Author Topic: Hike to an Air Disaster  (Read 3760 times)

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Offline woodsorrel

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Hike to an Air Disaster
« on: December 20, 2014, 09:56:48 AM »
Hi Everyone!

We often hike to waterfalls, mountain tops, and beautiful views.  But some of the most rewarding hikes involve the rediscovery of local history.  The mountains where I reside are dotted with long abandoned shingle mills, logging camps, and farmsteads from the 1800?s and early 1900?s.  Each tells a story.  There is something timeless and awe inspiring about visiting a ruin and imagining what it is like to live in that time.

For the second time, I hiked to the crash site of the Resolution.  British Commonwealth Pacific Airlines Flight 304 departed Honolulu bound for San Francisco in October 28, 1953.  And as the DC-6 climbed into the night it immediately encountered problems.  The rest, as they say, is history...




The picture above is a shot of the ill-fated airliner.  Here are two pictures from my hike:






As I researched the crash, I became more and more fascinated by the story.  Here is a link to what we think happened as well as more pictures and more information about my hike:

An Air Disaster and Historical Hike


Has anyone done any "historical hiking" lately?

- Woodsorrel

The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
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Offline madmax

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2014, 10:11:42 AM »
Grand Canyon has some stories.  Put on your big boy boots.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
Hunter S, Thompson

Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2014, 10:39:40 AM »
Grand Canyon has some stories.  Put on your big boy boots.

Have you done any of those hikes?  Do you have any favorites?

  - Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline upthecreek

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2014, 11:12:24 AM »
Good stuff woodsorrel. We have some interesting old homesteads dotting the Blueridge. Always interesting to run across the old cabins. Important to remember the wells that are inevitably close by. Avoiding the moonshine stills is an important consideration around these parts too.

Creek

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Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2014, 11:26:06 AM »
Good stuff woodsorrel. We have some interesting old homesteads dotting the Blueridge. Always interesting to run across the old cabins. Important to remember the wells that are inevitably close by. Avoiding the moonshine stills is an important consideration around these parts too.

Creek

upthecreek, do you ever find turn-of-the-century farm equipment or tools near the cabins? 

Are there any techniques for avoiding old wells?  Personally, I would much rather deal with rattlesnakes, tarantulas, and scorpions!  :)

- Woodsorrel

The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline wolfy

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2014, 11:31:06 AM »
There's a lot of old WWII era crash sites in Nebraska.  Jerry Penry has even surveyed, mapped, identified and written a book about them.....

http://www.nebraskaaircrash.com/background.html
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Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2014, 11:33:55 AM »
There's a lot of old WWII era crash sites in Nebraska.  Jerry Penry has even surveyed, mapped, identified and written a book about them.....

http://www.nebraskaaircrash.com/background.html

Hmmm.... I wonder if there is a resource like that for California?

Thanks, wolfy!

- Woodsorrel

The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline madmax

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2014, 11:44:25 AM »
Grand Canyon has some stories.  Put on your big boy boots.

Have you done any of those hikes?  Do you have any favorites?

  - Woodsorrel

Yes.  Respect.  Root around.  People went to the other side there.  It's a pilmigrage. 
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
Hunter S, Thompson

Offline xj35s

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2014, 02:11:44 PM »
Our Lake was once the most polluted in the world. Because of a cleanup by honeywell it was sonar mapped. They found a number of boat wrecks and the Jet that went in.

An F-94 jet from what was then the 138th Fighter Squadron at Hancock Field, crashed in about 60 feet of water on Nov. 26, 1955. The pilot, Lt. John Kesel, 23, of Fayetteville, was killed.
An investigation found that Kesel, a student at Le Moyne College, became disoriented in a snow squall as he headed back to Hancock after a training mission. Divers recovered his body the next day, but Air National Guard officials decided not to raise the 8-ton jet

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/08/onondaga_lake_story.html
pessimist complain about the wind. optimist expect the wind to change. realist adjusts the sails.

Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2014, 02:25:45 PM »
Our Lake was once the most polluted in the world. Because of a cleanup by honeywell it was sonar mapped. They found a number of boat wrecks and the Jet that went in...

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/08/onondaga_lake_story.html


That's an interesting story and article, xj35s.  I never would have thought Onondaga Lake would have so many interesting things hidden beneath its surface.  Thanks for posting it.

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline upthecreek

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2014, 03:17:59 PM »
Good stuff woodsorrel. We have some interesting old homesteads dotting the Blueridge. Always interesting to run across the old cabins. Important to remember the wells that are inevitably close by. Avoiding the moonshine stills is an important consideration around these parts too.

Creek

upthecreek, do you ever find turn-of-the-century farm equipment or tools near the cabins? 

Are there any techniques for avoiding old wells?  Personally, I would much rather deal with rattlesnakes, tarantulas, and scorpions!  :)

- Woodsorrel

Most anything metal has been taken and scraped by the meth heads or shot up by roving idiots. Structures still exist but vandals always make their presence known. It's a sad thing.  :pissed: As far as avoiding the nasty holes, you just have to be very careful, it's surprising that often you can still see the paths to them from the house.

Creek

Creek
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2014, 04:56:08 PM »
When I lived in Colorado I spent a lot of time fishing and hunting in the high mountains.  I was at two wreck sites.  One on the west side of Mount Evans just south of the mountain where a Beechcraft Bonanza augured into the mountain one night.  We heard the plane hit the cliff during the night so I know where that one is.  Most of the plane was hauled out within the month.  This was back in 1968. 

The other is on Jones pass off to the north of the road and up a draw.  All that is left is the fuselage.  I don't remember when it crashed but it was back in the sixties I think. 

Colorado, due to the mountains, has a lot of plane crash sites.  Here is a map that shows them............ 

http://googlemapsmania.blogspot.com/2012/06/plane-crash-sites-on-google-maps.html
 
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Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2014, 08:57:57 AM »


... Colorado, due to the mountains, has a lot of plane crash sites.  Here is a map that shows them............ 

http://googlemapsmania.blogspot.com/2012/06/plane-crash-sites-on-google-maps.html

Wow, wsdstan, you aren't kidding!  I was surprised by the number of pins in that map.  Are there many "ghost towns" in Colorado as well?

  - Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Hike to an Air Disaster
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2014, 09:27:56 AM »
There are.  When I was a young fellow we used to go out and find a lot of them.  Many still had buildings and some even had newspapers and dishes and so forth still on the tables.  The dumps still had old bottles and tins from the late 1800's and early 1900's.  Most of this is gone now, too many people with access to them.  A lot of the hippies moved into them in the 70's and used up a lot of the material making fires and salvaging things to sell.

There are guide books to the ghost towns.  The best abandoned town I was ever at was a place called Lamartine.  West of Idaho Springs but difficult to find back then.  It was, as I remember, the first Colorado town laid out on a grid.  It was pretty intact.

Guide to the Colorado Ghost Towns is still in print.
http://www.amazon.com/Guide-Colorado-Ghost-Towns-Mining/dp/0804001405

And of course there are sites on the web......

http://www.rockymountainprofiles.com/Colorado%20Ghost%20towns.htm

A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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