Author Topic: mukluks and frozen feet.  (Read 3217 times)

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Offline JV3

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mukluks and frozen feet.
« on: February 01, 2016, 02:15:59 PM »
last weekend there was too much snow on the road already at 3 am so i missed out on overnighting during a blizzard with bearthedog but there was still a good bit of snow left over in the woods this past weekend.






c-bone is back! last time we overnighted was over two years ago when he was barely recovered from several surgeries from a devastating mountain bike accident...shattere d his collar bone, hence his nickname :D




we've been waiting for a long time to finally see him doing things like this...looks like he's fully recovered and we're all thankful.






c-bone chilling in his hammock with his mukluks.



« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 02:55:01 PM by JV3 »

Offline JV3

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 02:17:03 PM »
he's a fast learner ? checkout those wood shavings...notice the mukluks are now soaking wet due to the snow melt.




pyramid fire layout ? usually what i go with...light it and forget about it.






anchor log.




c-bone threading it through the natural hole in the log like a needle...good thing i didn't bet money on it that he couldn't do it.
 



back to the mukluks...no dinner pics because we over-worked ourselves during the day collecting a ton of firewood that we didn't notice our feet were now soaking wet from the melted snow. that heat from the sun was very deceptive, soon after sunset the temp dropped so fast unlike i've ever seen before...the fire was just so smoky and was burning our socks and boots more than drying them out so we both went in our shelters by 9 pm.
 



the stove was glowing red hot...i think i finally figured out how to eek the most heat from it.




i'm not kidding when i say water was dripping from my wool socks (the two pairs i had)...even after all these years winter camping i still made a newbie mistake and let them get wet...shame on me!


Offline JV3

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 02:17:42 PM »
i thought i had it bad...until c-bone woke me up at sunrise the next day informing me he didn't sleep and froze all night in the hammock even with his 0? bag and wool blanket. he took the wool liners out of his mukluks the night before to dry them out but it ended up freezing so he couldn't put them back in the next day...he was literally ready to put his feet inside the now un-insulated mukluks and make a run for the parking lot, leaving all his gear behind :D




my stove to the rescue! it's all radiant heat without the risk of burning unlike an open fire so he managed to thaw everything out and put the wool liners and his feet back in. looking back it's funny now but man, when it was happening it was downright miserable...frozen feet is no joke.




we did manage to get two benches started...going to improve on it on upcoming trips.




the hike back...glad we thawed out our shoes...can't imagine hiking back with frozen feet.




breakfast at a local diner ? it took all of my will power not to peel off some of that birch bark :D this particular species is common farther up north but here it's like spotting a unicorn!




that's why i prefer winter over any season to camp...i always come away a little more beat up and hopefully wiser :)

Offline wsdstan

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 02:37:02 PM »
Looks like a fun trip even with the frozen feet.  Nice stove too.
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Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 03:24:48 PM »
Very cool shelter set ups.

Getting wet's no joke. Sometimes it's hard to avoid. In fact, I tend to get wet in one form another on most trips. Mukluks were a brave choice.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2016, 05:43:30 PM »
  I enjoyed seeing the pics & reading the narrative!
:thumbsup:


Thanks for sharing & looking forward to more of your adventures!


:)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Yeoman

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2016, 07:07:32 PM »
Wow, what a great trip and fantastic learning experience.
I've had frozen boots a few times and can commiserate with your friend.
I've rarely worn mukluks; and then only the Canadian Army ones as part of scale of issue. I'm sure they're great in cold dry conditions. Here in Nova Scotia, the temps just don't go low enough. Runner boots with felt liners are my choice. The liners get damp from perspiration but an hour or two by the fire takes care of most of the moisture. Either on your feet or on sticks without the boot.
Oh, BTW, what's your stove?
Thanks for sharing.


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Offline upthecreek

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2016, 10:34:47 AM »
Great report. Still hope you had a pretty good time. Once the feet get cold the fun stops for me too.

Creek
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Offline Pennsylvania Mike

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2016, 11:57:07 AM »
Great pictures Jay, and real good camping equipment.   Notice you like to set up camp on top of a hill, at least it looks that way to me in the pictures, like the one c-bone dragging the wood logs up the hill with a rope, hey at least you are not going to get flooded.   I love that little wood burner you have, I never used any heat source while winter camping and that was around 1980s with the Scouts and when I had a Post for the older boys (and girls, had one in the group), but I used the supper shelter which was unknown at the time in my part of the woods in Pennsylvania; I remember using it at 10 degrees and it felt warm inside enough to take the winter coat off, specially after cooking with an Optimus 8R Hunter stove.
I really enjoy looking at the pictures of your adventures and the gear you use.
Prepared for the worse, hope for the best.

Offline Pennsylvania Mike

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2016, 12:10:18 PM »
Jay, I always wore Sorel Stag winter snow waterproof boots with the black Vibram souls and a plastic liner and never had cold feet, I worked outdoors for 25 years and Probably wore those boots for 23 years during the winter and could not wear out the soul or heels of the boots, they are tough.
Prepared for the worse, hope for the best.

Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2016, 03:36:21 PM »
Not sure I would have worn mukluks as my first choice, but hey, you don't know how it will perform until you test it out thoroughly. Cold feet is one of my pet hates, especially cold and wet feet. In the winter I carry an extra two pairs of "working" (day set) socks to avoid that, plus, I change into a dry set of night/camp clothes...this method virtually eliminates the moisture buildup problem and hasn't let me down. And thank goodness you had the stove, walking with two ice blocks for feet is not fun.....

Ah yes, jerky, the staple of all snacks! :D
I like the Oberto brand because they don't put all the unnecessary artificial preservatives and monosodium glutamate (MSG) in their jerky.
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Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2016, 03:43:15 PM »
Jay, I always wore Sorel Stag winter snow waterproof boots with the black Vibram souls and a plastic liner and never had cold feet, I worked outdoors for 25 years and Probably wore those boots for 23 years during the winter and could not wear out the soul or heels of the boots, they are tough.
Another Sorel user :). Aye, their soles are quite tough. Mine (vintage Sorel Champions from the '60s) were hand-me-downs from my brother's godfather, who worked in ski patrol in the Castkills, Adirondacks, and Green Mtns as an EMT. He wore them many a winter, and I still have and wear them. He took good care of those boots, and I have found no other boot design to be as good as shoepac construction for a winter boot in the Northeastern region. Mine have the 70% wool 30% synthetic (rayon?...) felt inner bootie. With these boots, two layers of socks (first layer medium weight and the next heavyweight) and my homemade gaiters, I've never had cold feet.
"Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe." ~ Abraham Lincoln
My blog, https://newenglandbushcraft.wordpress.com/

Offline JV3

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Re: mukluks and frozen feet.
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2016, 10:35:30 PM »
Looks like a fun trip even with the frozen feet.  Nice stove too.

thanks! having a good friend there suffering alongside always makes things bearable for sure.


Very cool shelter set ups.

Getting wet's no joke. Sometimes it's hard to avoid. In fact, I tend to get wet in one form another on most trips. Mukluks were a brave choice.

thanks! in my case it's an easy fix - i just need to remember to bring my gaiters next time.


  I enjoyed seeing the pics & reading the narrative!
:thumbsup:


Thanks for sharing & looking forward to more of your adventures!


:)

thanks! hopefully there'll be another trip soon :)


Wow, what a great trip and fantastic learning experience.
I've had frozen boots a few times and can commiserate with your friend.
I've rarely worn mukluks; and then only the Canadian Army ones as part of scale of issue. I'm sure they're great in cold dry conditions. Here in Nova Scotia, the temps just don't go low enough. Runner boots with felt liners are my choice. The liners get damp from perspiration but an hour or two by the fire takes care of most of the moisture. Either on your feet or on sticks without the boot.
Oh, BTW, what's your stove?
Thanks for sharing.


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thanks! it's a kifaru titanium small oval...they also sell stainless steel box stoves.




Great report. Still hope you had a pretty good time. Once the feet get cold the fun stops for me too.

Creek

thanks, creek! we definitely still had a good time - having friends suffering alongside is the key i think, haha.


Great pictures Jay, and real good camping equipment.   Notice you like to set up camp on top of a hill, at least it looks that way to me in the pictures, like the one c-bone dragging the wood logs up the hill with a rope, hey at least you are not going to get flooded.   I love that little wood burner you have, I never used any heat source while winter camping and that was around 1980s with the Scouts and when I had a Post for the older boys (and girls, had one in the group), but I used the supper shelter which was unknown at the time in my part of the woods in Pennsylvania; I remember using it at 10 degrees and it felt warm inside enough to take the winter coat off, specially after cooking with an Optimus 8R Hunter stove.
I really enjoy looking at the pictures of your adventures and the gear you use.

thanks, mike! we were indeed on top of a small hill - the only flat level surface in the area and surprisingly very little rocks to get in the way of my tent stakes...you know how it is in harriman. that's part of the reason why i'd really like a winter-ready hammock setup eventually - so many places with stunning views but it's impossible for a ground setup.

i have a love/hate relationship with that stove...the extra setup time and especially the wood processing is very time consuming. however, the entertainment value alone is high especially during a rain so it always comes down to the last minute for me to decide whether to bring it. i'm not a morning person either so it's nice to be able to fire it up and heat up some water while i'm still laying down, hehe.


Jay, I always wore Sorel Stag winter snow waterproof boots with the black Vibram souls and a plastic liner and never had cold feet, I worked outdoors for 25 years and Probably wore those boots for 23 years during the winter and could not wear out the soul or heels of the boots, they are tough.

thanks! i'll look into it. my merrells (the boots i wore on this trip) and gaiters have kept my feet dry in worse conditions in the past...i just don't know why i didn't bring it on this trip. d'oh! i think i briefly "forgot" how to gear up properly for the winter since it's been a crazy warm winter so far.


Not sure I would have worn mukluks as my first choice, but hey, you don't know how it will perform until you test it out thoroughly. Cold feet is one of my pet hates, especially cold and wet feet. In the winter I carry an extra two pairs of "working" (day set) socks to avoid that, plus, I change into a dry set of night/camp clothes...this method virtually eliminates the moisture buildup problem and hasn't let me down. And thank goodness you had the stove, walking with two ice blocks for feet is not fun.....

Ah yes, jerky, the staple of all snacks! :D
I like the Oberto brand because they don't put all the unnecessary artificial preservatives and monosodium glutamate (MSG) in their jerky.

looking back i think this frozen feet deal was a blessing. c-bone regularly camps in the winter but only in their family cabin up north so this was the first time in a hike-in first type for him i think. it definitely drove home the importance of having the skill to build a fire to him so i don't have to...heck, i'm just happy he didn't try to get in my shelter in the middle of the night, haha.

come to think of it, that's probably why he didn't just restart the camp fire (several nights worth of firewood already stashed there ready to go) and slept next to it. i did tell him earlier in the day i regularly sleep next to the fire on solo trips (but mostly for ambience rather than warmth) and he was welcome to use up as much of the firewood if he needed to do the same if he got too cold.

i didn't know that about oberto...which reminds me i really need to make my own.


Jay, I always wore Sorel Stag winter snow waterproof boots with the black Vibram souls and a plastic liner and never had cold feet, I worked outdoors for 25 years and Probably wore those boots for 23 years during the winter and could not wear out the soul or heels of the boots, they are tough.
Another Sorel user :). Aye, their soles are quite tough. Mine (vintage Sorel Champions from the '60s) were hand-me-downs from my brother's godfather, who worked in ski patrol in the Castkills, Adirondacks, and Green Mtns as an EMT. He wore them many a winter, and I still have and wear them. He took good care of those boots, and I have found no other boot design to be as good as shoepac construction for a winter boot in the Northeastern region. Mine have the 70% wool 30% synthetic (rayon?...) felt inner bootie. With these boots, two layers of socks (first layer medium weight and the next heavyweight) and my homemade gaiters, I've never had cold feet.

i really need to checkout the catskills and adirondacks!