chili (which I am planning to make this morning).
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: customfiresteels on March 22, 2014, 04:04:31 PM
POTJIEKOS! Bread recipes

Back home we use a 3 legged round bottom cast iron pot to do this kind of cooking. I think a flat bottom ducth oven will work but cannot say if the times would be the same etc. I had my pots from home shipped here at considerable cost. The pots I am speaking of are like this.

https://www.lehmans.com/p-761-3-legged-cast-iron-kettles.aspx

Anyway here is a few recipes for you guys for bread. You will need to convert the measurements.

Mealie (corn) Surprise

60 ML butter
250 ML cake flour
500 ML milk
5 cans (410g) whole kernel corn - drained
500 ML grated cheddar cheese

Melt the butter in the pot. Add the flour and stir until mixed. Remove from the coals and gradually add the milk. Return the pot to the coals, stirring the mixture continually until it comes to a boil. Add the mealies (corn) and mix well. Sprinkle the cheese on top and cover. Simmer very gently for 1 hour 15 minutes. Do not stir, garnish with chopped parsely.

Raisin and aniseed pot bread

825 ML tepid water
5 ML white sugar
20 ML dried yeast
12 x 250 ML cake flour
30 ML salt
10 ML aniseed
cooking oil to grease the pot and your hands
250 ML seedless raisins

Dissolve the sugar in 125 ML tepid water. Stir in the yeast until dissolved. Cover the mixture with a saucer and leave to stand for approximately 10 minutes until it forms a thick froth.

Sift the flour and salt together and add the aniseed. Add the yeast mixture and enough water, little by little, to form a moist dough. Knead the dough for 10 to 15 minutes until it no longer sticks to the dish or hands. Grease the top of the dough with oil and cover with plastic cling wrap. Wrap the dish with the dough in a cloth and leave in a warm spot for about 2 hours until the dough has doubled in bulk.

Oil your hands and remove the dough from the dish. Punch down lightly and press raisins into the dough. Oil a flat or round bottomed pot and its lid. Place the dough in the pot, cover with the lid and wrap the pot in a cloth and leave to rise until the dough touches the lid.

Place the pot over the coals and cover the lid with a few coals and bake for 1 hour until an even brown. Remove the bread from the pot and wrap in a cloth.

I have many more recipes, I hope you guys enjoy these. Maybe I will post a recipe for " oxtail" soon.

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on March 22, 2014, 04:19:07 PM
I've got a 10 qt. Best Duty potjie.:stir:    Best campfire corn popper ever made. :popcorn: :popcorn:       No doubt, it's the heaviest, too! :lol: :cheers:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: customfiresteels on March 23, 2014, 02:35:34 PM
Here is one of my favorites as well.

Oxtail and Banana Potjie

30 ML butter
1 large oxtail cut into joints (I have bought it already done and packaged at walmart before)
3 medium onions, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/2 red chilli, finely chopped or 1.2 ML chilli powder
5 whole cloves
5 ML dried mixed herbs
2 bay leaves
salt and pepper to taste
500 ML warm water
2 ripe bananas
12 whole baby potatoes
250 g whole button mushrooms
1 large tomato, skinned and sliced
5 ML chopped parsley
10 Whole button onions

Sauce

62 ML brown vinegar
20 ML catchup
20 ML chutney (apricot if you can find it)
20 ML honey
10 ML mild curry powder

Heat the butter in the pot and fry the meat for 15 minutes. Add the onions , garlic, chilli, cloves, herbs, bay leaves and salt and pepper to taste. Fry for another 15 minutes. Should the potjie become too dry, add a little hot water. Add 500 ML hot water. Cover and simmer the meat gently for 2 hours.

In the meantime, mix the gravy ingredients and set aside. Arrange the banana on top of the meat. Arrange the vegetables on top of this in order listed.  Sprinkle the parsley on top. Arrange the onions at the very top and simmer for 1 hour.

Add the gravy and simmer for a further 30 minutes.

Serve eat and enjoy ! (good for 4 to 6 people depending on portion size)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on April 06, 2014, 01:49:15 PM
I can't claim credit for this, since it comes out of Miss Kay's (Duck Dynasty) cookbook. But it's just too good not to share:
I don't list proportions, because her recipe is for 6-16 servings!  Just wing it for the number of "eggs" you think you can eat.  ;D



Willie's Armadillo Eggs


Fresh jalapeno peppers, sliced length ways, seeds and veins removed
Your favorite country sausage, formed into as many patties as you have pepper halves
Softened cream cheese
Bacon slices
Melted butter (1/4 lb ought to do it)

If you're going to grill, forget the oven, otherwise pre-heat to 400 deg.

Fill each 1/2 jalapeno with cream cheese.
Mold a sausage patty around the pepper to completely enclose it.
Spiral wrap each "egg" with a strip of bacon.

Put on the grill and cook until the sausage is done, and the bacon is crisp.

In the oven, bake at 400 deg for 15-20 minutes, then turn on the broiler until the bacon is crispy.

In any case, when they'e done, drizzle with the melted butter and chow down!

Ooooh....my!  Yum!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on April 06, 2014, 02:12:09 PM
I'm thinking the hell with the grill or the oven for these............de ep fat fry'em!   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on April 06, 2014, 02:20:19 PM
I'm thinking the hell with the grill or the oven for these............de ep fat fry'em!   :thumbsup:
LOL! You'd be an instant fan of the "Deep Fried Everything" TV show!  ;D  You'd probably want to toothpick the bacon so it didn't uncurl in the fat, though.
Title: Bacon and Cornbread
Post by: Old Philosopher on April 18, 2014, 10:00:08 AM
Speaking of bacon...here's a trick I just learned.

Lay a criss-cross grid of bacon strips in the bottom of your D.O. and put it over the heat. Let the bacon start sizzling while you make up your favorite cornbread recipe. Let the bacon cook just enough to grease the bottom of the pot. Pour the batter over the bacon and cook as you normally would.
When done, turn the bread out upside down, and you have a topping of nicely fried bacon on your bread.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on April 18, 2014, 12:40:45 PM
Sounds like another "must try."  Wife will be making some cornbread tonight to go with some speckled butter beans and ham hocks.  Won't be in a DO, of course, but it will be in CI.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: imnukensc on April 18, 2014, 05:58:53 PM
Had to give it a shot.  It was very good, but next time I'll do a few things differently:
1)  Cut the bacon just a little longer so it goes up the side of the pan just a little
2)  Cook the bacon longer before adding the batter or use thin sliced bacon (this was thick sliced bacon cooking in a 400 degree oven for about 10 minutes before adding batter)

Before the batter and before going into a 400 degree oven for 10 minutes
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1160_zpse662e5f2.jpg)

Just out of the oven
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1161_zpsaeae4255.jpg)

Flipped
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1163_zps55e511bc.jpg)

Speckled butter beans with ham hocks over rice cooked in chicken stock with onions
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1165_zpsc0220e5a.jpg)

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on April 18, 2014, 06:05:03 PM
That actually made me salivate! :drool:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Old Philosopher on April 18, 2014, 06:37:51 PM
Had to give it a shot.  It was very good, but next time I'll do a few things differently:
1)  Cut the bacon just a little longer so it goes up the side of the pan just a little
2)  Cook the bacon longer before adding the batter or use thin sliced bacon (this was thick sliced bacon cooking in a 400 degree oven for about 10 minutes before adding batter)

Before the batter and before going into a 400 degree oven for 10 minutes
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1160_zpse662e5f2.jpg)

Just out of the oven
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1161_zpsaeae4255.jpg)

Flipped
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1163_zps55e511bc.jpg)

Speckled butter beans with ham hocks over rice cooked in chicken stock with onions
(http://i1159.photobucket.com/albums/p632/imnukensc/IMG_1165_zpsc0220e5a.jpg)
Thanks for trying it! Nice picture show. Yummm......
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: jackalope10mm on May 02, 2014, 03:18:38 PM
Hi All new here been looking at the site and thought I'd share one of my recipes with you'al.
I just call it my BBQ Chicken and Rice

I take chicken white meat as much as you thank you will need to feed everyone
cut it up into small chunks (about 1/2 in square)
cut up onion to suit your self (as much as you like)
simmer the chicken and onions together until done
then I add BBQ sauce to it as much as you like (experiment with it as I like mine runnie)
while the above is simmering I put my rice on to cook.
I find that about the time the rice is cooked the chicken in the bbq sauce is about at the
right thickness to mix with the rice or on the side or like most of my family like it over
the top of the rice.

I find that a 4lb bag off chicken breast at Wal-Mart is about right to serve about 7 people
and 1 1/2 cup to 2 cups of rice fits the bill also.

Hope all who try it will like it.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on May 02, 2014, 04:44:26 PM
Thanks for sharing that recipe jackalope...and welcome to BnB  :cheers:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: ysmaellol on June 16, 2014, 07:25:01 PM
Nice!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: crashdive123 on July 26, 2014, 04:35:54 PM
Just finished some of the best Salmon Cakes with Cauliflower/Sweet Potato Puree.

The Salmon Cake Recipe.
The recipe doesn't specify, so we used Sockeye Salmon (made a half batch of this):

1-1/4 pounds of salmon after skinning (When processing the salmon it is OK to have some pieces that are larger than 1/4". It is important to avoid overprocessing the fish.

3 tablespoons plus 3/4 cup panko bread crumbs
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
2 tablespoons mayonnaise (we used light mayo)
4 teaspoons lemon juice (we went a bit heavier on the lemon juice)
1 scallion, sliced thin
1 small shallot, minced
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Pinch of cayenne pepper
1-1/4 pounds skinless salmon fillet cut into 1 inch pieces
1/2 cup vegetable oil

1. Combine 3 tablespoons panko, parsley, mayo, lemon juice, scallion, shallot, mustard, salt, pepper, and cayenne in bowl. Working in 3 batches, pulse salmon in food processor untill coarsely chopped into 1/4 inch pieces, about 2 pulses, transferring each batch to bowl with panko mixture. Gently mix until uniformly combined.

2. Place remaining 3/4 cup panko in pie plate. Using 1/3 cup measure, scoop level amount of salmon mixture and transfer to baking sheet; repeat to make 8 cakes. Carefully coat each cake in bread crumbs, gently patting into disk measuring 2-3/4 inches in diameter and 1 inch high. Return coated cakes to baking sheet.

3. Heat oil in 12 inch skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Place salmon cakes in skillet and cook without moving until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Carefully flip cakes and cook until second side is golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer cakes to paper towel lined plate to drain 1 minute. Serve.

This recipe is from Cook's Illustrated magazine, July & August 2011. It was awesome!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Yellowyak on July 26, 2014, 04:48:32 PM
That sounds great, we'll have to give that a try. I think salmon is the perfect fish, so tasty in many different recipes.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on July 26, 2014, 05:06:37 PM
That does sound good. I haven't had a good fresh fish or crab cake in years.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on July 26, 2014, 05:11:17 PM
We've got some King left in the freezer from my brother inlaw's last visit & we WILL make up some of that! :drool:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: LostViking on July 31, 2014, 05:35:21 AM
Artisan Bread


Bread Recipe,

Taken from the book,
Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day
By Jeff Hertzberg and Zoe Francois

Basic Bread Recipe,

3 cups luke warm water
One and one half tablespoons granulated yeast (2 packets)
One and one half tablespoons kosher or other course salt
Six and one half cups, unsifted, unbleached, all-purpose white flour,
Measured with the scoop and sweep method
Cornmeal for pizza peel

Mix the dough
Warm the water slightly, too hot kills the yeast. I use hot tap water added to bowl. I figure it is around 100 degrees, just what the recipe calls for.
In a five quart bowl add the yeast and salt to the water. One with a lid is good, not air tight. Don't worry about getting it to dissolve
Mix in the flour-kneading is not necessary. When you measure the flour don't press it down just scoop it with the measuring cup and sweep the top level with the back of a knife. Mix with a wooden spoon. It can be done with a mixer or processor with a dough hook. For my purposes I use a spoon. If it gets too difficult to mix with the spoon, reach in with wet hands and press the mixture together. Do not knead, not necessary.
Cover with lid, (not airtight) don't use mason jars or other tight fitting lids as there is a risk of bursting. Allow the mixture to rise at room temperature until it begins to collapse on top or at least flatten. Approximately 2 hours.

That's it! The dough is ready. After it has risen, throw it in the fridge.

Actual baking,

Prepare a pizza peel by liberally sprinkling it with cornmeal.

Sprinkle the surface of your refrigerated dough with flour. Pull up and cut of a 1 pound  (grapefruit size) piece of dough using a sharp knife. Hold the dough in your hands adding enough flour so it won't stick to your hands.

Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all four sides. Rotating the ball a quarter turn as you go. Most of the dusting flour will fall off. The bottom of the dough will appear to be a collection of bunched ends. This will cure itself during the rising period. This entire process should only take about a minute or less.

Rest the loaf and let it rise on a pizza peel. Place it on your cornmeal covered pizza peel. Allow the loaf to rest for about forty minutes. No need to cover.

Twenty minutes before baking, preheat oven to 450F.  With a baking stone on the middle rack. Place an empty boiler tray for holding water on the any rack that won't interfere with the rising bread.

Dust and Slash,
Dust the top of the loaf liberally with flour, which will allow the slashing knife to pass without sticking. Slash a quarter inch deep, cross, scallop, or or tick-tac-toe pattern into the top, using a serrated bread knife.

Baking,
After the twenty minute preheat, slide your loaf on to the stone with a slight forward jerking action. Quickly, but carefully pour a cup of hot water into the boiler tray. (I use an old metal ice cube tray) and close the oven door to trap the steam.

Bake for about 30 minutes. Or until crust is nicely browned and firm to the touch.
Because you used wet dough, there is little risk of drying out the interior.

Allow to completely cool on a wire cooling rack.

Store the remaining dough in the fridge and use it over the next fourteen days. The flavor will improve as the dough ages. When finished, you can scrape the bits of remaining dough into the bottom of the bowl and just mix new dough in. This will give it a slight sourdough taste.

That was from the book, not word for word.

This is from me.

This is the basic "Master Recipe" it works well. The book is 242 pages long it is well worth the money. I figure i can make a loaf of bread for roughly one third the price of bread from the store.

It is scary simple, fairly fast, keeps well. You can even freeze it in one pound loaves.
This will make approximately four one pound loaves.

If you have been reading my post in this thread you should have caught on by now I am all about versatility.

This recipe works pretty well as pizza dough too. Is it New York Or Chicago pizza dough? No! But it beats the heck out of a Boboli, Red Baron, or any other store bough concoction. I have made pizza outside on the Volcano,

With a slight adjustment I make rye bread, whole wheat bread, baguettes, rolls, garlic and cheese rolls, hot dog rolls you name it.

I highly recommend this book. Again no affiliation, it just works for me.

Problems you might encounter.
Sliding the dough off the peel onto the stone seem to scare folks a bit. The bread with stick to the hot stone so try to get the part of the loaf the is toward the back of the oven to hit the rear third of the stone. You "Will" screw this up occasionally. So what even if it looks funny, it still tastes great.

You will get cornmeal in your oven. If this bothers you, there is always that loaf of wonder down at the store, maybe? On that note. i call this stuff "Man Bread" it is artisan in style and texture. It is real bread. It is about as far from wonder as you can get.

Flour and water amounts will vary slightly, depending on humidity, and altitude. Adjust as necessary. I find I bake a loaf closer to thirty-six or seven minutes. 

Folks that haven't baked much can be apprehensive. I constantly hear stuff like how do you know how to do all this stuff? It it hard? I don't know if I could do this.

It's cave man stuff people. It is stuff we knew how to do, before we knew how to do stuff.
If you have a hot rock or even a stick and a fire, you can bake. The rest is just fluff. I can make a loaf of bread that some people would pay $6.00 for in my Dutch Oven on a wood fire.

If your first loaf sucks, and it might, but I doubt it. Stick with it. Everybody makes mistakes. Just like life bad things can occur, deal with it and keep trying.
(http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/i-wBrsCXj/0/L/IMG_2342-L.jpg) (http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/13478148_5RTMvp#!i=2833597027&k=wBrsCXj&lb=1&s=A)

You can stop here and say it don't work.

Or persist and get here,
(http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/i-zjpk4hB/0/L/IMG_2561-L.jpg) (http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/13478148_5RTMvp#!i=2767190278&k=zjpk4hB&lb=1&s=A)

I ate some of those burnt suckers and you know what? If things were really bad they would have tasted real good,

Good luck, and please share your experiences here. Good or bad. I think the new folks need to see that it isn't always perfect. That none of us had perfect feather sticks the first time. That we had tarps blow away, and couldn't get a fire lit when we were young.

I think we should share our failures more so people can see, and learn. Not just go get crushed and give up.


Besides this bread just plain rocks,
(http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/i-MDQd8dB/0/L/IMG_2943-L.jpg) (http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/13478148_5RTMvp#!i=2868822569&k=MDQd8dB&lb=1&s=A)
 
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on July 31, 2014, 10:35:48 AM
I am a fellow fan of that no-knead style of bread, too, LV. :).    Like you, I had my failures in learning to create bread in the D.O., but stubbornness has its virtues and DOES pay off when one eventually stops trying to make it 'rocket science.' :P.   In my experience, baking in the D.O. actually makes a better loaf than our oven in the kitchen at home.  If I preheat the D.O., prior to turning the doughball in for baking, I think is the real secret to success.....is that what you do, too? :shrug:

I started using this guy's methods and videos and I have posted the source before, but for those that haven't seen it and for your enjoyment, too.....

http://www.breadtopia.com/

EXCELLENT POST! :thumbsup:  I'm looking forward to more of your posts on Dutch oven related baking.  Iron pot wranglers always turn out to be the most popular people in camp at the end of the day! :hail: :stir: :banana:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on July 31, 2014, 11:06:04 AM
Looks great LV! I love that it's a DO recipe. We might be trying that sooner rather than later.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: LostViking on July 31, 2014, 11:52:28 AM
I love my Dutch Ovens Just so versatile.

Yes I always preheat top and bottom. I have not had success with charcoal. I use wood.

In New York it seems we have to have Fire Proof Charcoal. Even the Kingsford stuff. By the time it starts to ash over, it's about out. OK for burgers and such but tough for longer cooks. Whenever possible, I use cherry or Apple for meat.

I pretty much use wood for all my outdoor cooking. It's free and it is all over my property.

The yeast rolls above were cooked in a tad of leftover bacon grease. I'll post up some picts of the meal after you guys tell me where to put them. I didn't think they should go in here.

Another use for this dough is cinnamon sweet rolls. Make them up the night before and put in the fridge. The in the morning take them out and let them warm up for about an hour then pop them in the oven.

They never seem to last long enough to get picture of.,

That bread recipie and even the book are well worth trying. For the record,mI have no dog in the fight with the authuors. Just a happy customer.


Another use for the dough. I hate store bought hotdog rolls, these work much better for me. Especially given the fact that there is cheddar cheese baked right in.
(http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/i-bmwC7zH/0/L/IMG_2128-L.jpg) (http://lv1.smugmug.com/Other/Bushcraft/13478148_5RTMvp#!i=2505940439&k=bmwC7zH&lb=1&s=A)

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: LostViking on July 31, 2014, 12:05:12 PM
Wolfy,

The Rocket Science statement is so true.

Everybody is always making this stuff way harder than it has to be. I tell people it's caveman simple.
All you really need is wood and rocks. Wood for heat, rocks to hold the heat in. It is really all a modern oven is. Only in a more convienient less portable package.

I think everybody should know or learn how to bake bread. Prefferably in an off the grid fashion. Gas grill, dutch oven, Volcano Grill, Something.



Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on July 31, 2014, 12:29:07 PM
I couldn't agree more. :cheers:    Good bread, especially out around the campfire, in a miserable situation, cures a lot of woes! :fire1:  When it's cold, wet & miserable and your sitting under a dripping tarp with friends, popping a freshly baked breadstuff out of the old Dutch oven warms the very cockles of the hearts of all present!   When that aroma permeates the air, something 'special' occurs.....ambrosia, is how I remember ol' John Jobson describing it! :drool:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: crashdive123 on August 01, 2014, 03:46:26 AM
Last night's dinner was baked sockeye salmon seasoned with Chef Paul Prudhomme's Magic Salmon Seasoning, Cauliflower steaks with roasted red pepper sauce, leek - green pea and potato soup and fresh garden tomatoes.

Soup recipe

1 pound leeks, white part only, quartered lenthwise, sliced crosswise and washed well
2 (12 ounces) potatoes, peeled, quartered and sliced thin
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
5 cups chicken broth
2 cups frozen green peas
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced, plus parsley leaves for garnish
2 tablespoons fresh mint leaves, chopped, or a pinch of dried, crumbled
salt and pepper to taste

In a large saucepan cook the leeks and the potato in the butter over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, untill the vegetables are softened and add the broth.  Bring the liquid to a boil and simmer the mixture, covevered, for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the potato is very soft.  Stir in the peas, parsley and mint, season the soup with salt and pepper to taste and simmer for 5 minutes.  Puree the mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth.  Garnish with parsley and serve.

Cauliflower Steaks With Roasted Red Pepper Sauce Recipe

1 cup drained, bottled roasted red sweet peppers
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 clove garlic, sliced
1 large head cauliflower, with leaves removed
chopped green and or black olives (we used both)
cracked pepper

1.  In a blender or food processor blend or process red peppers, 1 tablespoon of the oil, vinegar and garlic until smooth.  Set aside
2.  Preheat oven to 400.  Place cauliflower, core side down, on a cutting board.  Beginning at the center, cut the cauliflower into four 3/4" thick slices.  Save remaining cauliflower for another use.
3.  In a 12" skillet heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat.  Add 2 of the cauliflower steaks.  Cook 3 minutes per side or until browned.  Transfer to a parchment paper lined 15x10x1 inch baking pan.  Repeat with remaining 1 tablespoon oil and cauliflower steaks.
4.  Roast, uncovered for 15 minute or until tender.  Serve cauliflower steakswith red pepper sauce and sprinkle with chopped olives.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on August 03, 2014, 05:55:31 AM
Sounds like some good eats Crash & LV...thanks for adding those


Wolfy my boy, for an o'le grizzled Farmer, you sure have a way with words... you can make anything sound good  :cheers:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on December 22, 2014, 09:31:22 AM
Went thru all 4 pg's of this thread and surprisingly I could not find a Beef Stew recipe. Now I'll admit that most folks probably have their own version but I'll add mine to this thread just so we have it covered, while I did add the pics in the "what did you have for dinner thread" I'll put it all together here.

I've been on a cooking in enameled cast-iron binge lately, for this recipe I used a 3qt D.O on the stove top, or as the Brits like to call it, the Hob. 8)

Good o'le slice of butter ( use your fat of choice ) I happened to have butter...Mooooo, heat butter to low med...
Cut up Beef to size you prefer...
In a bag, throw in a bit of flour and season the way you like, I used some ox-tail seasoning spice...
Toss beef in the bag and get it all coated...
Brown off meat in batches, I had around a 1lb of beef and it took two batches in this 3qt D.O, then put beef aside in a bowl...
Saute your onions ( 1 med sized ) and garlic ( 4 cloves ) in the D.O, then add your celery ( 3 stalks ) ...
Add your Beef back into the D.O and give everything a good stir...
Add your stock, I used Beef stock to just under level of contents...
Add your carrots ( 2 small )
Add potatoes ( 4 med ) and stir... plug in a kettle as you will need some warmed up water...
You don't need to boil the water you just want it warmed up a bit, everything I've read so far says to never add cold water to a hot enameled D.O, fill to just under potato level....
Now, turn the heat down to low and put the lid on. You want to cook this low and slow, After 20 min give it a stir and if necessary adjust the heat, you just want a little bubbling action, and with the lid on and set to low you should get it....
Cook for approx 2hrs, enjoy  :drool:

(http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb466/finigin/bsc2_zps7bf30c9d.jpg)

Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on December 22, 2014, 10:23:30 AM
That looks like a great meal for a cold day Zammer! :thumbsup:

I love beef stew and it is nice to have a recipe in here.
Title: Re: Just Recipes - The Holy Trilogy
Post by: Alnamvet68 on February 13, 2015, 05:41:46 PM
The Holy Trilogy Sandwich

A tasty sandwich with roast pork, ham, bacon, Swiss cheese, pickles and mustard.

Servings: 1

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes


Ingredients
2 slices of thick sour dough bread
1 tablespoon mustard
2 slices of swiss cheese
2 slices roast pork
2 slices ham, cooked
4 slices of thick bacon
2-4 slices pickle

Directions
1. Assemble the sandwich and grill in a panini press over medium heat until golden brown, about 2-4 minutes per side. Plate with a side of potato chips.
2. Serve with a tall Mojito or your favorite brew.

(http://i1295.photobucket.com/albums/b634/alnamvet68/ellatino.jpg) (http://s1295.photobucket.com/user/alnamvet68/media/ellatino.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on February 13, 2015, 05:47:13 PM
THAT sounds delicious! :thumbsup: :drool:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Yellowyak on February 13, 2015, 05:51:40 PM
That looks great, like a Cuban on steroid's, yummy.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: zammer on February 13, 2015, 05:52:46 PM
That looks like a great meal for a cold day Zammer! :thumbsup:

I love beef stew and it is nice to have a recipe in here.

Thanks Pdubs, it's a winter staple


Alnamvet68.... nice sammich man! thanks for adding to our humble little recipe thread, and welcome to BnB  :cheers:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Alnamvet68 on February 13, 2015, 06:02:03 PM
That looks great, like a Cuban on steroid's, yummy.

Yes, it's similar, but for a real Cuban sandwich, one has to have access to that fantastic Cuban bread that one has to eat the same day, and for that, you have to live in Metro Dade, Palm Beach county of Broward county. :'(
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on February 15, 2015, 09:19:02 AM
Wow! That is a tasty looking sandwich! You guys with cast iron pans can use WW's improvised sandwich press by using Tue bottom of a small pan on top of the sandwich with the big pan underneath. I have tried this and it works!
Title: Re: Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
Post by: Yellowyak on June 21, 2015, 06:42:50 PM
This is a recipe I sort of came up with on my own. It's an amalgam of several gumbo recipes. "gumbo" is an African word, meaning "okra". But this recipe instead uses file' powder to thicken it at the table, rather than okra in the ingredients. Purists will insist that if it doesn't have okra, it isn't gumbo. However the French Creoles in the country north of New Orleans made gumbo without okra all the time.

Anyhow, here goes...

Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

Ingredients
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup vegetable oil (or bacon grease)
1 bell pepper chopped
1 onion chopped
2-3 stalks celery chopped
2 medium boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut into 1" pieces
1 lb. smoked sausage cut into 1/4" thick rounds
1 bay leaf
2 small to medium cloves garlic, minced or pressed
Chicken stock - 2 or more cups
Tony Chachere's creole seasoning
salt and pepper to taste
Gumbo file' powder
Cayenne pepper
long grain white rice

Start by chopping your "trinity" of onions, bell pepper and celery, then put them together in a bowl and set them aside, along with the minced garlic. Then in a big cast iron skillet, brown the chicken and sausage well, and set aside.

In a big pot, add flour and oil (or bacon grease) and over medium-high heat, keep stirring until the flour turns chocolate brown. This is making a roux. You have to stir constantly or it will burn and you'll need to start over. Any black flecks of burnt flour will ruin the flavor.

As soon as the roux gets close to the chocolate brown color, add in the chopped vegetables. This will help prevent the roux from burning. Keep the vegetables moving in the pot just to be safe, for another 30 seconds to a minute. You want them to wilt and glaze a little. They will smell just awesome at this point.

After the veggies have wilted some, then you can add 2 cups of chicken stock, and then the chicken and sausage, and the bay leaf. Also add about 2 level teaspoons of the Tony Chachere's creole seasoning, and add about 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper. If you need more liquid, add just enough to barely cover the contents of the pot. You want them all to be wet, but not so much as to thin out the soup too much. Let this simmer on medium-low heat for an hour. After an hour, taste it and add Tony's seasoning until the heat level is to your liking, then add salt until the salt level is to your liking. Before serving, skim off the excess oil from the surface. Oxo makes a great oil separator for the purpose that is a lot easier than trying to scoop it all up with a spoon. Remove and discard the bay leaf.

While the gumbo is simmering for an hour, you can start your rice so it will be ready when the gumbo is done.

To serve, use wide brimmed soup bowls and place a scoop of white rice in the center of the bowl, then ladle the gumbo around the outside. You can sprinkle about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of file powder onto the gumbo, and a little more on the brim of the bowl and the top of the rice for a garnish. Do the same with a tiny bit of cayenne pepper for color.

This is best served with some french bread garlic toast.

This same recipe can be modified by eliminating the sausage, and using a lot less chicken stock. The chicken breasts are increased from 2 to 4. Brown them as before and set aside. Make the roux in a deep skillet instead of a pot. When the roux is ready, add the veggies and then just enough chicken stock to keep from burning, then simmer covered over low heat for an hour until the chicken is fully cooked and tender. Taste and season as before. Serve this over rice and you'll have a nice chicken fricassee.!

My wife asked me what I wanted for Father's Day dinner, I told her shrimp gumbo. I gave her this recipe and she cooked it up for me. She couldn't find the Gumbo File' seasoning, but it was still mighty tasty. Thanks for the recipe.

(http://i1302.photobucket.com/albums/ag129/yellowyak/misc/8a0975538cc93810bdb0657f0b82f510_zpsr5fvfrsi.jpg)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: PetrifiedWood on June 22, 2015, 09:03:51 AM
Looks good! You can also throw in some small oysters and crab meat to really make it nice. A lot of folks put tomatoes in the seafood gumbo.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: fuzzfarmer on January 21, 2016, 01:24:34 PM
This is an easy recipe for WOLFY'S DEER SUMMER SAUSAGE that I have 'diddled' with for years, but I think I'm finished messing with it now.  I just pulled it out of our recipe file to make up a batch with some burger from this year's buck.  Hope all you deer hunters give it a shot and let me know what you think.  We've received accolades from people that have had it and I've given the recipe out on other forums where it has been quite popular, too.  So, if you've got lots of deer burger to deal with, this is a great way to use some of it, but it works fine with beef burger, too.

3# deer burger
2 T liquid smoke
4-5 cloves crushed garlic....or MORE ;)
1 T whole mustard seed
3 T Morton Tender Quick
1 Cup water
1/4 t course-ground fresh black pepper
1/2 t onion powder
2 T brown sugar
1 T red pepper flakes

METHOD:
Mix all the ingredients together and pour over meat while mixing.......I use the dough hook on our KitchenAid stand mixer.  Form into two logs about 3" in diameter & 12" long.  Seal in foil & refrigerate for 24 hours. Punch holes in bottom of foil with a fork.  Place on broiler pan or cake rack on a sheet pan, so fat can drip out during baking.  Bake 1 1/4 hours @ 325 degrees.  Unwrap & cool.  Wrap with plastic wrap & store in refrigerator or freeze.

I mix up 6# at a time, because 3# just doesn't last long enough around here :stir:

This is kind of a 'basic' recipe that we have arrived at to suit different family members' taste 'prejudices', so feel free to experiment by adding different commonly added sausage ingredients that you may crave 8)

I may have to try this.  Love summer sausage, but had no idea how to make it.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: MississippiRifleman on March 30, 2016, 09:05:51 PM
My wife made me some of the best sandwiches when we were dating, and her recipe goes something like this:

Start with two slices of your favorite bread (I like sourdough for this one)
Add mayo, mustard, whatever you prefer
Add thin sliced turkey or ham, or both!
Add a leaf or two of your favorite lettuce (Romaine for me)
Add a thin slice, maybe two, of pear or (my favorite) Granny Smith apple
Top with second slice of bread
Press long enough to slightly toast the bread

The apple or pear slice adds a neat flavor to the rest of the sandwich, and is a great summertime midday meal with a cold hefe weizen.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on March 30, 2016, 09:23:10 PM
 :welcome: to the forum, from NEBRASKA!

Sounds like a good combo! :drool:    Thanks for the recipe. :cheers:

If you don't have a panini press, but you do have an old George Foreman grill in one of your kitchen cabinets, they do make a pretty decent substitute for a sammich like this. :thumbsup:


BTW.....if you get a little time, go to INTRODUCTIONS and tell us a little about yourself and some of your interests. :)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: MississippiRifleman on April 23, 2016, 10:37:12 PM
Tried this one from Kephart's "Woodcraft and Camping" and I think, judging by the clean plates, I might have a hit on my hands.

Woodcraft and Camping, pg. 356

Corn Batter Cakes -

1/2 pint corn meal
1/4 pint flour
1 heaped teaspoonful baking powder
1 heaped teaspoonful sugar or 2 molasses
1 level teaspoonful salt

After mixing the dry ingredients thoroughly, add cold water, a little at a time, stirring briskly, until a rather thick batter results. Bake like flapjacks. Wholesomer than plain flour flapjacks. These are better with an egg or two added, and if mixed with milk instead of water.

I used two eggs and enough milk to get the batter to drop neatly from a spoon, and cooked them in a greased iron skillet until the bubbles set on one side, then flipping them to the other. They eat like a cross between pancakes and cornbread, with the best qualities of each. I've rolled them up with fruit or preserves inside for a quick morning grab-n-go, and have eaten the leftovers broken up in a glass of warm milk.

Our forebears knew a thing or two about good vittles, I must say...
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: Unknown on April 24, 2016, 01:47:04 AM
did you use molasses or sugar?

These are one of my favorite foods. Plain and simple. I like them a bit more flapjacky so they crumble less when the plan is to precook at home. Pack 'em in a breadsack, waxpaper, or ziplock. Repackage a can of hatch chiles, precook some sausage, jelly, honey, butter... mmm mmm

I'm glad you posted this. I just got some fresh eggs. Lots of non GM :-X corn flour and grits on hand
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wsdstan on April 24, 2016, 08:04:57 AM
They sound good to me as well.

Three of them with a sausage link or two (or three) and a couple of eggs over easy and I am a happy camper.   :-*
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: MississippiRifleman on April 24, 2016, 09:41:14 AM
did you use molasses or sugar?

These are one of my favorite foods. Plain and simple. I like them a bit more flapjacky so they crumble less when the plan is to precook at home. Pack 'em in a breadsack, waxpaper, or ziplock. Repackage a can of hatch chiles, precook some sausage, jelly, honey, butter... mmm mmm

I'm glad you posted this. I just got some fresh eggs. Lots of non GM :-X corn flour and grits on hand

I used sugar, but I'm gonna try some local honey with the next batch.
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: marchone on November 27, 2018, 09:23:00 AM
This variation of a British-style curry uses unripe bananas to thicken it. Swapping cubed chicken breast, grouse or pheasant for the shrimp and scallops are other versions.

Seafood Curry

1 tablespoon Sun Brand or Bolst?s curry powder
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
6 cloves garlic, peeled, crushed and minced
1 whole celery heart, cleaned and chopped
1 large Spanish or white Bermuda onion, peeled and chopped
1 cup Noilly Prat dry white vermouth
2 cups light chicken broth
2 green unripe bananas, peeled and chopped
1 cup cream
1/2 lb small shrimp
1/2 lb sea scallops
2 tablespoons Thai nam pla or Vietnamese nuoc cham fish sauce
1 cup loosely packed mixed herbs*

Preheat a large shallow pan. Add curry powder and salt and toast lightly.
Add oil and garlic. Cook for 2 minutes over a medium heat. Do not brown.
Add celery and onion. Cook about 10 minutes to soften the vegetables.
Add the vermouth. Reduce by half.
Add the chicken broth. Reduce by half.
Add the bananas and cream. Continue to cook on medium heat till thickened. The bananas will have softened and melted into the curry.
Add the seafood. Cook till the shrimp are pink.
Stir in the herbs. Correct the seasoning with fish sauce.

Serve hot with steamed Jasmine rice, more fresh herbs*, dried coconut, raisins, raw cashews and Major Grey?s style mango chutney.

* Basil, tarragon, chives, cilantro.

Serves 4 to 6 persons

Note: If meat is substituted for seafood don't leave out the nam pla. It is an all purpose seasoning that adds great depth of flavor to most anything.
Title: Beer Bread
Post by: wsdstan on March 02, 2019, 03:20:57 PM
I did not search for this bread recipe so if it was posted earlier my apologies.

Beer Bread for the lazy.

A 12 ounce can of beer.  If you get 16 ounce cans drink 4 ounces of it and use what is left.
3 cups of flower. 
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup of sugar (you can use honey or brown sugar if you wish)  I use honey most of the time.

Mix all the ingredients above.  If you use self rising flour delete the baking powder and salt.

Melt a 1/2 cup of butter

Put the mix in a bread pan and spread it out to a uniform thickness.  Pour the melted butter over the mix letting it drizzle around all the top area.  The butter makes a crust on the top.  If you don't want a crust mix the butter into the bread dough. 

No rising, no nothing just put it in the oven, 

Bake for 1 hour at 375 degrees.  Put it on a rack and let it cool.

I check it at about fifty minutes.  i find that it usually can go an hour to an hour and 5 minutes in my oven.  This is, a heavy bread, and wonderful as is or toasted lightly with jelly or honey. 

(https://i.imgur.com/4hkezla.jpg)
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: wolfy on March 02, 2019, 04:46:28 PM
That sounds like it would be tailor made for a quick bake kettle bread, too. :stir:
Title: Re: Just Recipes
Post by: madmax on March 02, 2019, 05:06:21 PM
hmmmmm.  I might have to break out some cast iron next week.