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41
General Discussion / Re: Weather whether you like it or not
« Last post by wsdstan on January 16, 2019, 10:43:14 AM »
Hope that one peters out in California and doesn't get up where I live.  49' waves would be terrible. 

We are cold and headed to colder.  A humid 26 this morning at 6:00 AM but it felt a lot colder to me.  5 hours later it is only 28F.  We should miss the big snow in the forecast (I hope) and just have a trace here.  They are talking about  a high of 18 with snow on Friday.  Winter is a long time going this year.  Reservoir is froze tight, over a foot of ice in the middle.  For some reason the raccoons are out and about.  My wife got two this last weekend.  No skunks caught and I hope it stays that way. 
42
General Discussion / Re: Weather whether you like it or not
« Last post by Pete Bog on January 16, 2019, 06:19:54 AM »
earth.nullschool.ne t shows a storm out in the pacific, headed ashore. Wind at 66 mph and waves at 49' with a 17 second period. These are not peak numbers, they are averages. Holy crap. I suspect that's going to bulldoze its way into the Midwest before it peters out. I check this storm once or twice a day and it's not getting any friendlier. Hope you guys on the West coast are ready to hunker down for a nasty one. 
43
General Discussion / Re: Work Sharp Knife sharpener
« Last post by Unknown on January 15, 2019, 07:41:22 PM »
I didn't want to read all that. Looks like a lot of talk for fellers  that have maintained that a few seconds of butcher's steel is all it takes to maintain a sharp edge for years on end.... mmmm hmmm. Now we know. Sharp takes sharpening. Congrats. Not that is how I'd do it but you have proposed a temptation
44
General Discussion / Re: Work Sharp Knife sharpener
« Last post by Moe M. on January 15, 2019, 06:41:30 PM »
Well, Moe, you asked me in another thread how I liked my new WorkSharp knife sharpener, but I couldn't find the thread where you asked me. :P      This is probably a better place to answer your question, anyway. :shrug:

The gist of it is, I like it a lot! :banana:    As with any new tool, there is a learning curve, but I tend to read & follow directions, so I didn't have much trouble getting the feel of it.   The various 'most-watched' YouTube videos were quite useful, also.

I practiced on a couple of junkers before going to the knife-block for our eclectic collection of kitchen knives, and THAT was the defining moment.....I hate hand-sharpening long slicers and flexible boning knives....doesn't seem like I can maintain a consistent angle from handle to blade-tip.  For me, the rest of them are not a problem, but those two styles always have been.  With the WorkSharp it was a piece of cake.....they are sharper than they've ever been! :thumbsup:

One observation in my limited time at the bench using it was that it works best when I'm standing up, so I can look down and observe the angle of the blade/belt contact area.  The blade guide seems useful to start the angle correctly, but to rely on it entirely by striving to keep the off-side of the blade perpendicular & against the guide proved to be more 'help' than I needed to keep a constant angle.  In other words, just 'eye-balling' the angle seemed much easier and more effective for ME, but as they say on the interwebz......YMMV . :shrug:

'MOE APPROVED'......and now, WOLFY APPROVED!

  Glad to hear that it's working out for you Wolfy,  I bought mine to fix a specific problem knife, it's gone now but the Work Sharp is still on my bench,  I've never had a problem sharpening my outdoor and pocket knives and in a way find it relaxing,  but like you I don't like doing butcher, boning, and meat slicing knives, my fillet/fishing knives can be a PITA as well,  I still do the touching up and stropping on my bushcraft and hunting knives by hand, but I do my kitchen and utility knives with the WorkSharp, it's quicker and gives a much finer edge.   
45
General Discussion / Re: Work Sharp Knife sharpener
« Last post by Moe M. on January 15, 2019, 06:28:29 PM »
One of the stores out here in the frozen wasteland of western South Dakota has a couple of them on the shelf and a few supplies.  What grits are you using Craig?  The store only has coarse and nearly as coarse in stock but maybe that is all they make.

 Stan, the sharpener comes with a set of belts ranging from course to extra fine, a very easy to understand instruction manual, and a HD plasticized cardboard reference chart made to hang over or near your work bench that gives you choices as to what kind of edge you want for your specific knife, it's broken down in segments for folding/pocket knives, fixed blade knives, and various kitchen knives.
 It also addresses butcher, slicing, boning, and paring utility blades,  and it tells you what angle to adjust the guides for,  which belts to use to start out with depending on whether the blade is rough or dull, or just needs touching up, the Ken Onion model is a variable speed controlled machine, the speed is also adjustable with a dial knob, it also does scissors.
 About the belts, they are made for WorkSharp by several makers of commercial grinding and polishing belts such as Norton Co., they are like regular commercial belts made in layers,  in use as the belt wears it opens up a whole new grinding surface under the previous one, when you get to the bottom of the several layers it becomes a polishing belt, I've had mine for over a year now and have been sharpening not only my own knives but four out of my seven kids bring me their kitchen knives to sharpen as well, I bought a spare set of belts when I purchased the machine and I'm still using the original belts that came with the machine.
 I also suggest that if you're thinking of buying one, get the Ken Onion model, there's about a $50.00 difference between the base model and the Ken Onion edition, but there's a world of difference between the two,  for one thing, you can buy optional add on pieces like a knife making station that allows you to build a knife from scratch or reprofile or modify an existing knife.
 Another thing you might be really interested in is a tool grinder that attaches to the Ken Onion model, it comes with wider belts and courser grits for sharpening tools such a mower blades or removing rust and pits from steel tools, it works great for prepping rusted steel for welding, if I were a working farmer or rancher I'd for sure own one of those tools.
 Cost is very reasonable for what you get, first off it's all made in America right down to the belts,  I bought mine at my local Cabela's for $128.00, a spare set of belts was about $15.00, the tool grinding attachment cost me about $40.00 with a set of belts, and worth every penny,  I did end up getting a knife making station but haven't tried it out yet.
 Lastly, customer support and service from WorkSharp is great, if you have a problem, need advice on using their tools, or you need belts give them a call on the toll free number and they will solve your problem or get your parts in the mail the same day.
 
 No, I don't work for the company, but I will recommend their products anytime.
   
46
General Discussion / Re: Work Sharp Knife sharpener
« Last post by wolfy on January 15, 2019, 04:33:38 PM »
One of the stores out here in the frozen wasteland of western South Dakota has a couple of them on the shelf and a few supplies.  What grits are you using Craig?  The store only has coarse and nearly as coarse in stock but maybe that is all they make.


Heather is hosting some kind of women's club meeting upstairs and my WorkSharp is being held prisoner in the laundry room, so I can't give you a definitive answer.  I think the coarse belt in the group of 5 belts that came with the machine is 220 grit.  The finest sanding belt is 6000 grit, but I also bought a leather belt that you can charge with jewelers rouge, Flitz or any of a number of other paste-type abrasives for an even finer edge.   Easy to get flawless (under a 20X jeweler's loupe) convex edge that push cuts through paper like it isn't even there.....SCARY! :shocked:
47
General Discussion / Re: Work Sharp Knife sharpener
« Last post by Phaedrus on January 15, 2019, 03:11:33 PM »
The KO Worksharp looks pretty cool.  I don't have much use for one since I have about $3,500 worth of water stones, a bunch of diamonds and a couple belt grinders but the KOWS looks a lot more portable than my Kalamazoo! ;)
48
General Discussion / Re: Work Sharp Knife sharpener
« Last post by wsdstan on January 15, 2019, 01:22:37 PM »
One of the stores out here in the frozen wasteland of western South Dakota has a couple of them on the shelf and a few supplies.  What grits are you using Craig?  The store only has coarse and nearly as coarse in stock but maybe that is all they make.

49
General Discussion / Re: Work Sharp Knife sharpener
« Last post by wolfy on January 15, 2019, 12:33:22 PM »
Well, Moe, you asked me in another thread how I liked my new WorkSharp knife sharpener, but I couldn't find the thread where you asked me. :P      This is probably a better place to answer your question, anyway. :shrug:

The gist of it is, I like it a lot! :banana:    As with any new tool, there is a learning curve, but I tend to read & follow directions, so I didn't have much trouble getting the feel of it.   The various 'most-watched' YouTube videos were quite useful, also.

I practiced on a couple of junkers before going to the knife-block for our eclectic collection of kitchen knives, and THAT was the defining moment.....I hate hand-sharpening long slicers and flexible boning knives....doesn't seem like I can maintain a consistent angle from handle to blade-tip.  For me, the rest of them are not a problem, but those two styles always have been.  With the WorkSharp it was a piece of cake.....they are sharper than they've ever been! :thumbsup:

One observation in my limited time at the bench using it was that it works best when I'm standing up, so I can look down and observe the angle of the blade/belt contact area.  The blade guide seems useful to start the angle correctly, but to rely on it entirely by striving to keep the off-side of the blade perpendicular & against the guide proved to be more 'help' than I needed to keep a constant angle.  In other words, just 'eye-balling' the angle seemed much easier and more effective for ME, but as they say on the interwebz......YMMV . :shrug:

'MOE APPROVED'......and now, WOLFY APPROVED!
50
Hunting, Fishing and Trapping / Re: Okeechobee
« Last post by OutdoorEnvy on January 14, 2019, 03:39:50 PM »
LOL!  I'd be dremin of a teener if I was headed there!  Bring a long a huge swimbait in case you get bored with smaller ones.  Maybe a monster will cream the giant bait!  Good luck though!  Can't wait to hear how it goes.

 :popcorn:

 :canoe:

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