Author Topic: More on Char Cloth  (Read 3861 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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More on Char Cloth
« on: February 11, 2012, 10:03:57 AM »

  I've found that better than old tee shirts or denim cotton 100% cotton rope makes a fine Char medium,  it seems to collect less moisture and it catches sparks much faster than chared cloth strips.
  I have an old hammock strung with 100% cotton rope that I have been using for a couple of years to make my Char "cloth" with and it's the best for catching sparks.
 
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Offline MATT CHAOS

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2012, 10:27:35 AM »
No kidding, I will, definitly, try some cotton rope.  Thanks!
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Offline Nelson

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2012, 11:05:36 AM »
Hmm, have to give that a try myself. I have just used old 100% cotton undershirts. Always have worked but I am always up to trying something new.
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Offline C3 Knives

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2012, 11:07:00 AM »
I heard if ya use hemp ya better stay away from the smoke..  :-\    They call it Whaky Tabacky char cloth.   JK
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Offline Dano

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2012, 02:58:32 PM »
It does work great, just be careful with the rope.  Even "100%" cotton clothes line has a nylon core that has to be removed first, but yes it does work great.

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2012, 03:02:33 PM »
I've soaked denim charcloth in water for a few minutes, then blotted it with a towel and let it air dry and it still worked. I think it's ok for the stuff to get wet so long as it's dry when you try to use it.

Offline Remo007

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2012, 11:10:57 PM »
Hey Moe M.!
                  Thank you for the Idea! 8)
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Offline Noisemaker

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2012, 03:47:43 AM »
Cotton rope is a good idea.  I have heard of cotton wick, but rope would be less expensive.  Thanks.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2012, 09:50:39 AM »

  It's not my idea,  I stole it from "Fire in Five",  for those who have never heard of them,  they sell flint & steel fire kits,  the kits are geared towards novice fire makers,  they come with a length of jute rope that you have to break down into fibers for your birds nest,  a good black flint chard,  a U shaped steel striker,  and a tin filled with char material for catching the sparks,  the material they use for char is broken down 100% cotton rope.
  Since they are marketing these kits mainly to beginners,  and they promise that if you follow their instructions You will make a fire in five seconds,  and you will,  the key is providing the very best and easiest materials possible,  that's why they include the chared rope instead of cloth layers.
  The last kit I bought from them was several years ago and it was selling for about $25.00,  while there is nothing fancy about the kit,  it does give a newbie the ability to strike a light successfully right from the get go.

  I would suggest that one using the rope for char break it down (unwind) into cotton strands before charing.

  Another good tip,  tinder for birds nests have a tendency to collect moisture over time which makes it hard to flame from an ember,  the tinder is usually fiber such as jute,  local grasses,  or rubbed bark,  these materials can be refreshed (dried out) quickly the night before you hit the brush by simply putting it in the Microwave for about 10 seconds on high,  then storing it in a dry container.

 NOTE....  Just make sure there is NO char material mixed in with the tinder or it will go up in flames,  this is from personal experience and resulted in a really dirty look from my dear wife.
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Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2012, 10:37:26 AM »
I have a tinder gizmo of cotton rope soaked in a potassium nitrate (saltpetre) solution, then dried of course, as a tinder punk in a brass tube that I made a few years ago for fun. Now I have to find it and use it.
"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline Moe M.

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2012, 05:52:36 PM »
I have a tinder gizmo of cotton rope soaked in a potassium nitrate (saltpetre) solution, then dried of course, as a tinder punk in a brass tube that I made a few years ago for fun. Now I have to find it and use it.

 I had one also,  I got talked out of it by a friend at rondezvoux a few years ago,  I made mine from a brass nipple that came with a light fixture,  it was threaded but I sewed a leather sleeve on it and put a leather thong on it to wear it around my neck,  if you burn the end of the cotton rope you are actually charing it,  it will take a spark from your flint and steel or ferro rod easily,  I used mine mostly to light my pipe but often used it instead of char cloth to light camp fires,  One strike and it would start to glow,  and to put it out all you do is pull the trailing end of the rope so that the burning end is flush with the tube and it smothers it.
 It's a good tool and a great conversation piece,  good on you bro.
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Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: More on Char Cloth
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2012, 08:18:12 PM »
Hey Moe ya that's like mine. I tied the small fire steel that I took of a magnesium bar on the side with inner tubes/ranger bands to use as a striker. I quit carrying it because it was heavy for the size but being a heavy brass tube it is tough. I liked the threaded caps on the ends for keeping it dry if I used a short piece of rope the length of the tube. I used it to light a cigar once and it worked fine. Now I have to find it.
"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend