Author Topic: Sea to Summit X Pot  (Read 3844 times)

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Offline Sarge

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Sea to Summit X Pot
« on: September 18, 2016, 11:06:30 AM »
I changed up my cook set and food a bit on the recent Big South Fork trip. I bought a couple new stoves and made a couple different alcohol stoves.


I took this carbon felt wick stove on the trip along with a new Sea to Summit XPot / Kettle.


http://www.seatosummit.com/product/?item=X-Pot+%2F+Kettle&o1=0&o2=0&o3=130-41

The pot is light and compact. I actually did a little cooking rather than just heating water to rehydrate a meal. I cooked a rice & broccoli side dish and added some canned chicken. For breakfast, I cooked some steel cut oats. Both meals did well with the pot / stove combo. Food easily rinsed off the base and the silicone sides, no sticking or scorching. Also brewed some coffee in it. So far, the X Pot is Sarge approved ... just don't tell my wife it was $45.

The primary disadvantage is the silicone cannot be used on a campfire. I'm reluctant to try it with the wood gas stove, too. So the X Pot limits me to a stove only. 
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2016, 02:16:54 PM »
I am not familiar with this pot.  Not made of metal except for the bottom?  Must be very light weight. 
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Offline U.W.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2016, 02:17:58 PM »
Interesting pot, I've not heard of it before.  I'm  curious to see/hear how it holds up over years & thousands of miles of use - as I am with any product.

It's good to see you're continuing to try stuff out, and work toward what works best and is awesome for you! 
There is certainly a lot of internet & u-toob activity about that particular style of stove. 

For me, I have found the advantage(s) of that stove are it's very low temp usability, and much less of a spill hazard (due to the felt holding the fuel). Two pretty big pluses in my book.  I've made and used bunch of'em.
 
It definitely has it's "cons" of course, but this isn't about that.  That stove you are using is an outstanding stove.

Now - some of what I've learned across making a whole lot of those stoves.  If you want to cut some weight and get rid of that seamed tomato paste can - an Axe body spray can is the same diameter iirc, or dang well close enough.  You can whack the top and bottom off an empty one, clean it out, cut it to size, notch and hole it, wrap it with the same piece of felt and put it in the cat food can...
Works real good and you rid yourself of the heavier and seamed can.  I have read (though never seen it myself) that the seam in the tomato paste can will eventually fail.

If you want to save even more weight and still not have a seam - a small red bull can is also the same diameter - or more than close enough - though a bit less robust (hence Much lighter).  Same deal with the prepping of course.  Do use a side cutter can opener to take the top off the can and use the top portion of your now side-cut topless can as your stove - with the top being the top - the remaining ring provides useful support for it across the top.  I've used one across a whole lot of boils (hundreds??) and not had any issues as of yet... 

It is generally agreed that a flame height of one inch is optimum for alchy stoves...  Do your own learning and investigating on that.  For my own use, I have definitely found that not to always be true.  Some other factors that come into play are: pot size, and fuel consumption.  A higher flame burns fuel quicker and needs a bigger diameter pot. Conversely  .... 
So if you have a smaller diameter pot and don't necessarily want to burn through as much fuel (alcohol) you can get some red bull cans and "play around" until you find and tweak it to what works absolutely best for you, your pot, and style.  Using that X-pot/kettle at ~6 inch diameter though, that one inch flame height is likely gonna be really, really good on that pot - if not maybe even a skosh higher, though you'll burn through fuel faster.

u.w.

Offline U.W.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2016, 02:22:59 PM »
I am not familiar with this pot.  Not made of metal except for the bottom?  Must be very light weight.


the blue hyperlink right under the photo of it takes you straight to the web page with info/specs for the x-pot/kettle


u.w.

Offline Sarge

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2016, 04:13:51 PM »
Yep wsdstan, it's just over 6 ounces with the lid. Base is anodized aluminum.

I appreciate your thoughts and the tips on tweaking the stove, u.w. That was my wick stove build and first field use and I liked it. It's been a while since I've used anything but the alcohol jet stove and I see some advantages with the wick stove.
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Offline U.W.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2016, 05:39:40 PM »
No worries Sarge,


One of the advantages of the alchy stove is: It's relatively inexpensive for us DIY-ers to test, tweak, invent, and "play".   Wick stoves definitely have some advantages.


Do "play around" with your inner can height and chosen cook pot. 
I have one pot that it's base is fully covered by the flame, with only a 1/2" flame (inner can) height.  That height works perfect for THAT pot, and the fuel consumption is pretty miserly.  Another that works perfectly with a 3/8" height, it's even more miserly with the fuel (alcohol).  If I went higher with the inner can, the flame(s) would be running up the sides of the pot, and it'd burn through fuel much faster - for hardly any gain.  I have another that works best with a 3/4" flame - it's the one I make coffee with every day.  The flame height being determined by the diameter of the pot I use it with.
And while we're getting into specifics a little... they ALL act totally different when a windscreen is around them, as opposed to no windscreen.  The flame is what acts different.  Different size and behavior.  So when you're doing your testing, don't forget about windscreen(s).  They have a major effect on how the stove & flame act.  There's some good tutorials on u-toob for how to make a caldera cone type windscreen if you were interested.  If not, some heavy duty aluminium foil - among other things - works just fine.


Some folks love their alcohol "jet" stoves, and for them they are perfect, and the best. 
As with many things, and as has been said - It's all about finding what You like the best, and what works the best for You and how You do Your thing.  When you find that one - that one is the best one.  And, it's fun in the interim "playing", and learning as you go.  If you like that pot and stove combo (s2s Xpot/kettle & fancy feast wick stove) and it works awesome for you, when, how, and where you do your thing - then it is indeed perfect.


u.w.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2016, 07:31:39 PM »
Interesting stuff, u.w.  :thumbsup:     I had no idea there would be that much difference in an alcohol stove's heating efficiency just by varying pot sizes, distances to pot bottom, etc.   Thanks for cluing me in! :P
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Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2016, 08:15:06 PM »
Does anybody know if there is a health concern with the silicone?  Is there any concern that it will leach endocrine disruptors?

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Offline Sarge

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2016, 07:52:17 AM »
Yikes! Specs say food grade, BPA fee, blah blah blah...but I don't know.
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Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2016, 09:05:55 AM »
Although many companies have removed BPA from their products, there is some concern that the chemicals that replace BPA may have issues of their own.  I do not know if there is good science one way or the other.  So I just thought I'd ask.

I don't want to scare anyone away from what may be a fine product.  I just want to know if there's a risk I might become empathetic and good at multi-tasking.  :)


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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2016, 10:18:52 AM »

  I'm guessing that the X-Pot would be a great addition to a minimalist backpacker who used a dedicated backpacking stove such as the MSR Pocket Rocket or WhisperLite stoves that have a very small flame footprint,  from my experience with stoves such as "cat" stoves, Trangia's and other DIY alcohol stoves which is pretty extensive because if I use a stove it's usually an alcohol stove,  I have others like the Pocket Rocket and wood gasifier stoves, I don't like dealing with canisters,  and if I'm going to use wood I'll build a small cook fire anyway, my experience is that controlling the flame on an alcohol stove to keep it from climbing the sides of all but large dia. pot is pretty iffy.
 For those folks who require an all around cook pot silicone may not be quite as useful with anyting other than a small footprint flame stove.
 If size and weight are to be the deciding factors in choosing a backpacking stove,  for the traditional backpacker/camper who generally carries a solo type stove there are better options,  for myself I've always relied on Stainless for my cookware for the obvious reasons, strength,  no limits on food types, no transfer of flavors,  good cook times,  no transfer of toxins such as may be found in cheap aluminum cookware,  and ease of cleaning.
 But, Stainless is heavy,  and the option of smaller stainless cookware for the soloist is an issue,  over the last year or so I've found that I had to lighten my load and minimize my pack,  I chose a Mor's 1.1 Lt. bush pot w/bail,  It's light, compact, but still gives me the option to boil or cook five cups of water or food,  it's anodized and stick proof and easy to clean,  it's served me very well,  but since then I've downsized from a backpack to a smaller shoulder pack,  that required a bit smaller pot,  my choice was a Toaks .750 ML. Titanium Bush pot also with a bail.
 The Ti pot weighs a mere ounces and is just a bit smaller Dia. than my Mor's pot,  but it fits my pack perfectly and I still have the full range of cooking options such as boiling water, making a stew, or baking in it,  it works very well with all of my different backpacking stoves,  and I can hang it over the fire or place it on the coals without fear of melting or deforming the pot. 
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Offline Sarge

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2016, 11:06:12 AM »
I just want to know if there's a risk I might become empathetic and good at multi-tasking.  :)

LOL!

Good stuff, Moe. I've used stainless the most - for the reasons you mentioned. It's bombproof. I started looking at other options to lighten my load a bit. I see the big advantage of the pots you mentioned and being able to cook on any stove or fire vs. a stove only with that X Pot. I like the idea of the bail but I've never tried anything with one. If this X Pot doesn't work out, I'll be in the market for titanium and it looks like that Toaks Bush Pot would be about right. Dang it! Now ya got me interested in one of those.

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Offline mahaney

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2016, 05:15:25 PM »
I like it. I think I will wait for some more reviews, but it looks like for someone trying to get their pack weight down and generally just use it to heat water with light cooking duties, this would be just about perfect.

J

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2016, 07:57:47 PM »
I just want to know if there's a risk I might become empathetic and good at multi-tasking.  :)

LOL!

Good stuff, Moe. I've used stainless the most - for the reasons you mentioned. It's bombproof. I started looking at other options to lighten my load a bit. I see the big advantage of the pots you mentioned and being able to cook on any stove or fire vs. a stove only with that X Pot. I like the idea of the bail but I've never tried anything with one. If this X Pot doesn't work out, I'll be in the market for titanium and it looks like that Toaks Bush Pot would be about right. Dang it! Now ya got me interested in one of those.

  Cookware for me was cast iron when car camping and stainless when traveling light,  when Titanium first came out I swore I'd never own any,  more because of the three Ti is about the least forgiving cookware,  but also because of the prices it sold for,  now that the prices have come down a bit and because of my need to lighten the load and make it fit into a smaller pack I've had a change of heart,  when I ran across the Toak's line last winter at a outfitters store it kind of more or less made up my mind,  but it took until the following spring to swallow my pride and eat my words.
 LOL,  well now that you have an interest,  let's do a little side x side comparison and see where they're at advantage wise,  my Toaks bush pot with the bail and lid weighs 4.7 ounces, two ounces less than the sea to summit silicone pot,  my Toaks .750 ML. Ti pot sells for $35.00 dollars,  the Sea to Summit cost you $45.00, a full ten dollars less,  the Toaks is not limited to any heat source used to cook on, the Sea To Summit is limited to a small flame stove,  with care the Toaks will last a life time,  the Sea to Summit will eventually crack and separate where the Silicone meets the aluminum bottom,  I have Silicone baking pans and muffin pans,  the two older ones are starting to crack, I'm assuming from repeated trips to the oven at high temps which stiffens the silicone over time.
  The medium Sea to Summit pot is 6" in dia. and holds 24 ounces of water or food,  the Toaks is 4-3/4" in dia. and holds 24.8 ounces,  Please understand,  I'm not knocking the Sea to Summit Silicone pot,  I'm just comparing the two in a practical sense,  and so far I can't see any advantage in favor of the Sea to Summit over the Toaks bush pot,  but then again,  I'm not an ultralight pile the miles on backpacker,  I'm just a simple outdoorsman who enjoys getting far enough off the pavement so I can't hear the traffic,  make a quick camp, build a small fire, then sit back with a cup of cowboy coffee,  roll a smoke and contemplate the great mysteries of the universe   ;).
     
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Offline U.W.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #14 on: September 19, 2016, 11:51:49 PM »

 But, Stainless is heavy,  and the option of smaller stainless cookware for the soloist is an issue,  over the last year or so I've found that I had to lighten my load and minimize my pack,  I chose a Mor's 1.1 Lt. bush pot w/bail,  It's light, compact, but still gives me the option to boil or cook five cups of water or food,  it's anodized and stick proof and easy to clean,  it's served me very well,  but since then I've downsized from a backpack to a smaller shoulder pack,  that required a bit smaller pot, my choice was a Toaks .750 ML. Titanium Bush pot also with a bail.
 The Ti pot weighs a mere ounces and is just a bit smaller Dia. than my Mor's pot,  but it fits my pack perfectly and I still have the full range of cooking options such as boiling water, making a stew, or baking in it,  it works very well with all of my different backpacking stoves,  and I can hang it over the fire or place it on the coals without fear of melting or deforming the pot.


WOW!
So that's what???  Three quarters of a milliliter (ml), or roughly fifteen drops?  That's an Amazingly small pot...  Dare I say, unbelievably? 
Your boil times must to be equally amazing!  Not to mention the scant amount of fuel it would likely require to achieve that boil...


u.w.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2016, 07:07:00 AM »

 But, Stainless is heavy,  and the option of smaller stainless cookware for the soloist is an issue,  over the last year or so I've found that I had to lighten my load and minimize my pack,  I chose a Mor's 1.1 Lt. bush pot w/bail,  It's light, compact, but still gives me the option to boil or cook five cups of water or food,  it's anodized and stick proof and easy to clean,  it's served me very well,  but since then I've downsized from a backpack to a smaller shoulder pack,  that required a bit smaller pot, my choice was a Toaks .750 ML. Titanium Bush pot also with a bail.
 The Ti pot weighs a mere ounces and is just a bit smaller Dia. than my Mor's pot,  but it fits my pack perfectly and I still have the full range of cooking options such as boiling water, making a stew, or baking in it,  it works very well with all of my different backpacking stoves,  and I can hang it over the fire or place it on the coals without fear of melting or deforming the pot.


WOW!
So that's what???  Three quarters of a milliliter (ml), or roughly fifteen drops?  That's an Amazingly small pot...  Dare I say, unbelievably? 
Your boil times must to be equally amazing!  Not to mention the scant amount of fuel it would likely require to achieve that boil...


u.w.

  Thanks for pointing that out,  it should have been 750ML and not .750 ML.    :thumbsup:
   
  Well sir,  I've never been much good at converting metric measurements,  but from what I'm led to believe,  if a vessel of any kind (bottle, pot, bowl) is under a liter capacity wise it's measured in milliliters,  as in a bottle of good booze, most popular are half gallons, and there's quarts and so on,  I buy size depending on use,  I loves my Absolute so I buy it by the Half gallon,  my wife doesn't drink as much as I do,  she likes seven and sevens,  so I buy her Seagram's in the quart size,  once in a while I enjoy an extra dry Martini, straight up with three olives,  a few drops of dry vermouth in two ounces of gin or Vodka is about perfect,  so when I buy my Vermouth it's usually in the 750 ML. size bottle,  which equates roughly to about 24 ounces or three US cups.
  Now I have to admit that you did have me questioning myself so I took the liberty to go right to Toaks web site for a clarification,  sure enough,  that (my) little Bush Pot is 750 ML. in size and it actually holds a bit over at 25.4 ounces US by their measurements,  quite a bit over 15 drops I'd say,  but then again that would depend on the size of your drops.

                                                                                        :shrug:

  As for fuel, as I mentioned in my other post I have quite a few camping stoves that range from a Coleman fuel Three burner camp stove down to tiny fancy feast cat food can alcohol stoves,  also have some military individual soldier stoves that burn gasoline,  and a few bio fuel backpacking stoves,  but by far my favorite is alcohol fueled stoves,  my two most used lately are a millsurp Trangia that I use with my 1.1 liter (the .1 being a milliliter I think  ;) ) Mor's Bush pot, and my newest pop can stove which is turning out to be the best I've ever made which I use with my 750 ML Toaks bush pot,  it'll boil two cups of water in 7 minutes which is nothing special,  but the burn time on one ounce of fuel is 18 minutes,  one and one half ounce of denatured alcohol will give me about a full thirty minutes of burn time,  and that's impressive for a little stove made from three V-8 cans and a few odd hardware pieces.

 Please tell us about yours ?     :cheers:
« Last Edit: September 20, 2016, 07:16:00 AM by Moe M. »
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Offline Sarge

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2016, 09:30:22 PM »
I just want to know if there's a risk I might become empathetic and good at multi-tasking.  :)

LOL!

Good stuff, Moe. I've used stainless the most - for the reasons you mentioned. It's bombproof. I started looking at other options to lighten my load a bit. I see the big advantage of the pots you mentioned and being able to cook on any stove or fire vs. a stove only with that X Pot. I like the idea of the bail but I've never tried anything with one. If this X Pot doesn't work out, I'll be in the market for titanium and it looks like that Toaks Bush Pot would be about right. Dang it! Now ya got me interested in one of those.

  Cookware for me was cast iron when car camping and stainless when traveling light,  when Titanium first came out I swore I'd never own any,  more because of the three Ti is about the least forgiving cookware,  but also because of the prices it sold for,  now that the prices have come down a bit and because of my need to lighten the load and make it fit into a smaller pack I've had a change of heart,  when I ran across the Toak's line last winter at a outfitters store it kind of more or less made up my mind,  but it took until the following spring to swallow my pride and eat my words.
 LOL,  well now that you have an interest,  let's do a little side x side comparison and see where they're at advantage wise,  my Toaks bush pot with the bail and lid weighs 4.7 ounces, two ounces less than the sea to summit silicone pot,  my Toaks .750 ML. Ti pot sells for $35.00 dollars,  the Sea to Summit cost you $45.00, a full ten dollars less,  the Toaks is not limited to any heat source used to cook on, the Sea To Summit is limited to a small flame stove,  with care the Toaks will last a life time,  the Sea to Summit will eventually crack and separate where the Silicone meets the aluminum bottom,  I have Silicone baking pans and muffin pans,  the two older ones are starting to crack, I'm assuming from repeated trips to the oven at high temps which stiffens the silicone over time.
  The medium Sea to Summit pot is 6" in dia. and holds 24 ounces of water or food,  the Toaks is 4-3/4" in dia. and holds 24.8 ounces,  Please understand,  I'm not knocking the Sea to Summit Silicone pot,  I'm just comparing the two in a practical sense,  and so far I can't see any advantage in favor of the Sea to Summit over the Toaks bush pot,  but then again,  I'm not an ultralight pile the miles on backpacker,  I'm just a simple outdoorsman who enjoys getting far enough off the pavement so I can't hear the traffic,  make a quick camp, build a small fire, then sit back with a cup of cowboy coffee,  roll a smoke and contemplate the great mysteries of the universe   ;).
     
No worries about knocking my X pot. I'm not married to it yet. I agree with the pros and cons you covered. I'm sure I'll end up trying Ti.

Your V-8 can stove has some serious burn time! Is it the capillary inner wall style or something else?
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2016, 08:57:58 AM »
I just want to know if there's a risk I might become empathetic and good at multi-tasking.  :)


     
No worries about knocking my X pot. I'm not married to it yet. I agree with the pros and cons you covered. I'm sure I'll end up trying Ti.

Your V-8 can stove has some serious burn time! Is it the capillary inner wall style or something else?

  No,  it has no inner wall,  it's actually quite a unique design,  I had never seen one before until I happened to be surfing bushcraft alcohol packpack stoves and clicked on "images" off bushcraft stoves, there was one image out of the bunch that was called a drain catcher stove,  it caught my attention so I googled "drain catcher stove and got two hits with just enough information to put one together.
 It's made of three pop can type stoves,  a small sink drain insert, and three Peg board plier holders for the pot stand,  it took a little figuring to get worked out how the drain insert is sandwiched between two of the can bottoms,  but then it was fast and easy to build.
 Basically it's a single walled pop can stove with an inverted drain catcher sticking up in the center of it,  the part the holds the drain catcher in place acts as a small priming pan,  the peg board holders stick into the top holes in the drain insert and becomes the pot holder which will take just about any pot or pan short of a dutch oven,  the stove has no other holes than those in the drain insert,  they bloom very quickly and they also comform very well to what ever size pot you are using,  I can't say why but it's self adjusting,  as for burn times and fuel efficiency all I can think of is that the flame is centered and consentrated by the shape of the drain insert.
 if you get a chance to find one on line it's worth investigating.
 
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Offline madmax

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Re: Sea to Summit X Pot
« Reply #18 on: September 28, 2016, 09:41:20 AM »
delete
« Last Edit: September 28, 2016, 09:46:39 AM by madmax »
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