Author Topic: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes  (Read 16339 times)

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Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« on: February 18, 2012, 01:05:15 PM »
I found this on youtube and made these a week ago for family members, some of which are impossible to please, and they all loved it. They were great. I followed the recipe exactly with bacon and real maple syrup which I always use but had to add a splash more of water for the right consistency. Be careful if you add just a wee bit too much water it gets too thin.

"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline Gurthy

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2012, 05:19:08 PM »
You had me at "bacon" LOL!

Thanks for sharing, even I can do that recipe, even over the campfire.

Offline MATT CHAOS

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2012, 06:11:55 PM »
Sounds good!  I will have to try it!
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Offline Red

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2012, 07:24:11 PM »
mmmmmmm............ ..
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2012, 07:49:10 PM »
I may have to try these, considering I'm off anything containing gluten... I miss pancakes, bannock, and such.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2012, 02:12:34 PM »
  I can see a new trail food and cooking section in our future.

  Three staples in my pack all the time are Idaho instant potatoes,  basmatti Rice,  and Bisquick,  these staples are so varied in their cooking applications for me they are a must have.
  Instant spuds are great with a few seasonings,  but it's great as a thickener for soups, stews, and gravy.
  The sky is the limit for meals that can be created with rice by the simple addition of a few seasoning,  some veggies, and or meats such a spam, tuna, or prepared packaged chicken or beef,  add a little olive oil,  salt and pepper and it's good by itself.
  Bisquick,  Johnny Cakes,  pancakes, biscuits,  bannok, add a little sugar and fruit and you have a cobber,  mix with salt and a little water and drop them in your squirrel stew and you've got dumplings,  good eats.
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Offline Noisemaker

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2012, 02:21:40 PM »
Ohh...imalikethat

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2012, 02:58:22 PM »
Going with the idea of this chef... of how they took these ingredients with them...  In what did they haul all this with on a journey?

Theres the cornmeal, sugar, salt, and bacon.  And then he mentions honey or fruit.   

Cornmeal , salt and sugar can be in what?  Sacks?  What material was used then?

But..what about honey or fruit?   What were those kept in that didnt leak?

Is this recipe based just on pioneer days or does it go back further into history?   Before horses?  Then how were these items hauled along?

I know.. lots of questions but when one thinks back before pioneers.. plastic wasnt around, glass jars werent around, clay maybe..   And to what amounts went with on a journey? 

And what about the bacon?   What else would they have used for the grease factor? 

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2012, 03:11:15 PM »
Any animal fat, for the most part, might have been used for frying.

Pioneers would use leather or homespun sacks for dry goods (I do as well). Honey was likely kept in either a metal container or a glass bottle. If the honey was crystallized, perhaps it was also in some sort of a skin pouch? Fruit is far too fragile, unless dried, to carry. I don't know how or if they dried fruit...

A lot of fur trade or mountain men had at least two horses, one being a pack horse for all the furs, supplies, and sundries.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2012, 08:00:37 PM »
PPC.. would you make another post on your provision bags?   I'd like to see them. 

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2012, 08:26:57 PM »
PPC.. would you make another post on your provision bags?   I'd like to see them. 

WW.

Once I get a camera that works decently - I will and I will likely make a quick and dirty tutorial on making them. :)
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2012, 07:53:14 AM »

 Of course today we have many ways to carry the basics that the early settlers, mountain men,  and long hunters didn't have.
 But they did carry most of the basic provisions,  corn for making flour,  as a fast trail food,  or mixing onto stews and other meals was dried and carried in kernel form in cloth sacks,  it was ground for flour, toasted with a small amount rendered fat to make "parched corn" to be eaten like a snack,  or reconstituted in water.
 Salt, sugar, coffee and such was carried in "oiled" cloth sacks,  as was dried meats and smoked meats such a bacon and ham.
 Staples such as honey was usually collected when found naturally in the form of cones and stored in wrappers made of "waxed" paper, then stored in "oiled" sacks,  same for cured meats.
  Lard was rendered from fat from beef, bear, or deer tallow,  allowed to become solid and carried in the same "oiled" bags,  then it was used for cooking,  as a solve,  or to make soap.

  One interesting "food staple" was developed in Europe centuries ago,  people would keep a large pot simmering on the hearth and would just add water,  veggies,  and the catch of the day to the pot every day,  it would go months without being emptied and cleaned, if ever.
 As long as it was kept simmering the food didn't spoil,  well some bright individual who had let his kettle simmer for too long without being refreshed found that the only thing left in the pot was a condensed mess of "slime".
 When he dug the mess out of the pot to clean it he found that it had dried almost solid,  he tasted a small piece and though very intense wasn't all that bad, so he mixed it in with some boiling water and found that it made a not bad tasting "stock",  this innovation caught on and became a favorite of travelers who could carry a small "bar" of the stuff and use it as a base for soups and stews,  today we still use that slimy mess,  only we call it Bouillon cubes.   
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2012, 11:30:02 AM »
After reading your post this morning Moe.. I did some playing.  ha.

I made up these Johnny cakes.   They were good.   This perticular recipe really made more than one person could eat so I put the other two into a baggy.    I'm sure leftover cakes were kept to munch on later too in history.

I buy my cornmeal from an Amish store.  Its a two lb bag.   Fine Ground.    Then I hauled out the sugar wich is a five lb bag.   Instead of bacon grease I used some lard from a 1 lb package in the fridge.  Salt is in the cylinder container.    Coffee... I didnt have in bean form but it was a 3 lb container.   I had a full bear honey container in the cuboard so I added that to this list.

Just for fun I weighed all those ingredients in the bulk form.   14 lbs.      whoa.

It was an eye opener as far as weight.      What metal was normally used for cooking in?    And a mixing bowl.  Knife I'm sure is included.. but what about utensils.. 

I'm thinking everyone in history needed a mule.....

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2012, 11:34:26 AM »
Moe, you should start a post on historical food facts. :)    I could sit and listen to them forever.    My mind is always questioning on how they did things in history.   I think alot of foods we know now were discovered by accident or circumstances back then.

Its really interesting on the 'bullion' discovery.   Makes sense though. 

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2012, 11:50:31 AM »
Moe thanks for the info and WW I think the cookware of choice was cast iron with wooden and/or steel utensils for the trail. Glad you made them they are filling aren't they? If I understood it right they made a whole bunch of these before the trip so they wouldn't have to carry a lot of the ingredients separate. They used to carry the honey in the honeycomb until needed too. It's already packaged up.
"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2012, 11:58:46 AM »
HI BB.     They were really good.  Like always getting the edge piece of corn bread. :)   The good crunchy stuff.    Duh.. I didnt think of the 'make ahead' idea.   

Cornmeal was used in many ways right?   Isnt there a porridge (sp) too?  Palenta with cheese?  And of course the cornbread. 

And would it be safe to assume cornmeal was easier to come by than wheat flour?

So if one added on the weight of a cast iron pan... uffda..  two pack mules..  :)

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2012, 12:10:05 PM »
Moe, you should start a post on historical food facts. :)    I could sit and listen to them forever.    My mind is always questioning on how they did things in history.   I think alot of foods we know now were discovered by accident or circumstances back then.

Its really interesting on the 'bullion' discovery.   Makes sense though. 

WW.

  There is so much to know about how our ancestors lived their daily lives without the modern technology that we take so much for granted today that it would take a section of it's own,  and I'd be posting 24-7,  my posting tidbits now and then is about all I can handle.
  I have been into living history and period trekking since the early '70's, and I'm still learning,  but the information wasn't as easy to come by then as it is today,  now we have the internet that opens doors to learning that are amazing.
  If you have specific questions you can ask in this forum or PM me and i'll try to answer them if I can,  you can subscribe to Backwoods Magazine, it's a great resource for primitive living information,  as is Muzzle Blasts, the magazine of the Nation Muzzle loading Rifle Association,  an internet search of 'Period Trekking', 'Buckskinning,' and 'The fur trade' will net you sites with a great deal of that information. 
  Two good resources are "The Book of Buckskinning",  a series of eight books put out by Surlock Press,  and the FoxFire series of books,  both of which you can likely find at your local public library.

 Thanks for the reply.
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2012, 12:33:17 PM »
I agree, that's fascinating about the bouillon history. Makes sense though. I'd imagine even without the addition of salt, it would probably get pretty salty just from being concentrated continually as more ingredients were added over time.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2012, 12:51:04 PM »
After reading your post this morning Moe.. I did some playing.  ha.

I made up these Johnny cakes.   They were good.   This perticular recipe really made more than one person could eat so I put the other two into a baggy.    I'm sure leftover cakes were kept to munch on later too in history.

I buy my cornmeal from an Amish store.  Its a two lb bag.   Fine Ground.    Then I hauled out the sugar wich is a five lb bag.   Instead of bacon grease I used some lard from a 1 lb package in the fridge.  Salt is in the cylinder container.    Coffee... I didnt have in bean form but it was a 3 lb container.   I had a full bear honey container in the cuboard so I added that to this list.

Just for fun I weighed all those ingredients in the bulk form.   14 lbs.      whoa.

It was an eye opener as far as weight.      What metal was normally used for cooking in?    And a mixing bowl.  Knife I'm sure is included.. but what about utensils.. 

I'm thinking everyone in history needed a mule.....

WW.

 Those early settlers who moved across the country in covered wagons had the advantage of being able to carry staples in bulk,  but the Long Hunters,  Mountain Men,  and Explorer/Adventurers didn't,  especially those that went out in canoes or on foot.
 It really is amazing just how little they carried with them, they hit the woods for weeks, sometimes months with packs that weighed a scant twelve to fifteen pounds,  including their food, sleeping blanket, and tools,  now that's minimalist camping.

 Today we, without thinking about it too much are in reality trying to emulate their ways, but with more modern gear.  if we take the time to study those folks and how they did things,  it makes our choices a lot simpler.
 I've often taken weekend treks into the woods with the normal (for that period) gear,  the clothes on my back,  an extra heavy shirt, pr. of extra socks, a small corn boiler (small billy pot), utensils were your knife and a wooden or pewter spoon,  a cup or so each of parched  corn,  flour,  Jerked meat, coffee/tea, a few simple seasonings, and a water bottle,  a 7'x7' oil cloth tarp and my woolen blanket.
 I also carried my knife, hawk, flintlock longrifle, powder horn,  and my hunting bag (what some call a possibles bag),  that held my ammo, cleaning supplies, spare flints, a small ball (bullet) mold, patches and a flint and steel fire kit, a small leather belt pouch contained my smokes and my period compass/sundial.
 That's not much compared to the 40 pound packs that some of us go out with that have tents, tarps, and modern sleep systems strapped to them and food sacks that hold 20 pounds of MRE's,  but surprisingly enough one can get by very well on the little that I carried,  it's all in knowing how to do with less and still be relatively comfortable.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2012, 12:54:53 PM »
I agree, that's fascinating about the bouillon history. Makes sense though. I'd imagine even without the addition of salt, it would probably get pretty salty just from being concentrated continually as more ingredients were added over time.

 You're right,  I've made my own just to experience what it was like,  while it wasn't a salty as todays bouillon it wasn't bad,  though I still prefer the modern stuff.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2012, 10:31:03 AM »
  I love cornbread, I make it several times a month,  during the cold months there's always a cornbread on the kitchen table in a glass cake rack,  it's one of the first things that visiting family look for,  that and the coffee pot.

  I've become aware that not everyone likes traditional cornbread,  to some tastes it's too gritty,  to others is a little bitter,  and to some others is a little dry,  to us old timers,  that's cornbread.
  So I've experimented with my recipe trying to turn out a cornbread that would appeal to all my "regulars",  and I've found it.

  My standard is----

         Preheat oven to 450-F.

        1- cup of old fashioned stone ground yellow corn meal.
  1-1/2- cups of unbleached all purpose flour.
     1/2- cup of sugar.
        3- teaspoons of double acting baking powder.
        1- teaspoon of salt.
        1- large egg.
     1/4- cup of corn oil, melted butter, or bacon fat.
  1-1/2- cups of milk.

   Mix all dry ingredients together,  add milk and stir only enough to get all the ingredients wet,  do not blend or beat the batter smooth,  lumps will desolve in the baking process.

   Grease or butter a 9"x13" baking pan, pour in the batter and bake on the middle rack for 25 minutes,  check with tooth pick,  if it comes out dry it's done.

  ** I use a dedicated cast iron skillet that was one of my mothers favorites, nothing else gets cooked in that pan,  I place it in the oven when I turn the oven on and let it preheat with the oven,  when the oven comes up to temp I wait a few minutes,  then take the skillet out and give it a coat of butter and pour in the cornbread batter,  then I put it in the oven to finish baking.
  Pouring the batter into a 450 degree skillet browns the edges and gives it that sweet crunchy outer crust that everyone seems to go for.
  I also sometimes sprinkle a little sugar over the batter before it goes in the oven,  it adds a extra treat to it.

  Also to add a little "something special",  Sunday mornings is usually when the kids show up "to check in on us",  I make sure there's warm cornbread on the stove and peach preserves and apple sauce as toppers on the counter,  that's always a winner.

  Give it a try and enjoy.
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Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2012, 03:54:05 PM »
  I love cornbread, I make it several times a month,  during the cold months there's always a cornbread on the kitchen table in a glass cake rack,  it's one of the first things that visiting family look for,  that and the coffee pot.

  I've become aware that not everyone likes traditional cornbread,  to some tastes it's too gritty,  to others is a little bitter,  and to some others is a little dry,  to us old timers,  that's cornbread.
  So I've experimented with my recipe trying to turn out a cornbread that would appeal to all my "regulars",  and I've found it.

  My standard is----

         Preheat oven to 450-F.

        1- cup of old fashioned stone ground yellow corn meal.
  1-1/2- cups of unbleached all purpose flour.
     1/2- cup of sugar.
        3- teaspoons of double acting baking powder.
        1- teaspoon of salt.
        1- large egg.
     1/4- cup of corn oil, melted butter, or bacon fat.
  1-1/2- cups of milk.

   Mix all dry ingredients together,  add milk and stir only enough to get all the ingredients wet,  do not blend or beat the batter smooth,  lumps will desolve in the baking process.

   Grease or butter a 9"x13" baking pan, pour in the batter and bake on the middle rack for 25 minutes,  check with tooth pick,  if it comes out dry it's done.

  ** I use a dedicated cast iron skillet that was one of my mothers favorites, nothing else gets cooked in that pan,  I place it in the oven when I turn the oven on and let it preheat with the oven,  when the oven comes up to temp I wait a few minutes,  then take the skillet out and give it a coat of butter and pour in the cornbread batter,  then I put it in the oven to finish baking.
  Pouring the batter into a 450 degree skillet browns the edges and gives it that sweet crunchy outer crust that everyone seems to go for.
  I also sometimes sprinkle a little sugar over the batter before it goes in the oven,  it adds a extra treat to it.

  Also to add a little "something special",  Sunday mornings is usually when the kids show up "to check in on us",  I make sure there's warm cornbread on the stove and peach preserves and apple sauce as toppers on the counter,  that's always a winner.

  Give it a try and enjoy.

Thanks for this I am going to try it. I love cornbread. I had a Southwestern recipe at one time that was made with cream style corn and jalapenos diced up in it. I can't find it but if anyone else has one like it let me know.
"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2012, 06:19:26 PM »
  I love cornbread, I make it several times a month,  during the cold months there's always a cornbread on the kitchen table in a glass cake rack,  it's one of the first things that visiting family look for,  that and the coffee pot.

  I've become aware that not everyone likes traditional cornbread,  to some tastes it's too gritty,  to others is a little bitter,  and to some others is a little dry,  to us old timers,  that's cornbread.
  So I've experimented with my recipe trying to turn out a cornbread that would appeal to all my "regulars",  and I've found it.

  My standard is----

         Preheat oven to 450-F.

        1- cup of old fashioned stone ground yellow corn meal.
  1-1/2- cups of unbleached all purpose flour.
     1/2- cup of sugar.
        3- teaspoons of double acting baking powder.
        1- teaspoon of salt.
        1- large egg.
     1/4- cup of corn oil, melted butter, or bacon fat.
  1-1/2- cups of milk.

   Mix all dry ingredients together,  add milk and stir only enough to get all the ingredients wet,  do not blend or beat the batter smooth,  lumps will desolve in the baking process.

   Grease or butter a 9"x13" baking pan, pour in the batter and bake on the middle rack for 25 minutes,  check with tooth pick,  if it comes out dry it's done.

  ** I use a dedicated cast iron skillet that was one of my mothers favorites, nothing else gets cooked in that pan,  I place it in the oven when I turn the oven on and let it preheat with the oven,  when the oven comes up to temp I wait a few minutes,  then take the skillet out and give it a coat of butter and pour in the cornbread batter,  then I put it in the oven to finish baking.
  Pouring the batter into a 450 degree skillet browns the edges and gives it that sweet crunchy outer crust that everyone seems to go for.
  I also sometimes sprinkle a little sugar over the batter before it goes in the oven,  it adds a extra treat to it.

  Also to add a little "something special",  Sunday mornings is usually when the kids show up "to check in on us",  I make sure there's warm cornbread on the stove and peach preserves and apple sauce as toppers on the counter,  that's always a winner.

  Give it a try and enjoy.

Thanks for this I am going to try it. I love cornbread. I had a Southwestern recipe at one time that was made with cream style corn and jalapenos diced up in it. I can't find it but if anyone else has one like it let me know.

  Thanks,  just know that this recipe is not as dense and a lot sweeter than traditional cornbread,  the consistency is more cake like than rustic.
  It may not appeal to those that like true southern style cornbread that is made mostly or all stone ground corn meal and little or no flour,  and very little sugar.
  But it's certainly been a big hit with my family and circle of friends up here in the north east.
  During the cold months I make one every Sunday morning,  and most of the time it's gone and I'm making another by mid week.
  I especially like it when it's a couple of days old,  I cut a large slice in half, lay on some butter and fry it up in a skillet or on a griddle,  three eggs over easy,  a few slices of bacon,  and half a pot of strong coffee,  and I'm good to go until supper.

  I have made cornbread with kernel corn,  bacon bits,  and cayenne pepper before,  most guy's really like it,  the wives not so much.
  It's about the same recipe except you use one cup of all purpose flour, 1-1/2 cups of stone ground cornmeal,  and only 1/4 cup of sugar,  when in season I also fine dice half a red and half a green pepper from the garden and throw that in the pot also.
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2012, 06:24:07 PM »
That sweeter cornbread recipe sounds like something my wife would love!

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2012, 06:54:16 PM »
  Not cornbread,  but if you want to make points with the family or friends around the breakfast table try this,  it's not my own,  but if it's good enough for Paula Deen it's good enough for me.

  Set the oven temp as per instructions on the package.

  You start out with a tube of Butter Milk Biscuits from the frozen food Isle.
  Cut them in quarters and set aside.
  Melt a stick of butter or margarine and set it aside.
  Put about a cup of brown sugar in a dish and set aside.
  Spray a 9"x13" baking pan with pam or grease with butter.

  Now take a piece of pastry and dip it in the butter,  then roll it in the brown sugar, and put it in the baking pan.
  Repeat the process until the pan is full and all the pastry pieces have been used up (they may need to be crammed in a bit).
  Pour what ever sugar or butter that's left over the top and place in the oven,  bake as directed on the pastry package.

  While it's baking,  take about half a cup or so of powdered sugar,  add a table spoon (more or less) of orange juice,  and enough water (one table spoon full at a time) to make a thick drizzle,  and set aside.

  When the pastry is done (it'll be baked but sticky) let cool for about five minutes or so,  then drizzle the topping on and serve,  make sure to put out plenty of napkins or a roll of paper towels,  some paper plates and forks.
  This my friends is a winner,  when I make this for more than four people there's never any left overs,  and usually there's a battle over the last piece.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2012, 07:09:08 PM »
That sweeter cornbread recipe sounds like something my wife would love!

 My wife was the one that inspired me to experiment with the recipe,  when ever I made cornbread she'd pass on it because it was too gritty and too bitter for her taste,  now when she smells it baking she gets out the apple sauce and sets the breakfast table,  she now loves cornbread,  mine anyway.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2012, 07:17:49 PM »
  For those folks with sugar problems,  my cornbread recipe works well when Splenda is substituted for sugar,  though the Splenda may be a little sweeter tasting than real sugar,  so you might want to cut back on the volume just a little for the first one and see how it tastes.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2012, 07:38:00 PM »
Might have to give it a shot with Splenda to see. I've used splenda in a cheesecake recipe and it comes out great.

I remember my grandmother on my dad's side used to put warm cornbread in a bowl and then pour cold half and half in with it. Talk about tasty!

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2012, 07:58:20 PM »
Might have to give it a shot with Splenda to see. I've used splenda in a cheesecake recipe and it comes out great.

I remember my grandmother on my dad's side used to put warm cornbread in a bowl and then pour cold half and half in with it. Talk about tasty!

 My dad used to do the same thing,  my folks were used to using cream in their coffee from the days when we had raw milk and the cream would come to the top of the bottle,  sometimes they used condensed milk,  I still bring a couple of small cans in my pack when I camp over.
 Anyway,  yes my dad would heat up the cornbread in the oven or in a cast iron pan,  then he'd break it up,  sprinkle a little sugar on it and pour some cream over the top.

 I have type 2,  for about a year after it was found I was on a strict diet, no sugar,  no candy,  easy on the fruit,  soda was out.
 So I baked just about everything with Splenda,  since then I lost 60 pounds,  took my meds faithfully, and did some walking,  I still take my meds,  but the diet has been relaxed quite a bit,  everything is in moderation.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Yeoman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2012, 12:41:22 PM »
Can't wait to try these next weekend with my son.
Thanks so much for sharing this.
"Learning: a continuation of the failure process"

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #30 on: February 27, 2012, 07:33:46 AM »
Can't wait to try these next weekend with my son.
Thanks so much for sharing this.

  Not a problem,  I grew up in a French Canadian home, in a neighborhood that was made up mostly of a mix of French Canadian and Italian families,  surrounded by people that did most of their socializing around food,  growing up in the '40's, '50's and early '60's there wasn't much in the way of packaged fast food,  most everything was home made from scratch,  much of the food came from small garden plots and the hen house,  and some from fishing and hunting small game.
 I learned to cook at a very early age from my parents and grand parents,  and they instilled in me the value and the love of good food,  and that it didn't need to be expensive or exotic to be good.
 Since I love to cook, especially in the tradition of my family teachings,  I enjoy sharing those foods and recipes with others.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #31 on: February 27, 2012, 08:17:52 AM »
  Not cornbread,  but if you want to make points with the family or friends around the breakfast table try this,  it's not my own,  but if it's good enough for Paula Deen it's good enough for me.

  Set the oven temp as per instructions on the package.

  You start out with a tube of Butter Milk Biscuits from the frozen food Isle.
  Cut them in quarters and set aside.
  Melt a stick of butter or margarine and set it aside.
  Put about a cup of brown sugar in a dish and set aside.
  Spray a 9"x13" baking pan with pam or grease with butter.

  Now take a piece of pastry and dip it in the butter,  then roll it in the brown sugar, and put it in the baking pan.
  Repeat the process until the pan is full and all the pastry pieces have been used up (they may need to be crammed in a bit).
  Pour what ever sugar or butter that's left over the top and place in the oven,  bake as directed on the pastry package.

  While it's baking,  take about half a cup or so of powdered sugar,  add a table spoon (more or less) of orange juice,  and enough water (one table spoon full at a time) to make a thick drizzle,  and set aside.

  When the pastry is done (it'll be baked but sticky) let cool for about five minutes or so,  then drizzle the topping on and serve,  make sure to put out plenty of napkins or a roll of paper towels,  some paper plates and forks.
  This my friends is a winner,  when I make this for more than four people there's never any left overs,  and usually there's a battle over the last piece.

Moe thanks for this one too! This is my next one to make.

Can't wait to try these next weekend with my son.
Thanks so much for sharing this.

  Not a problem,  I grew up in a French Canadian home, in a neighborhood that was made up mostly of a mix of French Canadian and Italian families,  surrounded by people that did most of their socializing around food,  growing up in the '40's, '50's and early '60's there wasn't much in the way of packaged fast food,  most everything was home made from scratch,  much of the food came from small garden plots and the hen house,  and some from fishing and hunting small game.
 I learned to cook at a very early age from my parents and grand parents,  and they instilled in me the value and the love of good food,  and that it didn't need to be expensive or exotic to be good.
 Since I love to cook, especially in the tradition of my family teachings,  I enjoy sharing those foods and recipes with others.

Don't you wish these days were back? Some people say it was "Harder Living" back then. To me it was "Simpler Living" but with more hard work. I would prefer hard work for myself with a quality end product being good food and a good life over the lifestyle we have become accustomed to today with crappy food. I  grew up with a lot of good farm food and cooking too.
"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #32 on: February 27, 2012, 01:38:01 PM »
  That's a good question BB,  I don't have an answer,  along with all the good memories of those "good old days",  there are many thoughts of what wasn't so good,  the social racial climate,  the illnesses that have long since been cured,  and the damage that we did to our environment,  sadly one can't wish for one and not take the other.
  Would I like to see the return of neighbors actually knowing neighbors,  and banding together to help each other,  would I like to have the option to shop at mom and pop stores again,  see the return of farm stands, roadside seafood stands,  and know that I'm able to buy anything I wanted and know that it was made in America,  would I like to see real American history and national pride taught in schools again,  hear kids speak to their elders with respect,  hear them say Hello Mr. Jones,  Good day Mrs. Roberts,  yes sir,  no sir.
  Would I like to have dinner in a real restaurant owned by a local family that serves real food prepared on site from local producers ?

  By God the answer to all of those questions is a resounding Yes,  if only we could, but without the the ability to be politically incorrect,  or to even speak of politics, morality, or God honestly and have anyone listen today we don't have much of a chance of getting those institutions back.
  About all we can do is to try to live our individual lives as closely as possible to the values we hold dear,  and keep moving forward.

  I know that it's not in the realm of popular thought,  but I don't see any kind of real change in that direction until we the people have been forced to become self reliant again,  to give and receive neighborly help again, and to learn to thrive on less than we have been brainwashed into thinking we actually need,  and I think that we'll only get there when we as a society in this country hit rock bottom.

  And it looks like we may be a lot closer than we think.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Yeoman

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #33 on: March 04, 2012, 04:51:31 PM »
Barbarossa Bushman,
thank you so much for posting that video and sharing with us such a great recipe.
I made this today for Sunday brunch after Church for my son and my lady-friend.
They loved them (and so did I). I did them just as the chef in the video demonstrated.
I normally do pancakes or french toast for my son with bacon, sausages, homemade hashbrowns etc.
These were a great change and turned out just as advertised.
They will be so easy to make on the trail!
Thanks again!
Yeo
"Learning: a continuation of the failure process"

Offline Professor

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Re: Another great easy recipe Johnny Cakes
« Reply #34 on: March 04, 2012, 07:00:10 PM »
I had to try the Johnny Cake recipe and it turned out quite well!  Thanks for posting it.  My batter was a little too thin, so I ended up adding a little more flour to get it about right.  The end product looked about like the video, and they tasted good, so it was a success.  I had tried this before, and was not very successful.  This recipe is a keeper!
...and I'll see you soon!