Author Topic: Texas Fireframe  (Read 1174 times)

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Offline Quenchcrack

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Texas Fireframe
« on: November 05, 2015, 09:01:43 AM »
Anyone have any experience with one of these?

http://texasfireframe.com/

It claims to use unsplit logs which really appeals to an old geezer with a bad back.
I guess he'd rather be in Colorado.
-John Denver

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Texas Fireframe
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2015, 09:44:45 AM »
  I don't have any experience with these , but there is a topic discussing how this type of thing should "not" work...
http://bladesandbushlore.com/index.php?topic=11972.0
 :shrug:


  [Personally, I think reflectors DO work, though. Both behind a fire facing you & when you have one behind you like a shelter or a big rock. Something to do with convective, infrared & all the other science stuff that goes into heat transfers. Anyway, I just don't feel like arguing the point. There nor here. Folks can make up their own minds, right?]
 ;)


  Anyway, I think this is a pretty good idea that this feller is promoting & makes sense by exposing more of the fire/flames to the area outside of the firebox, rather than confining by stacked logs horizontally. Don't know that I would buy one. I think I would just figure out a DIY way or stack the logs different in a fireplace.
 :)


Thanks for sharing!
 :)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: Texas Fireframe
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2015, 10:05:55 AM »
I'm thinking the "pocket" formed by the logs concentrates the heat and keeps the wood burning.  The burning wood then radiates the heat into the room.  Radiation is the most efficient form of heat transfer and should sustain the fire and heat the room efficiently.  But I am not a PhD physicist like the guy who invented it.  It looks pretty simple and a person with some scrap metal and a welder could probably fab one up for their own use pretty easily.
I guess he'd rather be in Colorado.
-John Denver

Offline imnukensc

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Re: Texas Fireframe
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2015, 12:33:59 PM »
I think it would work pretty well even though fireplaces are notoriously inefficient.  As the lady noted in just the first few seconds of the video, by opening up that middle section of the fire you get that radiant heat that normally would be buried under/behind the wood in a normal fireplace.  My biggest concern would be using rounds versus splits as my experience with using rounds is that they are tougher to get going and keep going compared to split wood.  'Course that may not be the case with opening up the middle of the fire like this grate does. 
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Texas Fireframe
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2015, 06:34:48 PM »
I can see the pocket it creates but wonder about how much better it is.  The chimney draws pretty hard and I wonder if you would have to put it as clase as possible to the front of the box to get more heat in the room. 

There used to be a grate on the market that was made of sort of u shaped pipes about 2" in diameter that supposedly drew air in one end of the pipe and expelled hot air out the other.  I never owned one but the principal is similar and the pipes stuck out into the hearth area further than the burning area. 
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