Author Topic: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening  (Read 423 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 512
    • NatureOutside
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
« on: January 02, 2019, 09:14:14 AM »
2019 begins with a momentous gift ? the tale of blustery winter evening.  It entered the public domain January 1.

The entire text is in the article, below.  I can see myself in the narrator's position, lingering beside the woods as they fill with snow. 

Do you have a favorite bushcraft-related poem, or other work of literature?


https://www.natureoutside.com/stopping-woods-snowy-evening/

- Wodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18763
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2019, 09:49:02 AM »
Thank you for the link, woodsorrel......tha t's my personal favorite poem, too.  I think it is the first time I ever heard Frost reciting it on film, too. 

I also enjoy The Cremation of Sam McGee and the other well known works from Robert W. Service....he sure can create an image in the mind!   Another favorite, by George Augustus Bixby, is Palace in the Popple.  About as vivid & humorous a description of friends making preparations for the opening day of deer season in their hunting cabin as I have ever read.

https://soundcloud.com/kevin-profitt/palace-in-the-popples-november-2017
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 10:05:31 AM by wolfy »
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline wsdstan

  • Supporting Member
  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 9227
Re: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2019, 10:55:58 AM »
I like Robert Frost poetry, as well as Robert Service.  Some of their poetry is sort of "bushcrafty".

Currently I am reading the newspaper columns and poetry of Eugene Field.  Field was born in Illinois in 1850 and died in 1895.  He lived, for a time in Denver and was a poet and columnist there and in Illinois.  In 1900, five years after his death, a two volume set of his poetry and columns was published by his wife.  I am currently reading this work.  Sharps and Flats is the name of the two volume set.

While little of his poetry is "bushy" he has a sharp wit and some of it pokes fun a politicians and celebrities of the late 1800's. 

I liked this one and it approaches bushcraft I suppose.

THE INDIAN AND THE TROUT

The morning sun in splendor shone
On the mellow park of the Yellowstone.
The President at the break of day
Had packed his duds and moved away.
A brave Shoshone chief came out
With his willow pole to fish for trout.
It was half -past six when he cast his line,
And he kept on fishing till half-past nine;
And then he baited his hook anew
And patiently fished until half-past two
The meanwhile swearing a powerful sight
For fishing all day with nary a bite.

And he swore and fished, and fished and swore
Till his Elgin watch tolled half-past four;
When a big, fat trout came swimming by
And winked at the chief with his cold, sad eye.

"And do you reckon, you pagan soul,
You can catch us trout with a willow pole?
The President taught us manners while
He fished for us in the latest style.
You've no idea how proud we feel
To be jerked ashore with a Frankfort reel!"

The red man gathered his dinner-pail
And started home by the shortest trail,
And he told his faithful squaw he guess'd
They'd better move still farther west,
Where presidents didn't come fooling about,
Turning the heads of the giddy trout.

September 5, 1883.


A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18763
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2019, 04:11:19 PM »
 :lol: :thumbsup:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Sarge

  • Supporting Member
  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2959
Re: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2019, 07:50:59 PM »
I liked that one, Stan. I've had them swim by me and wink their cold, sad eyes. Haha

Woodsorrel, that is one of my favorites. I was very unhappy in high school English class about having to memorize it verbatim, punctuation and all. Then in a freshman English class in college, we had to pick a poem to memorize. Most of the class picked the same poem - the shortest one in our book. I still remembered Stopping by Woods and got extra credit.

I like Rime of the Ancient Mariner and I'll admit I liked the Iron Maiden song first. Now I really like the poem. Maybe not exactly bushcrafty... but a lesson about man(kind) respecting nature.
"The man with the knapsack is never lost." Horace Kephart (1862-1931)

Offline woodsorrel

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 512
    • NatureOutside
Re: Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2019, 08:28:57 PM »
Thanks for the link, Wolfy!

wsdstan, maybe I shouldn't dress so shabbily next time I fish for trout.   ;D

Sarge, I'll check out The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.  I found the text online.

- Woodsorrel
The best backpacks are named for national parks or mountain ranges. Steer clear of those named for landfills.
Bushcraft tips and tricks:  www.NatureOutside.c om