Bushlore Topics > Bushlore and Outdoor Skills

TRUCKER'S HITCH (REVISITED)

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wolfy:
Just a few weeks ago, I learned of a very effective technique for keeping all of the tension possible in a TRUCKER'S HITCH or a CINCH KNOT without  losing any of the ground you've gained while you're tying it off with the final slippery half-hitch or whatever finishing knot you prefer.  Most of us just pinch the point where the running portion of the line runs through the 'pulley' and tie the slippery half-hitch one-handed, but if you're like me (God forbid) you lose just a hair of tension while performing that last bit of sleight-of-hand. >:(

The very simple trick is to pass the running part of the line through the midline loop TWICE (in the same direction) instead of just once, before doing your final tensioning pull.  That move will bind the knot without losing any of the tension, while you finish up with the slippery half-hitch for added security. 

To untie the knot, just yank the slippery half-hitch free and then pass the bitter end of the line back through the midline loop in the opposite direction you passed it through in the first place, give it a yank.....and it pops loose like magic. :shocked:

Old Philosopher:

--- Quote from: wolfy on October 12, 2017, 10:52:08 AM ---Just a few weeks ago, I learned of a very effective technique for keeping all of the tension possible in a TRUCKER'S HITCH or a CINCH KNOT without  losing any of the ground you've gained while you're tying it off with the final slippery half-hitch or whatever finishing knot you prefer.  Most of us just pinch the point where the running portion of the line runs through the 'pulley' and tie the slippery half-hitch one-handed, but if you're like me (God forbid) you lose just a hair of tension while performing that last bit of sleight-of-hand. >:(

The very simple trick is to pass the running part of the line through the midline loop TWICE (in the same direction) instead of just once, before doing your final tensioning pull.  That move will bind the knot without losing any of the tension, while you finish up with the slippery half-hitch for added security. 

To untie the knot, just yank the slippery half-hitch free and then pass the bitter end of the line back through the midline loop in the opposite direction you passed it through in the first place, give it a yank.....and it pops loose like magic. :shocked:

--- End quote ---

:doh:  The weaker my pinching fingers get, the more I'm going to remember this.  Thanks, Wolfy!

:cheers:

madmax:
Well I felt guilty after wolfy's call out to his post here... yes I did read it.  But I had a few before hand and it he could've written it in Greek and I would've gotten as much out of it as I did.  This morning I cannot for the life of me figure how that was so hard.  hmmmm.

wolfy:
 :rofl: :cheers:  That explains a lot right there, Tony.....but maybe I was too 'wordy' in my description when I was trying to explain how simple it really is, too.  Another way of explaining it in simpler terms might help convey the mechanics of what I was trying to pass on. :P

How 'bout this?   Instead of just passing the bitter end through the tensioning loop ONCE, and then pulling the knot tight.....do one COMPLETE FULL TURN through the tensioning loop and THEN pull the knot tight.  That simple move locks in all the tension you've applied to the line without losing even a millimeter of tension. :shocked:     While that move DOES lock the tension, I wouldn't trust it entirely without a final slippery half-hitch for added security and peace of mind. 

I'll see if I can find a video, too.....if one exists. :coffee:

madmax:
I got it now.  I will use this one a lot with boats.

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