Author Topic: Flashlights -- Then and Now  (Read 4894 times)

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Online madmax

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #50 on: May 09, 2019, 03:16:06 PM »
Yes, I've considered that.  There's a 1911 next to my bed and a hand held light.  This may not go over well but I'm thinking that our way of life is decaying.  So I'm prepared to defend at my house, in my camp, and at my cabin.  I'm not going for the AR at my home unless it is absolutely necessary.  The cabin has a lot of dark around it.  I'm trying to cover all the bases I can.
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #51 on: May 09, 2019, 04:33:36 PM »
I have the same issue with it but in a house it makes more sense to have it mounted on the AR than trying to shoot with one hand and work the light with the other hand.  I agree that if you use a pistol the light is better off in your non-shooting hand.

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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #52 on: May 09, 2019, 06:47:20 PM »
What do y'all use for a firearm mounted light.  AR-15 with a Red Dot on the rail.  Home defense.

 I don't,  I never could warm up to giving an aggressor a bright target to shoot at or to give away my position especially when I'm standing right behind the light, my LE training had me using a hand held light well away from my body or my head.
 Which is only one of the good reasons why I don't agree with those that suggest a rifle or shotgun for defense inside the home or other building,  a couple of other problems associated with using a long gun in the home has to do with retention, hinders the use one hand to open doors or move something out of the way without loosing some control of your weapon, and moving from one room to another or turning corners without having the gun at the ready, giving an aggressor an opportunity to grab your weapon.
 If a long gun works for someone they should use what they are comfortable with, but they should be aware of the drawbacks of their choice.

 Just something to think about.
Plus ++!   "Shoot at the light! You'll probably get a head shot!"  No thank you.
First thing I was taught to do clearing a building with large rooms was to hold my flashlight at arms length straight out the side of my body. If someone shot at the light, chances were slim they'd hit my hand or arm.
The only exception I make to Moe's "long gun" advice is a "short, long-gun".  The legal limit for semi-auto shotguns last I checked was 16" barrel and 22" over-all.  That's a pretty maneuverable 12 ga in close quarters, especially with a pistol grip stock.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Online madmax

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #53 on: May 10, 2019, 04:38:52 AM »
My AR is 32" with the stock collapsed.  Our cabin has no interior walls, but I doubt they'd even get close to getting in.  We have no neighbors in any direction that a bullet might make it to.  So I'm confident that a shot with the AR would not go wrong.

Our house is very small and very crowded  (My wife loves stuff.  And that's all I have to say about that. lol).  That indicates a handgun and a handheld light (as you guys pointed out). 

The truck and car have a coupla placements for a holster including a crossdraw on me when I'm driving.  I'm not shooting into the dark in that situation.  It'd be almost nose to nose.

Camping it depends on if I'm in or out of a campground.  Most (if not all) developed campgrounds we've been to have the No Firearms sign.  That means CC my Micro 9 or my little .380.  If we're in a "dispersed camping" area, I usually have a long gun, a 1911 in the tent, and a 9'er on my hip.

As far short shot guns goes,  I was jones'n for one of those newer short 12g's with that kind of bird's head grip... then I shot one.  I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with it.  I think it would take a lot of practice to be effective.  A lot of clays got away that day. lol.  So I'm looking for a 18" 12g with a stock on it.  Then mount a light on it.

Thanks for all the input.  I think I am on the right track here.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #54 on: May 10, 2019, 08:33:08 AM »
Max, there are still a few Mossberg 500's around to be had:

Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline wolfy

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #55 on: May 10, 2019, 08:39:08 AM »
Most people can't hit anything with those short, pistol-gripped shotguns.....the recoil is hard to control and they're awkward to shoot with any accuracy.  One of my brothers-in-law lives in Anchorage and bought a light weight, pistol-gripped, synthetic-stocked 870 for bear protection when he took his 3 young daughters salmon fishing in the local rivers.  He had to use it ONE time to ward off a bear that had entered their campsite.  He aimed to frighten, not kill the the bruin......which, he said was fortunate because with all the excitement and the extra heavy bear loads (that he had not practiced with) it was brutal to fire & control with no shoulder support and he had almost no control of where the shots were hitting.  They look cool, but.....
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Online madmax

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #56 on: May 10, 2019, 09:15:56 AM »
Exactly wolfy.  I shoot regularly but they seem to be an unnecessarily hard weapon to get good at.

I would like a Mossberg Marine or a Remington Mariner but they're not really in my budget.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #57 on: May 10, 2019, 12:15:22 PM »
Most people can't hit anything with those short, pistol-gripped shotguns.....the recoil is hard to control and they're awkward to shoot with any accuracy.  One of my brothers-in-law lives in Anchorage and bought a light weight, pistol-gripped, synthetic-stocked 870 for bear protection when he took his 3 young daughters salmon fishing in the local rivers.  He had to use it ONE time to ward off a bear that had entered their campsite.  He aimed to frighten, not kill the the bruin......which, he said was fortunate because with all the excitement and the extra heavy bear loads (that he had not practiced with) it was brutal to fire & control with no shoulder support and he had almost no control of where the shots were hitting.  They look cool, but.....
Operative word there is "practice".  No skill can be achieved looking at a piece on the rack.  I'd never choose a stubby shotgun for "bear medicine", especially in AK! 
The thing about these shorties with a pistol grip is they are meant to spray 00 buckshot at ranges under 15 feet (like your living room).  A shooter doesn't aim them, they point 'em, much like a huge pistol.

Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Phaedrus

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #58 on: May 10, 2019, 11:14:12 PM »
Exactly wolfy.  I shoot regularly but they seem to be an unnecessarily hard weapon to get good at.

I would like a Mossberg Marine or a Remington Mariner but they're not really in my budget.

I got my Mossberg 500 Mariner (the nickel one) for $250 used.  Pretty good deal but if you keep an eye out they do pop used at decent prices.  A 12 ga is my idea of bear spray.

Before I get piled on I do actually carry pepper spray as well which I'll try before going to guns.

Online madmax

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #59 on: May 11, 2019, 03:28:46 AM »
That's more in my price range Phaedras.  Thanks.  That's encouraging.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline Phaedrus

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #60 on: May 13, 2019, 10:44:23 PM »
I'm not an expert on shotguns but I've heard the Mossberg Maverick 88 is a pretty solid gun and a bit under the $200 mark new IIRC. It's basically a stripped down, cheaper version of a Mossberg 500.

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #61 on: June 08, 2019, 11:17:40 PM »
    Retired the MagLights when I found the Holy Grail.  A headlight.  Never popped for a good one.  I just needed a little light so as not to fumble around as much.  Well I bought a Petzl for caving and climbing but it was heavy.  Now I want a good one with the capabilities like you're talking about but I'm so confused by the choices I have procrastinated for a long time.

     I have to admit having Harbor Freight freebees stashed many places.

I had a Petzl from way back around 1993 when they still used incandescent bulbs. Todays Walmart LED headlamps are way, way better than even the high end stuff from back then. I have a few cheapies lying around that I use. My favorites are the ones that take a single AA instead of 3 AAA cells.

Offline lgm

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #62 on: June 24, 2019, 05:14:53 PM »
Yes lights now are so much better then what we had back in the day. I keep a little aaa led in my pocket. For 90% of what I need it is more then enough & I have brighter lights for the other 10%
What a great day to be outside.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #63 on: June 24, 2019, 08:48:30 PM »
I have some of those AAA led lights that are pretty good for, like you say, 90% of what we do.  I have a powerful headlamp that is quite useful at night for checking cows, riding a ATV, or just walking through rough country.  I also have one of those very bright Surefire flashlights that the police use when checking stuff out in the dark.  Rechargeable and very bright for a small light.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2019, 07:20:03 PM by wsdstan »
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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #64 on: June 24, 2019, 09:27:43 PM »
I just bought a UV flashlight on ebay-----for finding hornworms on my tomato plants.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #65 on: June 24, 2019, 09:43:45 PM »
I just bought a UV flashlight on ebay-----for finding hornworms on my tomato plants.
I picked up one from Amazon last summer for finding airborne contaminants in the garden. Never thought about caterpillars. With a relatively cheap spray bottle of indicator, you have your own blood forensics kit.  ;D
Excellent for finding out behind which couch the cat used as a litter box.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #66 on: June 25, 2019, 09:23:59 PM »

Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Pete Bog

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #67 on: June 25, 2019, 10:34:10 PM »
OP, I'd agree with the video conclusions for the most part. But one thing to be aware of is cold weather performance. If it absolutely has to work in temperatures below -10*F, I highly recommend spending the extra money for a lithium battery. Driveway alarms, emergency exit lighting, surveillance or game cams, weapons sights come to mind. My equipment has worked down to -35*F with the lithium cells. Learned the hard way about regular alkaline in cold temps. For those of you living in regions of civilized temperatures, please disregard. :)

Offline Pete Bog

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #68 on: June 25, 2019, 10:43:42 PM »
If you have a UV flashlight (I got mine at Walmart for $9.95) It's great for detecting some gemstones. Throw a beam on the wife's Ruby necklace or earrings and the color is astounding.
Take it to the Goodwill or second hand store and see what you can find. It won't last long though, once they see what you are doing. But . . . . .not everything that glows is valuable, so don't get carried away.
Even a walk down a gravel road, railroad track or a dark beach can be fun. You might have to tape the light to a walking stick to get it close to the ground for a better view.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Flashlights -- Then and Now
« Reply #69 on: June 25, 2019, 11:07:49 PM »
Good info, Pete.  My Kirkland AA's from Costco have worked in my trail cams down to -10F, but not much more.  :-\
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!