Author Topic: Japanese Swordsmithing  (Read 102 times)

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Offline Old Philosopher

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Japanese Swordsmithing
« on: November 25, 2018, 02:57:00 PM »
Just sort of a gee-whiz topic brought to mind by another thread.
I though you start-from-scratch knife makers might find this rather amazing, if you've never checked it out.

(I view Wiki as a clearing house for other references)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_swordsmithing

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Offline Unknown

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Re: Japanese Swordsmithing
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2018, 06:07:57 PM »
I have a kiridashi made with tamahagane. It's one of those things swordsmiths make with little bits of leftover steel for a few extra bucks. The name of the smith has escaped my memory and I don't read kanji. As a great tool it would have been better to buy a knife from a tool smith, which might have been 2x, 3x as much. These type objects, I believe, are purchased as a gratuity. You know, you have an appointment with a swordsmith or exclusive shop and don't buy a sword - so you buy a couple trinkets and bow out.

As a true made from scratch blade, I have an orishigane tanto made by Louis Mills. Many an expert will tell you his work is closest to the real deal. I think it is kinda neat. My initial plan was to have the blade fully polished. That never materialized.

I have read statements by Louis to the martial artist just to let them know his blade is unlikely to perform like a modern blade with scientifically perfect heat treat.

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Offline Sarge

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Re: Japanese Swordsmithing
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2018, 08:37:49 PM »
Good stuff!

There are countless videos on YouTube but is the best one I've found...
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Offline Unknown

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Re: Japanese Swordsmithing
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2018, 09:55:17 PM »
(One) The thing that always interested me Sarge was the interplay between the intent of the smith  and the purpose of the polisher.

As a Cutler and not the Smith: the interface with the user is always on my mind.






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