Blades and Bushlore

General Discussion => Food and Cooking => Topic started by: wolfy on September 18, 2013, 07:05:55 PM

Title: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 18, 2013, 07:05:55 PM
Here's a basic recipe for a Bisquick-type mix that we mix up to take on Boy Scout camping weekends.  Way cheaper than boxed Bisquick and very good, too!  It makes a pretty large quantity, but it originally came from some Scouting publication long since lost to the mists of time ???

I will list the basic recipe first, and then come back in future posts in this thread to tell you what quantities of other ingredients to mix with it to make things other than basic biscuits.  The batches are pretty big because it is meant for a Boy Scout Troop, but you can feed a bunch of folks at a weekend group camp or use your calculator to cut them down in size for smaller amounts.

BASIC MIX:

5 pounds all-purpose flour

2 1/4 cups dry milk

3/4 cups baking powder

1/2 cup sugar

3  tablespoons salt

2  pounds vegetable shortening

Mix all of the dry ingredients together thoroughly in a large bowl.   Add the shortening & cut it into the dry ingredients until it is a uniform mealy or crumbly consistency.  Store at room temperature in a tightly covered container.


I'll start off with....

BASIC BISCUITS:

3 Cups basic mix

3/4 Cup water

Form into biscuits.  Place in preheated Dutch oven, on a hot rock, in a reflector oven, twisted onto a preheated stick or bake like a bannock in a skillet tipped toward the fire to brown the top.  Takes about 10-15 minutes in my Dutch & reflector ovens.


I'll be back with more......I promise O:-)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Dano on September 18, 2013, 07:34:37 PM
Dang Wolfy, Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wsdstan on September 18, 2013, 08:09:06 PM
Thanks Wolfy, this will be just what I need for some new ideas.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 18, 2013, 08:30:57 PM
  Have you got a tip for an easy way to cut two pounds of crisco into five pounds of flour ?     :stir:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 18, 2013, 09:36:36 PM
  Have you got a tip for an easy way to cut two pounds of crisco into five pounds of flour ?     :stir:
Well, all I can tell you is I used an old potato masher in one hand and a pastry cutter in the other......seemed to get the job done ???    It works pretty well, actually O:-)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 18, 2013, 10:33:03 PM
+1 on the pastry cutter. I'd be lost without mine.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 19, 2013, 07:07:24 AM
  Have you got a tip for an easy way to cut two pounds of crisco into five pounds of flour ?     :stir:
Well, all I can tell you is I used an old potato masher in one hand and a pastry cutter in the other......seemed to get the job done ???    It works pretty well, actually O:-)

  Well,  that wouldn't work for me,  this is totally unrelated but you know how that works,  you gots to tell your story when it's there or you loose it.
  Potato mashers are one of those kitchen tools that are personal,  if you get one that works good for you it becomes precious and extremly valuable,  I had such a masher for about 40 years,  it was heavy duty, had wood scales like a fine knife,  and the design of it's business end was fantastic.
  About seven years ago we did our kitchen over,  new appliances, new cabinets, fresh paint on the walls,  and a new awning window put in over the sink,  everything was perfect,  except that when we unpacked our boxes of kitchen stuff (had to pack it in boxes to take down the old cabinets) we never found our cherished potato masher. :'(
  I bought a few since then,  used them once or twice then threw them out,  it seems all they're making these days is for looks and not for actually working,  I still have hopes that it's hiding somewhere in the storage room waiting to be found,  until then I continue to use my old fathful pastry cutter to do double duty.
 Actually it does a pretty good job of mashing,  but it could use a bit longer handle.   :)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 09:07:44 AM
...  I had such a masher for about 40 years,  it was heavy duty, had wood scales like a fine knife,  and the design of it's business end was fantastic.
  ...

Like you, I've been forced to use newer, 'improved' potato mashers over the years. But this is my ol' standby. I inherited it from my mother. I just used it yesterday to crush grapes for jelly.

I also use it to crush dried eggshells for my chickens.

Sorry for the derail....

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/OTYwWDEyODA=/z/R9wAAOxy%7EilSOkwM/$T2eC16F,%21%290FI,EoVmrVBSOkwMS4%29%21%7E%7E60_35.JPG?set_id=880000500F)


Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on September 19, 2013, 10:23:54 AM
Over the years, I have been on a quest to find the article involving making bread, using the flour sack as the mixing bowl.

I though it came from a cook book by Bradford Angier,( he has many)......the book in question was from the local library, described the process.
Don't have a name, and they actually tossed it out, as I was the only one that had checked it out for years......wish I could have gotten it.

The idea was to take your flour sack, make a bowl in the inside, add the other ingredients, mixing in the flour until you have a ball of bread dough.......It would only take as much flour as it needed.

Seems I may have missed the part of having the dry ingredients per mixed as described....Maybe?...

But thanks for posting...... this seems like a good possibility. 
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 10:45:26 AM
You know, I remember reading that, too! You must be an old phart, too ;D   I never did try it, but I do remember the process.  First you make a well in the rolled down flour sack, pour in the liquid ingredients (my recollection says it was a cup of sourdough), then stir that around in one direction with a clean stick or your finger until the wad of dough adhering to the stick reverses direction, then reach in and pull the wad off the stick, turn it over a couple of times until it's well covered with flour and no longer 'sticky'.  Dust a board with flour, then remove the wad from the sack and knead enough flour into the wad to make the dough the proper consistency for your bread or biscuits. :shrug:

                                                                    :tent:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on September 19, 2013, 10:59:47 AM
Yeah, dirt is too new for me.....
We tried many of versions at rendezvous, but always ended up putting it into a bowl.
Kinda worked.

The idea was to avoid bringing a the bowl.

I have purchased many of the books written by Bradford Angier, checked out many more, actually all that the local library has, including the satellites....no luck.

......some of the books I bought were from libraries all over, that some one had salvaged and sold them on the interweb......somet imes paid more for shipping than the book.

Some day some one will say, ....Oh yeah, I know what you are taking about....it's in "Thus and such" book....LOL
Good to know I'm not the only old phart, that as a "recollect" of that process.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 11:13:19 AM
It's possible that old Bradford was just a pre-Internet bullschidter, conjured the whole technique in his own mind, knew it wouldn't work and is now looking down and laughing at all of us who actually try it! :lol:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on September 19, 2013, 11:34:26 AM
LOL, guess I never thought of it that way.....as an outdoorsman, (that what they called us and them, back then), and of course many of my outdoorsy friends have been known to stretch the truth a mite......generally when ink-a-hall has been involved.....The perfect gag.......LOL

Oh well, the quest continues....One must have a quest.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 12:15:27 PM
You know, I remember reading that, too! You must be an old phart, too ;D   I never did try it, but I do remember the process.  First you make a well in the rolled down flour sack, pour in the liquid ingredients (my recollection says it was a cup of sourdough), then stir that around in one direction with a clean stick or your finger until the wad of dough adhering to the stick reverses direction, then reach in and pull the wad off the stick, turn it over a couple of times until it's well covered with flour and no longer 'sticky'.  Dust a board with flour, then remove the wad from the sack and knead enough flour into the wad to make the dough the proper consistency for your bread or biscuits. :shrug:

                                                                    :tent:
The tricky part of this bag method, rather than measured flour, is getting your leavening ingredient in, if you're using one (yeast, or salt, or soda, etc.). But it works fine for frybread, or hardtack.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 12:34:51 PM
You know, I remember reading that, too! You must be an old phart, too ;D   I never did try it, but I do remember the process.  First you make a well in the rolled down flour sack, pour in the liquid ingredients (my recollection says it was a cup of sourdough), then stir that around in one direction with a clean stick or your finger until the wad of dough adhering to the stick reverses direction, then reach in and pull the wad off the stick, turn it over a couple of times until it's well covered with flour and no longer 'sticky'.  Dust a board with flour, then remove the wad from the sack and knead enough flour into the wad to make the dough the proper consistency for your bread or biscuits. :shrug:

                                                                    :tent:
The tricky part of this bag method, rather than measured flour, is getting your leavening ingredient in, if you're using one (yeast, or salt, or soda, etc.). But it works fine for frybread, or hardtack.
Of course, that would be no problem at all if one were using the recipe in the OP at the top of the thread 8)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on September 19, 2013, 12:41:42 PM
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough).

Gonna make a lot of dough (get it?, dough), if I ever figure it out....Just think, make and sell videos, become the Wolfgang Puck of the Woods....TV shows, get to drink with Cathy Lee and Hoda ........WOW.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 12:50:12 PM
Then I pray you never figure it out :-\.   Becoming a raging wino is no aspiration to greatness! O:-)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 12:50:48 PM
Okay, here's my no-fail Italian bread recipe. It's really hard to mess it up, and slight variations only change the texture a bit.

2 1/4 tsp bread yeast
3 cu flour (I use unbleached 'white' flour)
1 tsp sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1 1/3 cu water

Mix into a soft ball. Rather than risk getting too much flour in the mix, I oil my hands (olive, or veggie) when handling sticky dough. Let this sit in an oiled bowl until about double in size. Knock it down and knead for about 10 minutes on a lightly floured, or oiled surface.

If you're making it at home, and are lazy like me, use your bread machine to do the 1st rise and kneading. Then pull out the dough (remember the oil on the hands?) and place it in a conventional bread pan.

Place the dough in your bread pan, D.O., whatever.  I sometimes use special French or baguette pans for long sandwich loaves. Let this second rising continue in a warm place until again about double in size, or the shape of the desired finished loaf.

Bake in a preheated oven at 350oF for 30-35 minutes, or until golden on top and hollow sounding when you tap on it.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 01:07:03 PM
That sounds good to me, too! :drool: :cheers:

P.S.   We like using unbleached flour, too.....I think it helps the texture of the bread a little. :shrug:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 01:11:26 PM
That sounds good to me, too! :drool: :cheers:
It's a good 'take out' recipe. Mix the dry ingredients in a gallon ziploc bag, then just add your water at your destination.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 01:24:40 PM
That sounds good to me, too! :drool: :cheers:

P.S.   We like using unbleached flour, too.....I think it helps the texture of the bread a little. :shrug:

If anybody researches how they "bleach" flour, they'd switch, too!
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 19, 2013, 02:27:38 PM
...  I had such a masher for about 40 years,  it was heavy duty, had wood scales like a fine knife,  and the design of it's business end was fantastic.
  ...

Like you, I've been forced to use newer, 'improved' potato mashers over the years. But this is my ol' standby. I inherited it from my mother. I just used it yesterday to crush grapes for jelly.

I also use it to crush dried eggshells for my chickens.

Sorry for the derail....

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/OTYwWDEyODA=/z/R9wAAOxy%7EilSOkwM/$T2eC16F,%21%290FI,EoVmrVBSOkwMS4%29%21%7E%7E60_35.JPG?set_id=880000500F)

   Oh my god,  that's my masher,  hopefully I'll find it someday.   
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 02:39:27 PM

   Oh my god,  that's my masher,  hopefully I'll find it someday.

Actually the handle is baklite. If you don't want to wait until yours rematerializes, try this link:

http://www.ebay.com/bhp/flint-potato-masher (http://www.ebay.com/bhp/flint-potato-masher)

or this one:

http://www.etsy.com/search?q=Flint%20potato%20masher&view_type=gallery&ship_to=US (http://www.etsy.com/search?q=Flint%20potato%20masher&view_type=gallery&ship_to=US)

Or get a new one from China - sold under the Ekco brand

http://www.amazon.com/Ekco-1094559-Potato-Masher-Stainless/dp/B005JB45TW/ref=sr_1_7?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1379623112&sr=1-7&keywords=potato+masher (http://www.amazon.com/Ekco-1094559-Potato-Masher-Stainless/dp/B005JB45TW/ref=sr_1_7?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1379623112&sr=1-7&keywords=potato+masher)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 03:08:31 PM
THREAD DERAIL :soap: :pissed: :sarcasm:



Actually, I don't care at all & welcome them, actually O:-).    It seems to be a problem for all of us in the 'Olde Phart's Club'.........age-acquired A.D.D, I guess :P.   Have fun, boys! :banana: :banana: :banana: :cheers:      I'll get the train back on the track later on, when I introduce another use for the basic mix in the flour barrel. O:-)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 03:28:55 PM
THREAD DERAIL :soap: :pissed: :sarcasm:



Actually, I don't care at all & welcome them, actually O:-) .    It seems to be a problem for all of us in the 'Olde Phart's Club'.........age-acquired A.D.D, I guess :P .   Have fun, boys! :banana: :banana: :banana: :cheers:      I'll get the train back on the track later on, when I introduce another use for the basic mix in the flour barrel. O:-)

It's all Moe's fault! He did it!  I can't help it if all the Ol' Phart kitchen tools are the same vintage, and look alike!   :P
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 03:32:20 PM
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on September 19, 2013, 05:09:40 PM
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.

Now that would make one more ingredient ...Milk....that could be included in the dry mix...so all you have to carry liquid would be the water.......
Good stuff thanks.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 05:14:42 PM
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.

Now that would make one more ingredient ...Milk....that could be included in the dry mix...so all you have to carry liquid would be the water.......
Good stuff thanks.
No worries.....the basic baking recipe in the O.P. includes dry milk O:-)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 06:16:22 PM
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.

Now that would make one more ingredient ...Milk....that could be included in the dry mix...so all you have to carry liquid would be the water.......
Good stuff thanks.
No worries.....the basic baking recipe in the O.P. includes dry milk O:-)

First thing I noticed! I was just giving a ratio, for different volumes. Good recipe, BTW!
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 06:22:55 PM
That was an FYI directed toward Hunter63, Ol' P......and 'Thank you'! :)



Stay tuned.....I'm digging out the pancake recipe, next.  :drool:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 07:09:08 PM
PANCAKES USING BASIC BAKING MIX


OK, as promised, here's the next installment in the series of recipes utilizing the mix at the top of the thread. 


5 Cups Basic Mix

3 Eggs

3 Cups Water

Bake on inverted, lightly greased Dutch oven lid, griddle or frying pan until edges start to dry & bubbles begin to break on the surface of the pancake, flip & serve hot, immediately as they come from the griddle with butter, real maple syrup or dusted with powdered sugar.  Add blueberries to the pancakes as you pour them for a real treat.   This recipe makes a LOT of pancakes, so you will probably want to cut it down a bit.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 19, 2013, 07:42:46 PM
It's possible that old Bradford was just a pre-Internet bullschidter, conjured the whole technique in his own mind, knew it wouldn't work and is now looking down and laughing at all of us who actually try it! :lol:

OMG! I started looking for my Angier books, and then got online to see if any were still available.
"On Your Own in the Wilderness" by Angier and Whelan is selling USED for $187.00! 
A new (condition), hardbound edition is for sale for a hair over $2300.00! 
Us ol' pharts might be sitting on a gold mine of old books....

Sorry, Wolfy....derail #2.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: WoodsWoman on September 19, 2013, 09:40:21 PM
My Great Aunt lived two blocks down from us , when we lived in a small town in Ia.  The house she lived in was the old farmplace house they had moved to town, just a year before I was born.  Her father built this house and he had migrated from Holland.   Her mother ( I guess that would be my great grandmother come to think of it...)   gave her instructions on how she wanted her kitchen to be.     

In the counter was two large pull out bins from counter top to the floor, you couldnt tell it was a pull out and that it tipped outwards.  She kept a 50# bag of flour in one.  She said the other used to be for 50# of sugar..but she didn't buy that much sugar at that time. Since it was just her and my Uncle Coon who was wheelchair bound.  But her as a child remembers both bins having huge bags of flour/sugar.

She'd still buy the flour in the big bag. The grocerman had to bring it in and put it into this pull out bin.   My aunt would open it out..open the bag and plop in the liquid or eggs and moosh them around with her hands right on top of the flour.  On top of the counter was a  butcher block ready for her to knead the bread or noodles once they got sticky.   Just behind this block was another longer pull/tip out bin that was about two feet long and against the backdrop.  This was for the wrapped bread loaves to stay in after being baked.

Next to this pull out bin was this deeeeep drawer.. it was sectioned off inside.  She had a large bag of cornmeal in one, and her smaller baking powder ect.  She said those used to come in larger bags back in the day.   The next section used to have coffee bean bags in it.  But when I knew her she just had a can of coffee grounds in that section. And one section had her blocks of lard which was in a lidded coffee can in it.  This was moved to the fridge in the summer time.   And I for some reason remember a waxed paper wrapped block of yeast.. I think that stayed in the drawer too.  She'd wedge a piece off to put into a glass of warm water. 

I used to get to do the mooshing as long as I would go get the pile of JC Penny or Wards catalogs for myself to stand on.  This bin was BIG..and I had all I could do to look over it and get my hand down with the wooden spoon to reach the top of the flour.   And for the spoon.. you use the handle...not the bowl part for mooshing (swirling).

When she passed away in the late 80's , she was in her 90's.  She was still using her 1930 something refrigerator and the TV which she hated to turn on still had the tubes in it.  It took five mins for it warm up before the black and white picture showed up. 

Anyway..another 'thread drift'..but this post brought in fond memories of Aunt Bert and her bread baking.   My Grandmother (Aunt Berts sister) lived across the alley from us and when those two started baking bread (my grandmother made buns for the church)  that end of town smelled GOOOOOOD... :)   

WW.


Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 19, 2013, 09:58:37 PM
Like I said, Marcia, I don't mind derails in my threads......it's more like sittin' around the campfire and just feeling comfortable in visiting about things that we all enjoy or remember.   In this case, I was enthralled with your story because I remember a 'kitchen cabinet', as my mother called it, out on the farm that was much the same as what you described!

Thanks for the memory AND the great post!
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on September 20, 2013, 09:31:31 AM
That was an FYI directed toward Hunter63, Ol' P......and 'Thank you'! :)



Stay tuned.....I'm digging out the pancake recipe, next.  :drool:

I noticed that milk and appreciate the ratio info....just thinking out loud.....
Thanks.

Guess I haven't looked for B. Angier's books lately.....that funny they are so much........
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 20, 2013, 09:39:02 AM
...
Guess I haven't looked for B. Angier's books lately.....that funny they are so much........
His "How to Stay Alive in the Woods", reprinted 1st Ed in 2001, is only $13.00. That's one of the first books I got, back in the '60's. Don't know what it's worth.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 20, 2013, 10:05:55 AM
...
Guess I haven't looked for B. Angier's books lately.....that funny they are so much........
His "How to Stay Alive in the Woods", reprinted 1st Ed in 2001, is only $13.00. That's one of the first books I got, back in the '60's. Don't know what it's worth.

  That's the one I have,  Green and orange rubber coated cover.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on September 20, 2013, 10:25:45 AM
WW, it's good see another reference to mixing in the bag.
The description of the kitchen is what I remember growing up, with the bins and all.....House built around 1900.
Thanks for the memories.

Was remodeled in the early '60 with all "New" cabinets....but some of the drawers, I saved and are in use to this day on a work bench.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 20, 2013, 07:13:30 PM
MUFFINS USING BASIC BAKING MIX

OK, here's the additions to make muffins for breakfast or a coffee break....


3 Cups Basic Mix

1/4 to 1/3 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1 Cup Water

Mix everything together and divide & pour into 16-20 heavy foil/paper cupcake papers or regular cheapo cupcake papers if you have a muffin tin.  Add whatever you like to add to the muffin batter that you like.  The boys like chocolate chips.  The leaders liked grated lemon or orange zest, chopped pecans, raisins, craisins etc.......anything you can dream up, actually.   Bake for around 20-25 minutes in your pre-heated Dutch oven or reflector oven.  Serve hot with butter or margarine.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 20, 2013, 07:50:46 PM
MUFFINS USING BASIC BAKING MIX

OK, here's the additions to make muffins for breakfast or a coffee break....


3 Cups Basic Mix

1/4 to 1/3 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1 Cup Water

Mix everything together and divide & pour into 16-20 heavy foil/paper cupcake papers or regular cheapo cupcake papers if you have a muffin tin.  Add whatever you like to add to the muffin batter that you like.  The boys like chocolate chips.  The leaders liked grated lemon or orange zest, chopped pecans, raisins, craisins etc.......anything you can dream up, actually.   Bake for around 20-25 minutes in your pre-heated Dutch oven or reflector oven.  Serve hot with butter or margarine.

   I like that one.   :drool:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 20, 2013, 10:08:33 PM
COOKIES USING BASIC BAKING MIX

My wife bakes a lot of these at our muzzleloader shoots and rendezvous.  Keeps all the kids in camp happy, gives them something to do and they learn how to do something useful at the same time.  It also makes her wildly popular!   

3 Cups Basic Mix

1 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1/4 Cup Water

1/2 Cup Vegetable Shortening

1 Teaspoon Flavoring (vanilla, lemon, peppermint, etc.)

You can add all kinds of other stuff to these cookies, too....like raisins, nuts, chocolate chips, M&Ms, etc.


You can just use as drop cookies or roll into a log and slice them off.  It makes a pretty good sized batch, but with kids around you'll have to mix up more. ;D.    Bake in a pretty hot preheated Dutch oven on a pizza pan or right on the oven bottom or a reflector oven shelf with a small cookie sheet for 10-15 minutes.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Professor on September 21, 2013, 06:42:28 AM
Thanks for this thread, Wolfy.  A few years ago, I was teaching ratio, proportion, and units conversion in my basic math class.  I had the idea of enlarging Betty Crocker's biscuit recipe into a "flour barrel" mixture. 

Obviously it was not a new idea, but here's what we came up with:
1 5-lb bag of flour
1/2 cup of baking powder
1 Tablespoon of salt
2 cups of dry milk powder
1 to 2 cups of Crisco or other shortening

I used a pastry blender to cut in the shortening.

The ratios of the two recipes vary a little.  I try to cut back on the shortening by using 1 cup.  The biscuits are not quite as tender, though.  For pancakes, I add a tablespoon of oil per cup of mix.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jE0pFhoC8nE
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 21, 2013, 09:44:03 AM
Long time, no see, Professor!.....& once again, I find myself in your debt for the valuable addition to one of my threads! 8)

As I said in the OP, the recipe I have came from some unknown Scouting-related, pre-internet source that one of our group of Scoutmasters came up with & handed out at one of our camp planning meetings.  I googled 'Bisquick Recipes' before starting the thread and find that there are lots of interpretations out there to choose from.  I decided to go with what we used because I knew that it worked and the 'group recipes' I'm bringing to this thread came with that faded, blue, MIMEOGRAPHED, (Whippersnappers will have to google that term ;D) & oil-spotted copy that I came across in my 'archives'. :-[
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: MnSportsman on September 21, 2013, 10:03:17 AM
It occurred to me, when looking thru this topic, that it may be useful to explain to some folks,the difference between "all-purpose" plain flour & "self rising" flour.

So...for those who were not aware...
"Self rising" flour already contains baking powder & salt, while "All purpose" or plain flour does not.


Since it may be, that someone not knowing the difference, may try to mistakenly use "self rising" flour, rather than plain old "all purpose" flour & likely ruin their batch of mix. So if you try any recipes posted here, particularly the BASIC MIX used in the OP, and use self-rising flour, you are possibly going to be disappointed in the results of your efforts. Maybe not, but increasing the amount of salt & baking powder is also a waste of your ingredients.

Just a thought to share, that may be handy for some folks to know... Since not everyone is a "baker".


Have fun!
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 21, 2013, 10:10:08 AM
Very true......and 'thanks', JB!





........but if you read the OP, I DID specify 'all purpose flour' 8)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 21, 2013, 10:30:57 AM

  All this talk of Baking mix gave me a craving for biscuits,  so I made some and they turned out great,   I used 1-1/2 cups of All Purpose Flour,  2-tsp. of baking powder, 1-tsp. of baking soda, 1/2-tsp. of salt,  2-Tsp. of cold hard butter cut in sm. pieces and then cut into the flour,  and enough milk to form a soft dough.
  I used a little extra flour to be able to take the dough from sticky to dry enough to handle,  and I folded and turned the dough several times on a floured board,  then used a floured water glass to cut out round biscuits,  set into a 425F. oven until golden brown,  they puffed up and browned perfectly.

  Thanks everyone for the incentive.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: MnSportsman on September 21, 2013, 10:31:43 AM
Yes wolfy, I read the OP... more than once, and it was part of why I posted about the difference. I also searched the topic to make sure I wasn't repeating anyone else. ;)
   Long ago, my sons were taught the difference, after making the mistake of bringing home "self rising", after asked to pick up plain "all purpose". or vice versa.. I don't remember which. But the reason they gave us for their selection, was that the one they picked up was the "cheaper" brand. So, that was the one they grabbed from the shelf. It was not the type desired at the time for the recipe. So, based upon that experience, I thought it might be nice to make others aware of the differences. Some who read this that may be inexperienced in baking and food preps., decide to try the recipes here & go to pick up the flour to try, or just grab some "flour" to try this, make not know about those differences. Then possibly get a different result than the desired one.
 :) 


Just wanted to help.


Edit: yup... tried to correct some spelling/grammatical mistakes. I think I got it correct now
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 21, 2013, 10:42:31 AM
.......and you did, JB!  Thank you!


I would also like to note that if you do a 'search' on here for 'bisquick', lots of Moe's posts will be highlighted!   That would be another good source of information concerning good tasting recipes utilizing THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL mix O:-)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: kanukkarhu on September 21, 2013, 10:46:42 AM
Wuffy, you know I have the attention span of a gnat...

What was I going to say??? 

Oh yeah, I read the entire thread and enjoyed the thread drift stories - a lot.  I mean, that part about potato mashers was EXCEPTIONALLY moving... ;)   (Seriously, great stuff)

But I wanted to tell you that this great idea of a basic recipe and adding/modding it strikes me as "modular", useful and valuable.  I plan on taking your posts and putting them all together when your finished.  I kinda wish it was all together somewhere minus the driftage...

Good stuff.  Thanks heaps. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 21, 2013, 08:52:47 PM
OK,KK, 8) here's the next recipe on the list using the Basic Baking Mix.....

COFFEE CAKE USING BASIC BAKING MIX

3 Cups Basic Mix

1 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1 Cup Water

Blend this mixture and pour into your greased Dutch oven....a 12" is about perfect for this recipe.  Then in a seperate bowl mix together:

3/4 Cup Brown Sugar

4 Tablespoons Butter

2 Teaspoons Cinnamon

Sprinkle this topping as evenly as you can on top of the cake batter and bake in a moderately hot oven for around 30-40 minutes.  If you like chopped pecans, add these toward the last half of the baking period, as they tend to get a little too brown.  This is a 'coffee' cake, but it's pretty danged good with a tall glass of good cold milk, too! :thumbsup:

Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: kanukkarhu on September 21, 2013, 10:57:05 PM
Thanks Wolfy! I enjoy just thinking about doing these up... I can almost smell 'em!

(And by the way, I was serious about enjoying all the comments - this is truly a warm and fuzzy thread! Just the kind of stuff I missed the most...) :thumbsup:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 21, 2013, 11:01:43 PM
Thanks Wolfy! I enjoy just thinking about doing these up... I can almost smell 'em!

(And by the way, I was serious about enjoying all the comments - this is truly a warm and fuzzy thread! Just the kind of stuff I missed the most...) :thumbsup:
Being a carbs junkie, nothing says 'warm and fuzzy' better that the smell and taste of fresh bread right out of the oven.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 21, 2013, 11:13:56 PM
One of the reasons my wife married me is because I'm so warm & fuzzy O:-)     I'm glad to hear you're enjoying the thread & just proves that old Pillsbury jingle must have some merit.....Nothin' says lovin' like somethin' from the oven! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Professor on September 22, 2013, 07:55:56 AM
Long time, no see, Professor!.....& once again, I find myself in your debt for the valuable addition to one of my threads! 8)

As I said in the OP, the recipe I have came from some unknown Scouting-related, pre-internet source that one of our group of Scoutmasters came up with & handed out at one of our camp planning meetings.  I googled 'Bisquick Recipes' before starting the thread and find that there are lots of interpretations out there to choose from.  I decided to go with what we used because I knew that it worked and the 'group recipes' I'm bringing to this thread came with that faded, blue, MIMEOGRAPHED, (Whippersnappers will have to google that term ;D) & oil-spotted copy that I came across in my 'archives'. :-[

I found a similar "flour barrel" recipe in a Dutch oven cookbook; and it, too, had slightly different proportions of the main ingredients.  I also like the small cookbooks that were published  by the makers of different brands of baking powders, because they have so many different recipes all using the same basic ingredients.

Another way to make a basic mix was all measured "by hand."  Use one mounded hand full of flour, a 5-finger pinch of sugar, a 4-finger pinch of baking powder, and a 3-finger pinch of salt.  Use enough water to make a dough, then shape the dough into biscuits on a floured corner of a canvas tent flap!  Don't worry about shortening; just bake your biscuits in a frying pan with a little bacon grease.

Keep those "flour barrel" recipes coming!

Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: WoodsWoman on September 22, 2013, 08:33:19 AM
Professor, would you mind explaining that last bit?  The part about baking in a fry pan with bacon grease?  ( I have no idea where this darker font came from).

Am I frying these biscuits, do they need to be flipped like a pancake then?

WW.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Professor on September 22, 2013, 12:41:14 PM
Professor, would you mind explaining that last bit?  The part about baking in a fry pan with bacon grease?  ( I have no idea where this darker font came from).

Am I frying these biscuits, do they need to be flipped like a pancake then?

WW.


You could bake them in a regular oven, put a lid on the skillet and pile coals on top, or you could stand the skillet on edge by the fire to bake the tops.

One guy showed building your fire between and atop 2 parallel logs spaced wide enough to allow the skillet to sit between them. A green stick across the logs tilts the skillet handle up and gets lots of heat on the biscuit tops.

You could also flip them; that's the way I do bannock over some slow coals, and on the kitchen range at home, too
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 22, 2013, 02:50:26 PM
Professor, would you mind explaining that last bit?  The part about baking in a fry pan with bacon grease?  ( I have no idea where this darker font came from).

Am I frying these biscuits, do they need to be flipped like a pancake then?

WW.


You could bake them in a regular oven, put a lid on the skillet and pile coals on top, or you could stand the skillet on edge by the fire to bake the tops.

One guy showed building your fire between and atop 2 parallel logs spaced wide enough to allow the skillet to sit between them. A green stick across the logs tilts the skillet handle up and gets lots of heat on the biscuit tops.

You could also flip them; that's the way I do bannock over some slow coals, and on the kitchen range at home, too
Tip your skillet, but also tent 1/2-2/3 of it with foil to create a "baker's oven", AKA reflector oven.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Professor on September 22, 2013, 07:14:26 PM
This thread really got me thinking! I remembered a small cookbook I bought several years ago at an antique shop.  It is called 77 Recipes using Swift'ning Make Your Own Mix which is about the same as Wolfy's Flour Barrel.  Since it was published as an advertisement, you can guess that it uses quite a good quantity of Swift's shortening: 2 cups of Swift'ning to 9 cups of flour.

Some of the 77 recipes are a bit repetitious, like corn pancakes and corn waffles.

Here's a good one, though:

Baked Fudge Pudding

1 1/2 cups of Wolfy's Flour Barrel
1/2 cup of sugar
2 Tablespoons of cocoa
3/4 cup chopped nuts (optional)
1 teaspoon vanilla

Add water to make a thick batter, then pour into 8 x 8 inch baking dish ( or a small Dutch oven)

Over this batter sprinkle 1/4 cup cocoa, 3/4 cup of brown sugar and pour 1 1/2 cups of hot water over all.  Bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes.

While cooking, the cake (kind of like a brownie) comes to the top, and a rich fudge sauce migrates to the bottom. This is one of my favorite recipes, but it is RICH! Eat it warm with some vanilla ice cream. 

Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 22, 2013, 07:21:47 PM
Now, THAT sounds good!  Of course, one would need a large tankard of cold milk to accompany it :thumbsup: :cheers: (yellow tankards filled with cold, frothy milk) ;D
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Professor on September 22, 2013, 07:47:28 PM
Yes, cold milk is very good with it! A similar recipe is also in the 1950 Betty Crocker Cookbook and I have found it in Bisquick cookbooks, too.

I have made this several times at camp in a Dutch oven with good results.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 23, 2013, 03:22:56 PM
OK,KK, 8) here's the next recipe on the list using the Basic Baking Mix.....

COFFEE CAKE USING BASIC BAKING MIX

3 Cups Basic Mix

1 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1 Cup Water

Blend this mixture and pour into your greased Dutch oven....a 12" is about perfect for this recipe.  Then in a seperate bowl mix together:

3/4 Cup Brown Sugar

4 Tablespoons Butter

2 Teaspoons Cinnamon

Sprinkle this topping as evenly as you can on top of the cake batter and bake in a moderately hot oven for around 30-40 minutes.  If you like chopped pecans, add these toward the last half of the baking period, as they tend to get a little too brown.  This is a 'coffee' cake, but it's pretty danged good with a tall glass of good cold milk, too! :thumbsup:

  Wolfy,  not to steal your thunder,  but Your coffee cake sounded too good to not hurry up and make one,  however I didn't have enough "baking mix" made up to fill the whole recipe,  so I took some artistic license and used all purpose flour and made a few slight changes.
  For anyone wanting to make Wolfy's wonderful coffee cake with plain flour at home in your oven, you can give this a try.

  2- cups of All Purpose flour.
  1/2- cup of sugar.
  1-1/2 teaspoons of Baking Powder.
  1/2 tsp. of salt.
  1 Lg. egg.
  1/4 cup of melted butter.
  3/4- cup of milk.

     Topping:

   4 Tbsp. of melted butter.
   1/2- cup of brown sugar.
   1- teaspoon of Cinnimon.

     Drizzle:

   4-Tbsp. of confectioners.
   3-Tbsp. of water.
   2- drops of Vanilla Ext.

  *  Blend Topping mix together and set aside.
  *  Mix dry cake ingredients with milk, egg, and melted butter.
  *  place batter in a buttered and floured baking pan.
  *  pour Topping over batter and using a wooen spoon handle swirl the topping mix to work a little into the batter mix.
  *bake at 375F. for 30 ~ 35 minutes,  check for doneness with a tooth pick.

  * after the cake cools,  mix the drizzle and using a spoon, drizzle over the top of the cake.

   Enjoy.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 23, 2013, 04:00:39 PM
Sounds GREAT, Moe!   I'm glad you 'modified the 'Basic Mix' recipe......that's kind of what I'm hoping people will do with these VERY basic recipes that were supplied on that old mimeographed handout that I found.  Artistic license and a bit of imagination, like you used there & the Professor added above, makes these simple recipes a 'foundation' for better end results!  Thank you for the tips and ideas!
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on September 23, 2013, 06:17:11 PM
Sounds GREAT, Moe!   I'm glad you 'modified the 'Basic Mix' recipe......that's kind of what I'm hoping people will do with these VERY basic recipes that were supplied on that old mimeographed handout that I found.  Artistic license and a bit of imagination, like you used there & the Professor added above, makes these simple recipes a 'foundation' for better end results!  Thank you for the tips and ideas!

  Thanks Bud,  it's your recipe,  and you were the inspiration,  you know me well enough to know that it's tough for me to post recipes because I learned to cook from my folks, they never measured anything,  and they were always improvising to suit what we had in the pantry,  so when I post recipes here I have to make it and measure the ingredients first before posting.
  My oldest daughter moved out to Arizona about a year and a half ago,  and she get a little home sick once in a while,  she skipes with my wife a few times a week and has been bugging me to send her some of my recipes,  I haven't done it because she's not a cook, she follows directions,  there's a difference,  I honestly don't know what to tell her for measurments,  with me it's a little of this and palm full of that,  a pinch and a dash.
  So today she calls and says she needs my "recipe" for my Chili "Now",  I told her "here's my best guestimate,  good luck",  I should know in a couple days.   :)

  I really didn't change your recipe,  I just did how I was tought,  improvise with what you have,  my wife is not a coffee cake person,  but she loved it,  some of the kids were coming for a visit tonight,  when I asked her how she liked it,  she said to hide it so the kids don't see it.   :) 
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on September 23, 2013, 09:55:29 PM
... I honestly don't know what to tell her for measurments,  with me it's a little of this and palm full of that,  a pinch and a dash.
  ...
As one pre-X-Gen to another, here ya go, buddy:

http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,6922.msg125812.html#msg125812 (http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,6922.msg125812.html#msg125812)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: WoodsWoman on September 26, 2013, 09:06:17 PM
Tonight I made a homemade chicken noodle soup and it was a bit on the watery side.  I thought of your flour barrel mix and went looking for my bisquick box. :)   The dumpling recipe on it says 2 c. mix and 2/3 cups milk.   I cut it down to one cup mix and used 1/3 cup water instead.  I wanted to know if it was something I could make out of a bannock or your flour barrel mix idea to make dumplings in just boiling water or water with a bullion.   They turned out really good... using water instead of milk.   So now if I make your flour barrel mix and have only that in a baggy with me in the great outdoors I know I could at least make something to fill the belly with warm dumplings in boiling water.  I just hope I'd have some bullion with me.

Oh ya..  10 mins on top of boiling water and 10 mins under cover on simmering water.   :)

WW.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 26, 2013, 09:14:00 PM
Yes, that FLOUR BARREL recipe works great for dumplings....we use it all the time when we boil up a chicken & vegetable soup/stew in the Dutch oven or even a covered pot.  Sometimes we add a little dried chopped parsley to them, too......adds a little color and flavor. :)
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: WoodsWoman on September 27, 2013, 04:40:56 AM
ahh.. parsely  that's the little 'something something' my dumplings could have used.  :)    Maybe a pinch of poultry seasoning too....   darnit now I gots to make more... :)


WW.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on September 30, 2013, 09:07:17 PM
OK, gang....this is the last of the recipes in the list that I can read legibly.  The end of the page didn't copy so well and it's faded besides.  Ol' A.B. Dick didn't intend for his copies to last forever, I guess. ???

CAKE USING BASIC FLOUR BARREL MIX

4 Cups Basic Mix

2 Cups Sugar

2 Eggs

1 1/3  Cups Water

2  Teaspoons Vanilla, Lemon or Other Flavoring


Beat the eggs & add them to the other ingredients, then beat the batter well to get rid of the lumps.  Pour in a greased and floured Dutch oven.  Bake in a medium hot oven for about 30-40 minutes and test with a sliver of wood to see if it comes out clean.  The top should spring back when you press it with your finger on top when done.  Frost with your favorite frosting after cooling on a rack.

We used this basic cake mix for baking pineapple upside-down cake, too.  Just add pineapple rings to a butter & brown sugar mix in the bottom of the oven before adding the batter.   Used it for fruit cobblers, too.  Use your imagination for other things you can dream up for desserts.....have fun with it!

That's all I can read here on the old mimeographed sheet, so add any other recipes here that you can come up with that you like.  Most all of the Bisquick recipes you find on the 'net are fair game & will work fine with this BASIC FLOUR BARREL MIX, so feel free to add them.  The more, the merrier!  :banana: :banana: :banana: :banana:

                                                                  :tent:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Moe M. on October 03, 2013, 06:48:08 AM

  This is turning out to be a great thread,  I think it's especially important for folks that are just being introduced to the ways of the trail,  and maybe a help to those who aren't comfortable trying to actually cook real meals over natures heat but instead boil water and add a package of dried stuff.
  Ingredients like Wolfy's basic flour barrel mix can be used in so many different cooking applications it's one of those things that everyone should be knowing of,  matter of fact this thread ought to be a Sticky at the head of this section.

  That said,  show me a woods bum that hasn't tried to get a good Bannock recipe to suit his specific tastes,  we add a little sugar,  some put nuts and berries in it,  still others will add Cinnamon and raisins,  all because Bannock is pretty darned bland all by itself,  but it's bread, and who doesn't like bread.
  Being set in my ways I don't fool with Bannock,  mainly because I never knew what bannock was until I started reading into "bushcraft",  it turns out that I've been making it since I was  kid,  we just called it biscuits or dumplings,  and we made it mostly with Bisquick or a home blended mix such as Wolf'y Flour Barrel Mix.
  I'm perfectly happy with the way I make mine the same boring way all the time,  although I have made a slight change now and then they still end up being the same "Drop Biscuit" recipe that I got from my folks when I was barely big enough to reach the top of the kitchen counter.
  Biscuits to me are a staff of life thing,  sometimes you get hungry, other times you just want a comfort snack,  for me that's usually some drop biscuits,  it takes a couple of minutes to mix and only 10 minutes in a 425 F. oven,  or 15 minutes in a make shift camp oven by the fire,  or you can pan fry them in your favorite skillet.
  My favorite way to make them is starting with about a cup of backing mix,  add a quarter cup of real Stone Ground Yellow (or white) corn meal,  a pinch of salt,  and a shake of Mrs. Dash,  then I use milk enough to make a thick batter or loose dough, which ever suits you (in camp I use water), once mixed use two teaspoons (one to scoop up the batter,  the other to roll it off into your baking pan,  they are done when the tops are golden brown and crispy,  I like mine with cool butter.

  ** however you season your "drop biscuits" is up to you,  but try adding the cornmeal (stone ground), it's really worth it.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on April 19, 2015, 06:30:53 PM
PEANUT BUTTER DROP COOKIES

2-1/2 cups of the BASIC FLOUR BARREL mix
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/3 cup milk
1 egg
1 tsp. oil
1 tsp. vanilla extract
Preheat oven to 350*....medium oven

Combine all ingredients.  Stir until well blended.  Drop by teaspoon on ungreased baking sheet.....a pizza pan works good in the Dutch oven or just bake 'em right on the bottom of the D.O.  Sprinkle with sugar (optional).  Bake 10-15 minutes.  Keeps the munchkins happy! ;D

Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Yellowyak on April 19, 2015, 06:55:03 PM
That sounds like a great recipe Wolfy. And thanks for bumping this thread, I need to make up a batch and give the mix a try, so much easier than taking all of the base ingredients on an outing.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on January 17, 2016, 02:10:14 PM
You can substitute the recipe mix in THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL baking mix in the OP for store-bought baking mix, like that from Bisquick or Jiffy Mix, too.  I just bumped the Jiffy Mix thread because they are putting out a revised FREE cookbook and thought this would be a good place to put the ordering information, too.  I just received my updated cookbook and if it wasn't below zero outside, I would be preheating my Dutch oven, right now! :drool: :thumbsup:

http://www.jiffymix.com/bookorder.php
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Orbean on January 29, 2016, 09:14:08 AM
I make tortillas a lot when camping. For every cup of flour add a marble size of lard (has to be lard), a pinch of salt, then add enough water to make a stiff dough that is not sticky. Roll out real thin on a floured cutting board and cook in a cast iron pan (has to be cast iron) that is very hot. In ten or so minutes you can make a good stack. Add a pinch of baking soda and you have sopapilla dough. Roll dough out in a circle ( the dough can be a little thicker than for tortilla) cut into quarters and fry in hot lard or any cooking oil.
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: Old Philosopher on January 29, 2016, 01:51:15 PM
Haha! Another "Energizer Bunny" thread!

I just discovered an awesome bread recipe that should be easily adapted to campfire cooking.  Instead of the "poor man's Dutch oven" in the recipe, we could get really radical and use a REAL Dutch oven.  :P

So...here's the procedure for this no-knead bread formula:

12 oz warm water
1 tsp bread yeast
1 1/2 tsp salt
3 cu all purpose flour. (I prefer unbleached 'white' flour myself)

TWO standard sized baking loaf pans. Grease one lightly (this is the bottom pan), and you just need to grease the upper inside edges of the 2nd one (this is the top to your 'Dutch oven'). Set aside.

Warm your mixing bowl so as not to cool off your water
Pour the warm water into the bowl. (no more than 90 deg F so you don't kill the yeast)
Add yeast, salt and flour.
Mix it together into a stiff batter. I like using the handle of a wooden spoon, instead of the blade end.

Cover the bowl and put it somewhere warm, away from drafts for 1 1/2hrs for the dough to 'proof'.  It should double in volume.
Use the spoon handle again to 'degass' (beat down) the dough.

Roll the dough into the bottom loaf pan. Cover with the other pan inverted and clamp the ends with metal document/paper fasteners.
Let it proof again for about 30 minutes.

Bake at 400 deg F for 30-35 minutes.
Remove top pan and bake another 5-10 minutes to form a golden top crust.

Excellent texture for all sorts of sandwiches, grilled cheese, or French toast.

Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: BigHat on March 14, 2016, 03:27:43 PM
this thread NEEDS TO BE A STICKY!!!!!

do you hear me 'Creek? seriously, sticky already, it's about BREAD man!
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: hunter63 on March 14, 2016, 06:29:30 PM
FYI....some of Bradford Algiers books are $.01 cent......Plus $3.99 shipping....guess the prices went down....
 http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0811717178/ref=dp_olp_all_mbc?ie=UTF8&condition=all
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on February 10, 2018, 07:05:06 PM
This recipe fits a standard 12 inch Lodge Dutch oven.  It works great for a family or a couple of tents full of Scouts.  :camp:  :camp:

BREAKFAST CASSEROLE

1 cup Basic Baking Mix
1 lb. breakfast sausage
1 medium onion, diced
1 medium red pepper, diced
4 eggs
1-1/2 cups milk.....powdered works OK
1 lb. frozen cubed hash browns, thawed
2 cups sharp cheddar cheese, shredded (divided)
salt and pepper
Grease & preheat a 12 inch Dutch oven. 

Cook sausage first.  Then add onions and red peppers.  Cook until sausage and onions are lightly browned.  Drain and set aside.  In separate bowl, blend eggs, milk and baking mix.  Pour the mix in with the sausage mixture, hash browns and 1 cup cheese.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Mix well.  Pour back into Dutch oven.  Bake 25 - 35 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.  Sprinkle with remaining cheese and return to oven until melted. :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool:
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wsdstan on February 11, 2018, 08:48:13 AM
Well it sounds good.  I am on a diet so everything sounds good.

With a Dutch Oven and this recipe how many coals do you put on top?
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on February 11, 2018, 10:26:42 AM
Well it sounds good.  I am on a diet so everything sounds good.

With a Dutch Oven and this recipe how many coals do you put on top?

I really don't know because I gave up counting briquettes long ago.....I concentrate more on percentage of lid coverage and follow the creed of the 'ring method,' which is MUCH SIMPLER and works EVERY time with briquettes or hardwood coals.   Think more of spot placement and keeping the coals AWAY from the center of the oven's bottom AND top, because those are the areas that will cook faster and burn first.

Go to post #146 on page 3 of the 'stickie' DUTCH OVEN CAMP RECIPES where you will find a chart on heat control in ALL sizes of Dutch ovens.....shoot for a temperature of around 350-400 degrees for this recipe.

The chart should show up here, too.....

http://www.susquehannaironmasters.com/uploads/1/4/1/1/14111788/1351873538.jpg
Title: Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
Post by: wolfy on May 20, 2019, 10:36:57 AM
Over the years, I have been on a quest to find the article involving making bread, using the flour sack as the mixing bowl.

I though it came from a cook book by Bradford Angier,( he has many)......the book in question was from the local library, described the process.
Don't have a name, and they actually tossed it out, as I was the only one that had checked it out for years......wish I could have gotten it.

The idea was to take your flour sack, make a bowl in the inside, add the other ingredients, mixing in the flour until you have a ball of bread dough.......It would only take as much flour as it needed.

Seems I may have missed the part of having the dry ingredients per mixed as described....Maybe?...

But thanks for posting...... this seems like a good possibility. 


I finally ran into Daniel Beard's reference to mixing quick-bread in the open top of a bag of flour.....

www.survivorlibrary .com/library/american-boys-book-of-camp-lore-and-woodcraft.pdf

How To Make Dough
Roll the top of your flour bag back (Fig. 136), then build a cone of flour in the middle of the bag and make a crater in the top of the flour mountain.
In the crater dump a heaping teaspoons or, to use Mr. Vreeland's expression, put in "one and a half heaping tea-spoonfuls of baking powder," to which add a half spoonful of salt; mix these together with the dry flour, and when this is thoroughly done begin to pour water into the crater, a little at a time, mixing the dough as you work by stirring it around inside your miniature volcano. Gradually the flour will slide from the sides into the lava of the center, as the water is poured in and care taken to avoid lumps.
Make the dough as soft as may be, not batter but very soft dough, stiff enough, however, to roll between your well-floured hands.