Author Topic: Cooking Wild Boar  (Read 838 times)

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Offline NoseWarmer

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Cooking Wild Boar
« on: October 13, 2018, 07:39:46 PM »
So Wild Boar will be a new one for me to try.

I have searched around and it has been said that the meat is darker and leaner than domestic pork and has a sweet nutty taste.

So my question is, how to cook it and how it tastes.

Please help...
Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated...

Offline madmax

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2018, 05:01:46 AM »
My first wild pig was great.  The second was inedible. And so it went. 
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
Hunter S, Thompson

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2018, 08:15:23 AM »

  I've always cooked mine (razorbacks) low and slow just like domestic pig,  they always turned out great,  look up recipes for Italian Porketta or Cuban BBQ pig for seasoning and cooking ideas.
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Offline JeffG

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2018, 09:00:58 AM »
Think crock pot, onions and a slow cook. With a roast, brown first, in a frying pan. Season with salt pepper onion powder and place on a bed of onions. Add 1/2 cup chicken broth, turn it on low, and check it when you get home from work. It should be fork tender.
For pork sandwiches, use a can of Pepsi instead of broth, cook until you can shred it with a fork. Shred it all down, drain liquid, and fill back in with your favorite BBQ sauce; stir and let simmer. Serve on hamburger buns. 
"Rise, Peter; kill and eat." Acts 10:13

Offline NoseWarmer

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2018, 06:40:00 PM »
Thanks for the input guys, now I just have to wait for the meat to arrive...

I have been thinking slow in the smoker, maybe some Applewood...
Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated...

Offline Unknown

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2018, 07:19:18 PM »
I think you are right NW. Not that I have cooked any wild boar... not sure what that means except Russian. Maybe this stuff is feral. Regardless on the grill/ smoker how could you go wrong? What cuts are you going to cook first? That imo would determine what you do with the grill.
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Offline Unknown

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2018, 06:10:23 PM »
I talked with a guy today that told me he marinates his ferel pork in 7up before hot smoking.  :shrug:
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Offline NoseWarmer

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2018, 07:59:15 PM »
I talked with a guy today that told me he marinates his ferel pork in 7up before hot smoking.  :shrug:

Thanks for the info... Still waiting on the meat :)
Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated...

Offline Unknown

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2018, 08:32:51 PM »
Just another thought Nosewarmer. Did you read the discussion about hogs? I asked earlier what you meant by wild boar. There's a number of restaurants that have Russian boar on the menu. These are almost universally raised in a domestic situation. As we discussed previously, our old nemesis trichnosis is eliminated from domestic pork... or so they say. In wild, feral animals such is not the case. So use your thermometer accordingly.
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Offline Alan R McDaniel Jr

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2018, 06:52:45 PM »
I have killed, butchered, cooked and eaten lots of feral hogs. 

I have found that there are several things that contribute to how wild(feral) pork tastes much prior to actual cooking. 

1. The condition of the animal. A nursing sow will not taste good, nor will there be any tenderness to the meat. A lean or poor condition boar may have a disagreeably strong taste. 
Animals that are in poor condition are either sick or food is scarce and they are eating things they would not normally eat, thus making the meat taste like that.  You are what you eat.  Pigs are too.
In my experience, hogs that have been on acorn mast and have a layer of fat from acorn mast taste the best.

2. The shot.  One good clean instantaneous kill shot does wonders for the taste of the meat.  Head (behind the ear) shots or point of the shoulder shots work the best for me.

3.  Cleaning.  I do not gut my hogs in the field.  I get them in the truck and back to camp where the water hose is as soon as I can (Like stop everything and go tend to the hog ASAP).
I hang the hog by it's hind legs and wash the hog completely scrubbing with a brush.  This removes dirt, pests and the urine mud they roll in.
Only when the outside is clean do I go inside. Nearly every hog I've killed had a full bladder.  It is extremely important NOT to puncture it.   On boars it is also important to keep all the boar hardware
out of the way and intact.  You don't want leaks.  After gutting all the way to the chin, I then wash the inside with water.  Since it is often warm out down here I do't allow it to cool.  I start
skinning right away being careful to keep hair off the meat.  I do save the heart, liver and pancreas for catfish bait.

4. Butchering.  Cleanliness is the key.  I use a large ice chest and put quartered and trimmed portions in it.  When I get it all in I cover with ice and add water and more ice until it is full of
lots of ice and filled in with water.  I stays there for a day.  This chills the meat and pulls the blood out.  As I butcher I slice off most of the fat for rendering and I give that to some ladies I know
who like to use hog lard to make good things to eat.  Acorn mast fat is pure white and the lard is beautiful.

The actual cutting up of the meat is done to personal preference.  If you've cleaned it properly, cooking it will almost always be successful.

I have found that mast fed boars do not have a strong boar taste generally.  I have killed 400# boars that tasted great.  I've killed 200# sows that were inedible.

Usually it's good, to, upon beginning the gutting process, to slice off a piece and throw it in a frying pan.  Normally, you'll know even before you taste it from the smell.


Alan

Offline Alan R McDaniel Jr

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Re: Cooking Wild Boar
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2018, 07:00:43 PM »
Personally, I do not like the smoked pork or pulled pork type dishes.  I do like grilled pork steaks and breakfast sausage.  In the past I liked more diverse dishes
but lately I like a lot less grease.  I do like smoked loins or backstrap but the shoulders and hams have too much fat for my tastes these days.  Smoking them is certainly
very good, I just can't take it any more.

Alan