Author Topic: Eight Question Tag  (Read 287 times)

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Offline woodsrunner

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Eight Question Tag
« on: November 21, 2018, 08:26:13 AM »
awhile back i was asked to participate in an eight question tag.
It would be interesting to see how folks here at Blades n Bushlore would answer these same questions
not asking for answers to all...but it would be fun to hear some of them at least!...thanks for looking...woods
#1 your most memorable camp?
#2 do you prefer solo or group camping?
#3 what is your favorite knife?
#4 where did you learn your bushcraft skills from?
#5 what is your favorite fire starting method?
#6 what type stove do you prefer, alcohol, wood or gas?
#7 do you keep a bugout bag in your vehicle?
#8 what is your most essential piece of gear?

« Last Edit: November 21, 2018, 04:16:31 PM by woodsrunner »
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Eight Question Tag
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2018, 01:34:32 PM »
I am going bowhunting in about an hour so I have some time.  Can't answer all of them as I couldn't quite make out the last couple of questions.  Anyway here are my answers to a few of them:

Most memorable camp?  I will have to tell you about my 2nd most memorable camp as my wife would have a conniption if I told you about my favorite.  A friend of mine and I were floating the Smith River in Montana back about 1980 or so.  There had been a flood that Spring and there was a lot of damage in some areas.  We had been down the river a few times by that year and usually camped on a particular spot the second night out.  We pulled in early that day as we were going to bake an apple pie and cook a rack of lamb in one of those reflector ovens.  We got camp set up and I fished for awhile.  There was a beaver across the river pulling his winter food supply into the lodge and he made a lot of racket.  There was a elk antler sticking out of the ground along the river about a foot.  I started digging it up and gave up at about three feet.  The shovel was one of those folding army type and the going just got too rocky.  I went for a walk down the river and started seeing way to many rattlesnakes.  Some dead ones but mostly live ones and we have a long term dislike of each other.  I thought about moving camp but remembered the old story about putting a rope around your sleeping bag and a snake would not cross it.  I finally realized we were sleeping in a tent so I would just keep it shut tight and keep the snakes out.  We were cooking the lamb about an hour before dark.  A raft with eight people went by, four guys and four girls.  They waved and we waved back.  About half an hour later we could hear women talking and laughing up above us on the cliff.  I was laying down looking for them when they came into view.  Not one of them had a stitch of clothing on.  I had my binoculars too.  They didn't seem to mind us watching them and just played along the edge for quite some time.  Burned the lamb but they left and pie came out okay.  Two days later we sat with them at the Eden Bridge take out waiting for our wives to pick us up.  Nobody mentioned the escapade but they blushed a bit when we floated up to take out the canoe.  Unfortunately I have no photos of this event.

My favorite knife?  A Kephart made by Sarge.  I have had it just long enough to have used it for a few things including dressing out the white tail buck I got a couple of Sundays ago.  I like this knife a lot.  Workmanship is one reason.  The origins is another.  With a 5" blade it is easy to use for a variety of tasks and food prep is one of them.  It is 01 tool steel with a Rockwell of 59.  Holds a good edge too.  Not a knife I would baton wood with although there are not many knives I would do that with anyway.  I believe axes are made for that task.  I enjoy carrying this tool around.  Knowing the maker is part of that, knowing a bit about Kephart just adds to it.

Where did I learn bushcraft skills.  Well what few skills I have came from camping and fishing as a kid.  I should add that some of them came from this forum too.  Things like pitching a tarp, knots, and so forth have been fun to learn on this site.  Anyway, we went on car camping trips and when I got old enough to go off by myself I would ride my motorcycle (you could ride on the street at 14 if your bike was 8 hp or less) and go into the high lakes in the Colorado mountains where we camped, fished, and cooked on our gasoline stoves at 12,000 to 14,000 feet.  Up that high you don't get any firewood skill so I had to learn that later.

Prefer alcohol, gas, or wood stoves? Having a fondness for the high altitude lakes resulted in my using gas stoves most of the time.  My favorite was, and still is, a old Optimus 80 Swedish stove.  It has been very reliable over the years.  I got it about 1970 and refurbished it a couple of years ago with a new wick and bought some spare jets and a couple of sets of cleaning needles.  If you don't have a cleaning needle for the 80 it won't light.  Learned that the hard way.

Do I have a bug out bag?  Nope, I am fortunate to live where I would bug out to.  Like Woods I carry a few things in my truck to keep me going.  Towing gear, a winch, shovel, tire chains and the like.  I always have a few bottles of water and some snacks, a blanket and a heavy coat.  If we go somewhere and there is the possibility of a winter storm I might throw in my portable CB radio.

This should be an interesting thread Woods.  It was a interesting video to listen to and might cause somebody (like me) to think a bit about what they have and what they do with it. 
 
« Last Edit: November 21, 2018, 05:12:22 PM by wsdstan »
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Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Eight Question Tag
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2018, 04:15:20 PM »
Great story relating your 2nd most memorable camping trip!!!!!...i was having images of possibly being abducted and ravaged by such beauties as that :drool:...sadly i never have that kind of bad luck :'(...LOL
enjoyed reading the answers to your other questions...thanks for taking part my friend...woods

also i'm including the eight question list above...sorry, i should have done that first
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Offline woodsorrel

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Re: Eight Question Tag
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2018, 07:09:03 PM »
This is an interesting topic.  Thank you for starting it, woodsrunner.

#1 your most memorable camp?
In my early twenties, I took the Sierra Club's Wilderness Travel Class as a way to learn outdoor skills.  The final exam was a snow camp in the high Sierras.  This was my very first backpack trip.  The bus arrived late (after dark) at our trail-head campsite in a strong snow flurry.  None of my group had practiced setting up our tent.  My flashlight was buried at the bottom of my pack (remember, this is my first time).  I had to unpack everything to reach my flashlight.  By the time I finally crawled into my sleeping bag, everything I brought with me was wet. 

The instructors told us to put our water bottles inside our sleeping bag to keep them from freezing.  What about my now wet clothes?  I didn't want them to freeze.
 Into my sleeping bag they went.  What about my stove?  And my wet boots?  All went into my sleeping bag with me.  By the time morning arrived, I had been up all night and was borderline hypothermic.

We started our trek in.  It was the first time I had carried a full pack.  It was the second time I was in snow shoes.

Most of the rest of the trip was a blur.  It's a miracle I ever ventured into the woods afterward.  But something struck a chord in me, even while I was suffering.  Today I hike, backpack, camp, and sea kayak.  And I feel that trip was somehow responsible.


#2 do you prefer solo or group camping?
I prefer company because my natural tendency is to worry in the dark (irrational, I know).  So having others in camp allows me to relax and enjoy the experience.


#3 what is your favorite knife?
I own a number of fancy fixed-blade and folding knives.  But the one I love is the plain old Fallkniven F1.  It seems as if it was made for my hand.  It takes all the abuse I can throw at it.  The spine throws great sparks.  And the knife feels like it's an extension of my arm.

I carry showier knives now.  But when I travel overseas deep into wilderness, I invariably reach for my Fallkniven F1. 


#4 where did you learn your bushcraft skills from?
I've had a number of wonderful teachers help me learn nature and traditional skills.  But the most influential have been Jim Lowery (Earthskills) and Garth Harwood (Hidden Villa).  Both are terrific animal trackers and students of nature.  Jim is terrific at teaching traditional skills. 

I'm grateful to all the teachers I've had.  And especially grateful for their patience with slow learners.  :)


#5 what is your favorite fire starting method?
Firesteel.  I don't wear myself out carving and bowing, or blister my hands twirling. 

The traditional firestarting method I enjoy most is the bamboo fire-saw.  Ironically, this is a method that many people despise.  I think I enjoy the use of larger muscles and less call for fine-motor skills.


#6 what type stove do you prefer, alcohol, wood or gas?
I still use an MSR Whisperlite International white-gas stove.  I love the energy-density of white gas.  I don't worry about altitude or ambient temperature. 

It has drawbacks.  I know the stove is more complicated to use and maintain.  I know it is heavier than gas and alcohol stoves.  I know it only has two settings - off and blowtorch.  But it has served me faithfully, and that counts for a lot.


#7 do you keep a bugout bag in your vehicle?
No.  I worry more about being stranded in wild and remote areas.  So the kit is geared more toward survival needs while staying by my car in cold and arid conditions.


#8 what is your most essential piece of gear?
Good hiking boots.  Lightweight.  Rigid.  Supportive.  Protective.

- Woodsorrel
« Last Edit: November 21, 2018, 07:17:00 PM by woodsorrel »
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Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Eight Question Tag
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2018, 08:50:15 PM »
Great answers all Woodsorrel ;)
Interesting most memorable...sounded difficult, but then no one remembers the easy ones.
Fallkniven F1 is one sweet knife and i always wanted one but (being a knife maker) could never justify the purchase.
I had a whisperlite once and kick myself for having sold it :shrug:...i feel as though i know a bit more about you amigo...thanks for participating :thumbsup:...woods
'At play in the fields of the Lord'
Save a Logger...Eat a Tree Hugger!

Offline madmax

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Re: Eight Question Tag
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2018, 05:07:09 AM »
Well I slept on this one and I'm no closer to narrowing down the choices.  Lol.  I'll give 'er a shot though.

1.My favorite camp could be any Kracaneuner Camp.  Love my brothers and sisters.  Or a solo Pot and Machete.  Maybe that camp on a no name lake in Alaska that I called in a pack of wolves.  I thought it was funny until I realized they were circling the lake and all of the sudden were just at the tree line.  So this is going to sound dumb but my wife and I were camped at Long Key State Park in the keys.  There's not much on Long Key, but it's not a primitive camp by any stretch.  Christmas Eve we heard Christmas carols.  oh boy.  But turns out the volunteer fire department came out and paraded with their engines, lights, and decorations to bring a little cheer to the campers.  It was still early but almost dark.  They threw candy to the kids and some got to ride through the campground on real fire engines.  I don't think any campers minded a bit.  It was kinda magical.


2. I'm 60.  My solo trips aren't as hard core as they used to be.  If you'd asked me 20 years ago my favorite would have been solo.  But then came the Krac camps and my body began complaining.  So now I like small groups.

3. My favorite knife right now is a Crashdive123 necker.  Ask me next week and I'll probably change my mind.  I've got no problem with a Opinel, a Tram machete, or a Mora though.  They all cut.

4. I got my love of the woods, camping, and canoes up in northern MN when I was young.  Camping skills sorta just evolved out of neccesity.

5. I like flint and steel.  But the Krac camps have a fire going by more modern methods before I can get my charcloth out.  lol. You have to come to Rendezvous or on a smaller camp to see me make it with them.  I still get a kick out of it.

6. Wood

7. Yes to the bugout bag.  I have one in the truck and Subaru, one in the house for a grab and go, one merged into my pack.

8.  Water.  It's FL and I no longer trust wild water anywhere. 










« Last Edit: November 22, 2018, 05:19:23 AM by madmax »
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline Mannlicher

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Re: Eight Question Tag
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2018, 06:34:56 AM »
I'll play
1.  So many great camps that I can't pick one.  I do love being with my Kracaneuner brothers.
2.  I love solo camping,  but then I love group camping too
3.  THIS week, my favorite knife is the Spyderco Puukko.   God knows what next week will bring.
4.  learned what bush craft skills I have from family and friends when I was a wee lad
5.  matches
6.  wood stove
7.  I keep a fully stocked BOB.  Useful for many purposes other than just bugging out
8.  TP